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Must be getting bored - pedal rebuilds

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Must be getting bored - pedal rebuilds

Old 05-22-20, 05:12 AM
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Narhay
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Must be getting bored - pedal rebuilds

Pulled out all the pedals I had in the basement and started to go over them. Some were nicer inside than others.

Lyotard 460D, 14x125 thread










Raleigh 501 pedals






Kyukuto Pro Vic II, since cleaned up a bit more.





Campagnolo Gran Sport



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Old 05-22-20, 05:33 AM
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John Nolan 
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Any tips? For some reason, my pedal rebuilds never work out: there seems to be about 2 degrees of rotation between grinding and wobble when I try to do this.

Last edited by John Nolan; 05-22-20 at 06:15 AM.
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Old 05-22-20, 06:05 AM
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Narhay
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Originally Posted by John Nolan View Post
Any tips? For some reason, my pedal rebuilds never work out: there seems to be about 2 degrees of rotation between grinding a wobble when I try to do this.
I think pedals are one of those things that have a relatively small load bearing surface and high stress loads so when they go out of adjustment but someone keeps pounding on them for years they will wear unevenly. I found one of the 501s to be virtually unadjustable even after cleaning everything. The others all adjusted just fine after some new balls but you're right. One millimeter adjustment at a time resulted in quite different rotational results.
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Old 05-22-20, 06:10 AM
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I will tackle anything, but pedals drive me nuts, for the reasons mentioned above. I've taken to using the needle attachment on my grease gun to just inject fresh grease and leave the rest alone.
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Old 05-22-20, 06:17 AM
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Ah, new balls...I haven't been doing that for some reason. MIght help!
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Old 05-22-20, 06:41 AM
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The Campagnolo Gran Sport pedals were by far the most refined internally. The bearing surfaces, cones and hardware was a notch above and you could feel the quality. The japanese pedals were next, then the lyotard was a close 3rd, possibly sharing the 2nd spot. The Raleigh, possibly due to the inability to adjust properly, a distant 4th.
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Old 05-22-20, 07:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Narhay View Post
The Campagnolo Gran Sport pedals were by far the most refined internally. The bearing surfaces, cones and hardware was a notch above and you could feel the quality.
As far as I can tell, the Gran Sport pedal spindles only differed from the higher-end Record and Superleggero pedal spindles in that they lacked the rifling to inhibit contamination. They even interchange with Record/Superleggero:

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Old 05-22-20, 08:38 AM
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Nice work on those pedals Narhay . They are often overlooked.
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Old 05-22-20, 11:39 AM
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Timely thread. I recently overhauled a pair of Campy SL pedals. They got new spindles, cones, balls, and new cups on the left pedal.



Homemade cup removal tool in action:




The whole process actually went much smoother than I anticipated. Pedals feel like brand new now.
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Old 05-22-20, 11:49 AM
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BFisher what is the tool in the second photo that you used to punch out the race?
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Old 05-22-20, 01:16 PM
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Originally Posted by branko_76 View Post
BFisher what is the tool in the second photo that you used to punch out the race?
That is my homemade race remover. I needed one, but didn't have any scrap tubing the correct diameter.

Or did I...


That is a piece of the seat stay from a scrap frame I have here taking up space. Ran it over a wire wheel, made two perpendicular cuts with a hack saw, and flared it out with the end of a pin punch. It worked perfectly. I pressed it backwards through the center of the old bearing cup using the deep well socket shown in the third photo above, and then tapped the cup right out. Did the same to the other side.
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Old 05-22-20, 01:18 PM
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Awesome !
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Old 05-22-20, 01:26 PM
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I gave up pedal rebuilds many years ago. It is fussy work; if the cone is not properly locked against the outer locknut, this could cause the right pedal to disassemble during riding. On the left, the cone will self-tighten and eventually lock up the pedal, destroy the bearings and cone. Then the pedal will get so tight it will unwind itself, which happened to me in the middle of a 200k ride.

See the hole in the end cap of the Campy pedals: this is meant for grease injection. Anticipating some fussy and pedantic C&V folks here: you may feel compelled to call this an 'oil port', but yes, you can and should inject grease here.

So take you grease injector and flood the pedal internals until the old grease gets shot out through the gap on the inside of the pedal. Clean as a whistle; good as new. Seconds per pedal. Still not clean enough for you? Then spin the pedal a few revolutions and repeat the purge.
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Old 05-22-20, 01:35 PM
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Nice to see someone taking the trouble, Narhay! These pedals deserve it.

BTW, I am a big fan of the 460D. Looks good and works well in many applications, from high-end vintage French racers to lowly city bikes. Probably my favorite pedal. (Pro tip: if you want your wide-bodied sneakers to work with real vintage pedals and toe clips, this is the pedal to look for.)
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Old 05-22-20, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Dave Mayer View Post
I gave up pedal rebuilds many years ago. It is fussy work; if the cone is not properly locked against the outer locknut, this could cause the right pedal to disassemble during riding. On the left, the cone will self-tighten and eventually lock up the pedal, destroy the bearings and cone. Then the pedal will get so tight it will unwind itself, which happened to me in the middle of a 200k ride.

See the hole in the end cap of the Campy pedals: this is meant for grease injection. Anticipating some fussy and pedantic C&V folks here: you may feel compelled to call this an 'oil port', but yes, you can and should inject grease here.

So take you grease injector and flood the pedal internals until the old grease gets shot out through the gap on the inside of the pedal. Clean as a whistle; good as new. Seconds per pedal. Still not clean enough for you? Then spin the pedal a few revolutions and repeat the purge.
I would follow up with another spin of the spindle, then applying highly compressed air to create as much air volume around the spindles and cones as possible.
It will spin much easier, and won't be churning out grease onto your shoe during the first few rides. And there will still be PLENTY of grease inside.
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Old 05-22-20, 01:54 PM
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Originally Posted by branko_76 View Post
Nice work on those pedals Narhay . They are often overlooked.
+1

Good on you Narhay for doing these. Many pedals have died premature deaths because people tend to not bother rebuilding. They aren't that hard to do.
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Old 05-22-20, 09:50 PM
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Thanks for all the feedback and nice comments.

I find the rebuilt pedals work fine if you cinch down the outer locknut with a decent socket with a good amount of force. The keyed washer holds things in place and should tighten up against the cone. If you dont tighten these enough then yes, it will come apart as you've experienced.

Interestingly they all took 11mm sockets on the outer locknut but all had their own design for the cone nut.

Pumping in new grease may work but all these pedals had some sort of contaminant in them so it would not be as thorough.
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Old 05-22-20, 10:21 PM
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I recently rebuilt some shimano 600 pedals I have lying around and did a passingly good job on them without the pedal locknut tool (TL-PD63). The pedals already had some pitting so I didn't worry about getting it perfect. But, is there a cheaper version of the TL-PD63? I don't see it anywhere for less than $50 including shipping.
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Old 05-23-20, 06:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Dave Mayer View Post
I gave up pedal rebuilds many years ago. It is fussy work.
There's really nothing more "fussy" about it than overhauling hubs or a bottom bracket. As long as the internal parts are in decent shape (axle, cone, lock washer, and locknut), it works out perfectly every time ... at least for me.

Now if the pedals are unserviceable, sure, inject some new grease, and call it good.
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Old 05-23-20, 07:23 AM
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For those of us that actually enjoy building and maintaining our bikes, a pedal rebuild is just part of the hobby side, certainly not for everybody. This is interesting as I just finished a pair of Superleggeri pedals that I got for $40 . They looked great , but one was definitely easier to spin than the other. Great , I get to use that super cool Campy dust cap wrench! After removing the caps, they both appeared to have been greased and clean . I disassembled them anyway and cleaned/ regreased then reassembled and adjusted to the correct feel . Was it necessary? Not really but I enjoy doing it so to me it gives me peace of mind. I like the Campy built pedals and that is why I have them on almost all my bikes.
Joe. joesvintageroadbikes.wordpress

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