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Miyata 914 I'm not sure what to do with it.

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Miyata 914 I'm not sure what to do with it.

Old 05-27-20, 05:10 PM
  #1  
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Miyata 914 I'm not sure what to do with it.

I purchased this Miyata 914 Ser# TG44892 (58) new about 30 years ago. Rode it quite a bit the first few years and then it has mostly been stored in my garage. It's in very good condition. Rear wheel and seat of the bike are not original and I don't have the pedals. I'm debating what to do with the bike as in it's current form it is too aggressive for me to ride comfortably. Can I make it more comfortable or should I sell it and let someone who can appreciate the bike more have at it. What would be a good asking price for this bike on Craigslist or Ebay? What would you do with this bike? I'm open to suggestions.






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Old 05-27-20, 05:15 PM
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It could be as simple as a shorter, taller stem, like a Nitto Technomic. Or maybe just taller. With the seat post at that height and the stem length as you have it, the bike may be a bit too small. But, if you like the way it rides, why not try an easy fix first?

EDIT: Although, if you haven't touched in 20 years, it may be best to start fresh.
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Old 05-27-20, 05:16 PM
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Sell, I think you need something else.
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Old 05-27-20, 05:20 PM
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I am pretty sure there is someone here who would take it off your hands, but by aggressive, do you mean the geometry, the thin tires, the bars?

Are they 27" tires? You might be able to put thicker 700C tyres on it if the brakes reach, a more comfortable seat and some straight city bars and stem? Would make a heck of commuter/city bike?

You could also get a wider range freewheel/cassette (I think it is a freewheel)?

If it is the steeper angles, not sure that the above would help enough.
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Old 05-27-20, 05:20 PM
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If the seat is at the correct height for you, then you probably need a bigger frame anyway.
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Old 05-27-20, 05:23 PM
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If you decided to sell, there is an appraisal side to this sub forum, and you'll get plenty of advice...mostly based on your location...
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Old 05-27-20, 05:37 PM
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I always thought the bike fit me well. I'm 6'0". It will accept 700c tires 28c easily, maybe up to 32c. I prefer a more upright riding position at my age. I feel like the bike is a sports car, handles very nimbly, but I am more comfortable with a sedan. I'll try the appraisal forum, thanks.
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Old 05-27-20, 05:40 PM
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Originally Posted by branko_76 View Post
If the seat is at the correct height for you, then you probably need a bigger frame anyway.
Good chance you are correct. Maybe that's why I find it too aggressive.
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Old 05-27-20, 05:42 PM
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Seems to be a 91, so certainly 700c.
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Old 05-27-20, 05:43 PM
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The thing is ... the more you ride and push yourself, the greater will be your riding condition, and the more aggressive you will want your road bike ... at least for me.

I'd start with a shorter, black stem (90-100mm), bars with a shallow drop (like Cinelli 64-40), a Turbo saddle, and japanese pedals with clips/straps.
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Old 05-27-20, 06:30 PM
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You've had it since new? That IS a pretty nice bike. 8 speed 105 is pretty modern, indexed shifting and dual pivot brakes, nice paint. If I wanted to sit upright on that bike, I'd get a sprung Brooks, a shorter stem, some north road type bars and bar end shifters. Some MKS sylvan pedals and cork grips to finish it off.

What at are you riding now?
edit: you ride a Scott sub 20. Boring. This Miyata is a classic and you should keep it.
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Old 05-27-20, 06:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Classtime View Post
You've had it since new? That IS a pretty nice bike. 8 speed 105 is pretty modern, indexed shifting and dual pivot brakes, nice paint. If I wanted to sit upright on that bike, I'd get a sprung Brooks, a shorter stem, some north road type bars and bar end shifters. Some MKS sylvan pedals and cork grips to finish it off.

What at are you riding now?
Thanks. Yes I bought it new. It is a nice bike in great shape. That makes it more difficult for me to part with it. I have been riding a Scott Sub20 Hybrid that I really enjoy for at least the last 10 years. I like the more comfortable ride and the more upright riding position. If I could replicate that with the 914 maybe I would consider keeping it. I will investigate some of your suggestions, thanks!
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Old 05-27-20, 06:48 PM
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If you explore the C&V forum just a little you will see many examples of gentrified go-fast bikes. Flat bars with trigger shifters, upward angled stems and saddles meant for upright comfort are regular fare. There is something to said for "run what you brung."
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Old 05-27-20, 06:59 PM
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I will have a look around C&V. See if something catches my eye. I still want the bike to look sporty. Although I have been riding for many years I'm new to modifying or doing anything other than basic maintenance to my bikes. I do like how responsive the 914 feels compared to my Scott hybrid bike. I wonder if it will still feel that way after I make some changes.

"run what you brung." I do agree with that sentiment.


Thanks to all that have contributed to this thread.

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Old 05-27-20, 08:33 PM
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An adjustment for more comfort can be as simple as replacing that massive 120mm/130mm stem and super long reach bars (centerline of bars where they clamp to the centerline of the "hooks" at their furthest point...or just look at how far the brake levers sit).

A 90mm or 100mm stem (26.0mm handlebar clamping diameter) plus a Soma Highway One bar (or similar--compact profile, 26.0mm clamp diameter) will net you a substantially decreased reach--to the point where the brake hoods would be located a good 3" or so at least back toward you. That will have a huge effect on mitigating the "too aggressive" setup presently.

Yes there are plenty of upright conversions of go-fast bikes, and that's all well and good, but if you'd like to keep the purity of look and feel, then a stem and bar swap is a great way to go. A hybrid bike, especially with heavy front suspension, is not designed to be fast or responsive. That 914 is a thoroughbred competition bike. Very different purposes. With upright and swept back bars, the bike will/can still be plenty quick and responsive because of its geometry and light wheels, tires, frame, and components.
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Old 05-27-20, 09:08 PM
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Originally Posted by RiddleOfSteel View Post
An adjustment for more comfort can be as simple as replacing that massive 120mm/130mm stem and super long reach bars (centerline of bars where they clamp to the centerline of the "hooks" at their furthest point...or just look at how far the brake levers sit).


A 90mm or 100mm stem (26.0mm handlebar clamping diameter) plus a Soma Highway One bar (or similar--compact profile, 26.0mm clamp diameter) will net you a substantially decreased reach--to the point where the brake hoods would be located a good 3" or so at least back toward you. That will have a huge effect on mitigating the "too aggressive" setup presently.


Yes there are plenty of upright conversions of go-fast bikes, and that's all well and good, but if you'd like to keep the purity of look and feel, then a stem and bar swap is a great way to go. A hybrid bike, especially with heavy front suspension, is not designed to be fast or responsive. That 914 is a thoroughbred competition bike. Very different purposes. With upright and swept back bars, the bike will/can still be plenty quick and responsive because of its geometry and light wheels, tires, frame, and components.
This sounds more appealing to me. I like the idea of at least trying a relativity easy fix to improve the comfort and as you say maintaining the purity of the bike. . I would continue to mostly ride my hybrid but I like the idea of having the Nine 14 to ride when I want to have some fun. If that does not work out for me I'll sell it. Thanks.


Edit""""" Since I have only ridden the Nine 14 a few times in the last 20 years I probably need to ride it at least a few times to help me determine what I really find uncomfortable about riding it. I do enjoy the nimbleness of the bike.

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Old 05-27-20, 09:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Rdytoroll View Post
This sounds more appealing to me. I like the idea of at least trying a relativity easy fix to improve the comfort and as you say maintaining the purity of the bike. . I would continue to mostly ride my hybrid but I like the idea of having the Nine 14 to ride when I want to have some fun. If that does not work out for me I'll sell it. Thanks.


Edit""""" Since I have only ridden the Nine 14 a few times in the last 20 years I probably need to ride it at least a few times to help me determine what I really find uncomfortable about riding it. I do enjoy the nimbleness of the bike.
Definitely ride it as is and refamiliarize yourself with it. Sometimes it takes a little bit of time to sync you and the bike, whether that be a bike as is or via component changes. You have a good starting platform, so that helps a lot.
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Old 05-28-20, 12:55 PM
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Thanks to this forum and its members I got motivated and got my Miyata Nine 14 ready to ride. I also raised the seat and the bars about an inch. The bike felt more comfortable that way. I went for about an hour ride. The bike rode like a champ. Fast, nimble and a bit twitchy. Maybe that was just me.

I learned pretty quickly why I have been hesitant to ride it. I feel like I am too far forward and am supporting too much of my body with my shoulders, arms and hands.. This gets uncomfortable and tiring pretty quickly. I guess this is what I mean when I say the bike feels too aggressive for me

I happened to pass by the bike shop where I bought the bike 30 years ago; I did not stop in due to this pandemic thing. The owner who sold me the bike still works there. I will probably stop by there soon and see what they might advise.

As someone stated, the bike may be small for me but I feel if that is true, it is only slightly on the small side. Will changing out the stem and/or the handlebars as recommended by some help make the bike more comfortable for me to ride or is this just the nature of road bikes?
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Old 05-28-20, 01:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Rdytoroll View Post
Thanks to this forum and its members I got motivated and got my Miyata Nine 14 ready to ride. I also raised the seat and the bars about an inch. The bike felt more comfortable that way. I went for about an hour ride. The bike rode like a champ. Fast, nimble and a bit twitchy. Maybe that was just me.

I learned pretty quickly why I have been hesitant to ride it. I feel like I am too far forward and am supporting too much of my body with my shoulders, arms and hands.. This gets uncomfortable and tiring pretty quickly. I guess this is what I mean when I say the bike feels too aggressive for me

I happened to pass by the bike shop where I bought the bike 30 years ago; I did not stop in due to this pandemic thing. The owner who sold me the bike still works there. I will probably stop by there soon and see what they might advise.

As someone stated, the bike may be small for me but I feel if that is true, it is only slightly on the small side. Will changing out the stem and/or the handlebars as recommended by some help make the bike more comfortable for me to ride or is this just the nature of road bikes?
Look up a few google image searches of "Nitto dynamic ii," "Nitto periscopa," "Nitto technomic," "dirt drop stem drop handlebars," and "Soma Highway 1 short reach" to see how various stem types can orient the bars differently, bringing them higher and closer to you, and how short-reach drop bars can bring you a little closer in than your current bars. You have be mindful of the clamp diameter of both the stem and bars before making any changes, but this can give you an idea of how you would sit with some mild modifications to the current setup.
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Old 05-28-20, 01:38 PM
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Originally Posted by noobinsf View Post
Look up a few google image searches of "Nitto dynamic ii," "Nitto periscopa," "Nitto technomic," "dirt drop stem drop handlebars," and "Soma Highway 1 short reach" to see how various stem types can orient the bars differently, bringing them higher and closer to you, and how short-reach drop bars can bring you a little closer in than your current bars. You have be mindful of the clamp diameter of both the stem and bars before making any changes, but this can give you an idea of how you would sit with some mild modifications to the current setup.
Thanks I will check that out. I feel like I need more of my weight directed to my seat and less to my arms. Is this a common problem with road bikes? It's not like I have a weak upper body.

Another question. I wish the shifters were mounted on the handlebars and not the frame. Any recommendations as far as those are concerned?

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Old 05-28-20, 01:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Rdytoroll View Post
Thanks I will check that out. I feel like I need more of my weight directed to my seat and less to my arms. Is this a common problem with road bikes? It's no like I have a weak upper body.
I know there is a ton of information out there about fit, and I don't consider myself well-informed, but I came across this article that seems like a good primer. https://blog.bikefit.com/adjusting-h...-bike-fitting/

There is also a section of Bikeforums devoted to bike fit: https://www.bikeforums.net/fitting-your-bike/

I tend to tinker, so I change handlebars a lot to see how the changes feel.
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Old 05-28-20, 02:01 PM
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Thanks. Seems like proper fit is more critical and more difficult to achieve with a road bike. I never had many issues with my mountain or hybrid bikes.
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Old 05-28-20, 02:44 PM
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The thing that sucks with this is that quill stems are a lot of work for trial and error.

IMO- Nitto Technomic stem at 100mm, some sort of swept back bar and thumb shifters.
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Old 05-28-20, 05:35 PM
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Nine 14 with adjustments to seat and stem. Better fit but still uncomfortable.


Scott Sub 20 my normal ride. No issues with comfort.

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Old 05-28-20, 05:39 PM
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Here is an example of what a Nitto Dynamic II stem could look like on a speedy bike like yours (not my pic, not my bike). This, coupled with shallower bars would stretch you out less. The forward posture that you find troublesome is achieved partly by the aggressive saddle-to-handlebar drop, and this type of stem and shallow, short reach bars would soften that effect. (Note -- the pictured bars are not shallow or short reach. I was just illustrating the stem.)


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