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Well, darn. Freewheel removal...removed

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Well, darn. Freewheel removal...removed

Old 04-11-20, 04:34 PM
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Narhay
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Well, darn. Freewheel removal...removed




I have heard you can take the cogs off, clamp the ratchet and pray it pops off. Any other ideas? All I really want is the Nuovo Tipo high flange hubs.
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Old 04-11-20, 04:48 PM
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Give it a 24hr soak in penetrating oil before you do anything.

This works best when you have another project to take up the time and works worst when you don't.
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Old 04-11-20, 04:54 PM
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Use a tiny grinding wheel in a dremel and make some new square faces, and use the quick release to hold the freewheel tool completely engaged with the freewheel, once you crack it loose remove the quick release.
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Old 04-11-20, 04:55 PM
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My favorite thing to do to freewheels for which I have no remover is to take the whole outside off, so that just the core is left. You'll have to unscrew the cover plate, using a punch. It's left-hand threaded and since the remover splines are damaged, it may take some force, but I bet you can get it. Then about 1873580 bearings will spill on the floor, and pawls and springs will fly into your eyes or under your workbench, never to be found again. Then you will be able to unscrew the core using a pipe wrench or a vise.

The following video explains it.
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Old 04-11-20, 05:04 PM
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-----

all that is needed for removal is a remover with a guide ring such as the Dura-Ace or Bicycle Research.

no need to even square up the munged removal ears.




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Old 04-11-20, 05:11 PM
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The way you do the desperation removal is to take the whole freewheel body off, not the cogs. Unscrew the face plate and prepare for ball bearings everywhere. Then put the whole thing in a vise and twist it off. This generally destroys the freewheel. Oh, duh, scarlson already explained this. +1 on this method then. It always works.

If you want to save the freewheel, take it apart, grind some new notches as suggested above.

It might come off as is with one of those removers with a ring, but IME I'd say the odds are not great. Depends on how well greased the threads were when the FW was installed, among other things.
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Old 04-11-20, 07:58 PM
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As the guy in the video said, the faceplate or whatever it's called comes off clockwise. That's because it's reverse-threaded.
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Old 04-12-20, 10:18 AM
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Good stuff. Yeah I have a wheel I need to do this with. Time to buy a big pipe wrench.
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Old 04-12-20, 10:45 AM
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Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
Good stuff. Yeah I have a wheel I need to do this with. Time to buy a big pipe wrench.
I still have the big pipe wrench that I bought for this purpose about 25 years ago!
Haven't needed it since, naturally. Of course, I've gotten better at routinely pulling the freewheel and applying new/more grease to the threads.

I think I needed it for a two prong SunTour freewheel. I was amazed at how hard the steel used for the body was. The pipe wrench struggled to get a grip on it.

Steve in Peoria
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Old 04-12-20, 11:10 AM
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Originally Posted by steelbikeguy View Post
I still have the big pipe wrench that I bought for this purpose about 25 years ago!
Haven't needed it since, naturally. Of course, I've gotten better at routinely pulling the freewheel and applying new/more grease to the threads.

I think I needed it for a two prong SunTour freewheel. I was amazed at how hard the steel used for the body was. The pipe wrench struggled to get a grip on it.

Steve in Peoria
Oh yeah, greasing the threads makes all the difference. The wheels are from a 1985 Cannondale ST 400 I bought used 2 years ago. That bike was pretty much all original. I'll bet that freewheel hasn't seen any service for 35 years. Plus it takes a flaky shimano removal tool. I was able to buy a VAR tool for it but the tool bit the dust when I used it. The metal was too soft. But the wheels and hubs are worth salvaging (shimano 600 hubs laced to rigida 27 inch rims).
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Old 04-12-20, 11:32 AM
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Been there, done that:
Damaged Regina freewheel & a dremel to the rescue
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Old 04-12-20, 12:11 PM
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Yes to the YouTube vid.

13-30 Suntour 7 speed freewheel on a 1992 cdale. I Destroyed one of the co-ops widgits then watched the vid.

Key manouvers.
1: Tap punching the lockring.
2. Mega pipe wrench.
3. Flat stone wall.
4. My full bodyweight standing on wrench with wheel wedged to wall. Light bounce and bingo.


There was so much life in the rims I had to try.
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Old 04-12-20, 02:35 PM
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A bench vise makes this stuff easier than any wrench. A couple of times I've trotted over to the LBS so they could use their vise to unstick stuck stuff that I couldn't remove with my longest wrench and cheater bar.

A wheel gives plenty of leverage when using a bench vise, but you lose that leverage with a wrench and have to wrestle both the wrench and the wheel.
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Old 04-12-20, 03:46 PM
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-----

a far simpler technique when you lack the correct remover is to remove the hub's axle set and then remove the gear block with a Nr. 8 screw extractor ("easy-out") -



Brands such as ACE, Drill Hog and Sears offer them individually so no need to purchase a set.

-----
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Old 04-12-20, 03:59 PM
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The core is not perfectly round, so if you use some soft, copper or aluminum, even leather jaws on a big bench vise, sometimes you can unscrew the core without damaging it.
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Old 04-12-20, 07:45 PM
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Thanks for all the ideas. I will try a couple and if they fail I will buy the easy out.
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Old 04-13-20, 05:51 AM
  #17  
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Originally Posted by Reynolds View Post
The core is not perfectly round, so if you use some soft, copper or aluminum, even leather jaws on a big bench vise, sometimes you can unscrew the core without damaging it.
This:
I've managed it three or four times over the years and was able to re-assemble the freewheel.

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