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Trek 1000 for $200 ... Should I have?

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Trek 1000 for $200 ... Should I have?

Old 05-31-20, 06:15 PM
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prairiepedaler
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Trek 1000 for $200 ... Should I have?

There was a Trek 1000 locally today for $200. Original owner, original condition. The guy rode it a year and then his heart condition wouldn't allow for him to continue so it sat in the garage for 25+ years. It was a 24" frame; my size range. But, I let it go. All my current bikes are older ones and aren't anything really special. I like many of the older road bikes quite a bit but I think I wouldn't enjoy them as much as a newer one (say made in the 2000's). They have made some improvements, no?

I saw a riding comparison video of two fellows who rode the same path on a newer road bike compared to a good older one and the performance differential was notable. What was also notable was that there really wasn't very much performance difference between a top line modern road bike and a very good modern road bike. This sort of rationalization helps me stay sane when all these cool older bikes show up for sale for good prices and I just let them pass by to hold out for something newer.
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Old 05-31-20, 07:01 PM
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Pros rode steel bikes with down tube shifters, non-aero levers, and pedal clips for decades before things changed in the late '80s and early '90s. Like many here, the old ways work beautifully for me. And I can go as fast and far as I want. When they need service, it's inexpensive and simple, and I can do everything myself.
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Old 05-31-20, 07:32 PM
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I rode a 1990 Trek 1000 for several years although I was primarily a mountain biker then. You didn't miss out on anything.
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Old 05-31-20, 07:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Spaghetti Legs View Post
I rode a 1990 Trek 1000 for several years although I was primarily a mountain biker then. You didn't miss out on anything.
I like those treks because they are alloy but still have classic tube shapes. The 1000 was the best of those frames at the time I believe, in that it came with better components and the frame itself was lighter than the other alloy frames they had. But, yeah, for $200 I'd also agree that you didnt miss much.
I rode a few different vintage steel bikes before I found a trek SL 1000 from the early 2000's at a thrift store for $25. That bike truly changed my cycling life, as it came with STI shifters and was less than 20 lbs. It would GO when I stomped on the pedals. I got into group rides and bike racing because of that thing. For me, the "modern bike" was a game changer. If it wasn't only $25, who knows, I'd probably still be riding a converted fixed gear around.
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Old 05-31-20, 07:49 PM
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Originally Posted by celesteguy View Post
I like those treks because they are alloy but still have classic tube shapes. The 1000 was the best of those frames at the time I believe, in that it came with better components and the frame itself was lighter than the other alloy frames they had. But, yeah, for $200 I'd also agree that you didnt miss much.
I rode a few different vintage steel bikes before I found a trek SL 1000 from the early 2000's at a thrift store for $25. That bike truly changed my cycling life, as it came with STI shifters and was less than 20 lbs. It would GO when I stomped on the pedals. I got into group rides and bike racing because of that thing. For me, the "modern bike" was a game changer. If it wasn't only $25, who knows, I'd probably still be riding a converted fixed gear around.
Mine was probably a little too big for me, but it was stiff as all get out and beat the heck out of me. Definitely looked better to me than the first super sized down tubed Cannondales.Took me a long time to get over my distaste for aluminum frames.
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Old 05-31-20, 07:51 PM
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Originally Posted by celesteguy View Post
I like those treks because they are alloy but still have classic tube shapes. The 1000 was the best of those frames at the time I believe, in that it came with better components and the frame itself was lighter than the other alloy frames they had. But, yeah, for $200 I'd also agree that you didnt miss much.
I rode a few different vintage steel bikes before I found a trek SL 1000 from the early 2000's at a thrift store for $25. That bike truly changed my cycling life, as it came with STI shifters and was less than 20 lbs. It would GO when I stomped on the pedals. I got into group rides and bike racing because of that thing. For me, the "modern bike" was a game changer. If it wasn't only $25, who knows, I'd probably still be riding a converted fixed gear around.
The 1000 has always been a baseline aluminum frame with entry level components. Still a decent ride and reliable build. At 200 it's worth the cost but newer is better.
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Old 05-31-20, 07:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Russ Roth View Post
The 1000 has always been a baseline aluminum frame with entry level components. Still a decent ride and reliable build. At 200 it's worth the cost but newer is better.
Whoops, you're right. I was confusing it with the 2000 which is the high end one in the line up, I think.
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Old 06-01-20, 10:00 AM
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Ok, thanks for the input. I do like re-using things whenever possible. A 70 year old bike can still get someone where they need to go just as well as one hot off the presses. Every bike I have was made last Century. For a road tourer I'm still going to aim for something newer, possibly these guys if they show up in my size locally. I'd like to eventually ride from here to visit a relative way out East then take a train back (against the prevailing Westerly wind). That's the plan.
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Old 06-01-20, 10:04 AM
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Those bikes were, IIRC, really popular - you aren't missing on a once-in-a-lifetime deal by passing one.

Cannondale CAADs from that period were good enough to be professionally raced (by Saeco) as late as the early 2000s. Bianchi, IIRC was a fairly late user of aluminum as well. I think a few pro teams were racing steel as late as 2001 (I recall an article featuring the ill-fated Mercury team complaining about racing Reynolds 853 bikes that year).

I think the last steel bike raced "in anger" by a top level pro team was CSC racing the Cervelo (Super)Prodigy at Paris-Roubaix '03, though a Continental British team used steel Genesis bikes (Reynolds 953 stainless) very recently.

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Old 06-01-20, 10:58 AM
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Round tube aluminum Treks - with Easton or Alcoa tubing - are nice rides.

When Trek migrated from round Easton or Alcoa toward shaped Alpha Aluminum tubing around the year 2000, ride quality took a significant hit. The triangular section downtube is the giveaway. These frames are stiffer than the round tube ones, and not necessarily in a good way. FYI.
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