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Waverly by Columbia - know nothing about this bike

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Waverly by Columbia - know nothing about this bike

Old 06-15-20, 09:01 PM
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tkuczura
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Waverly by Columbia - know nothing about this bike

Hi All,


One of my neighbors has had this bike and doesn't know anything about it. Did a few searches, but couldn't locate anything meaningful on the Waverly. Took some pictures to ask here. I didn't measure the bike, but will in the next few days and update this post.

Neighbor really likes the bike - appears to be all original. He would like to know some history on this bike and is willing to sell. Location is Chicago area.


Thanks in advance,

Tom












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Old 06-15-20, 09:10 PM
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While a pristine example of the breed, Columbia made low-end department store-level bikes, the ones that were advertised for $79.95 (or thereabouts), so the bike probably does not have much value unless someone wants that specific thing. But nearly everything with wheels is selling hot right now so tell your neighbor to put it on Craigslist with his dream price on it and see what happens. Or just ride it.

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Old 06-15-20, 09:13 PM
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Minty, in more ways than one.

It's low-end. Straight gauge tubing, one piece crank, stem shifters, steel wheels and it's from the bike boom era of the 70s. There isn't much value in it. That doesn't mean it can't be a joy to ride. A little maintenance to make sure it's safe (new brake pages, possibly new tires if they are cracked, make sure the shifting works) and it would be a fun bike.
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Old 06-16-20, 03:45 PM
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Originally Posted by thumpism View Post
While a pristine example of the breed, Columbia made low-end department store-level bikes, the ones that were advertised for $79.95 (or thereabouts), so the bike probably does not have much value unless someone wants that specific thing. But nearly everything with wheels is selling hot right now so tell your neighbor to put it on Craigslist with his dream price on it and see what happens. Or just ride it.
Thanks for the info. He really like the bike and he says it's a smooth ride.Sharing this post with him
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Old 06-16-20, 03:49 PM
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Originally Posted by tricky View Post
Minty, in more ways than one.

It's low-end. Straight gauge tubing, one piece crank, stem shifters, steel wheels and it's from the bike boom era of the 70s. There isn't much value in it. That doesn't mean it can't be a joy to ride. A little maintenance to make sure it's safe (new brake pages, possibly new tires if they are cracked, make sure the shifting works) and it would be a fun bike.
The tires are cracked, but he took it for a ride.
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Old 06-16-20, 04:37 PM
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Definitely Bike Boom, but not department store.

The American bicycle industry back in the early 70's really ran on about four levels:

Schwinn, of course, was the best. Best construction, best paint, best chrome, and the highest price.

Columbia was about half a step down. While the frames looked like the department store bikes, they were better constructed. Components were usually about the same as what Schwinn was using at the time. Columbia 3-speeds back then were using Sturmei-Archer AW hubs, while the department store bikes were using Shimano 333's. The bike shop I worked at back then (Schwinn/Raleigh/Columbia at the east side store, Schwinn/Raleigh/Astra/Roger Riviere at the west side one) carried Columbia as their low priced brand. This shop had opened in 1914 and I believe had carried Schwinn and Columbia all those years. By the mid 70s, Columbia was finished, at least in our area. Looked too much like the department store bikes, but cost about midway between them and Schwinn's. Their attempts at 10-speeds were rather abysmal, whereas their single and three speed bikes were fairly decent.

Next step down was Murray and Rollfast - the department store bikes. Exactly what you think they were. Cheap bicycles.

The bottom step was Iverson. Looked like a Rollfast, but the construction quality was so poor it made Rollfast look like Schwinn by comparison. We'd get them in at the shop with the head tube broken off at the frame joints. These were sold by the 'catalog stores' (cheap, big box stores before Walmart became national).
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Old 06-16-20, 06:37 PM
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As said, low-end bike. If he has ridden a bike with alloy rims and better components he will understand. Big bike shortage at the moment, and it's late spring. It has gone from a hard-to-sell $50 bike (at least in my neck of the woods) to a quick sell $100 bike. I have been trying to find a bike project myself, and have been following the ads closely in my area. It's pretty crazy right now. If he wants to sell it he best hurry before the boomlet goes bust.
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