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Miyata Triple Cross VS Road Bike

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Miyata Triple Cross VS Road Bike

Old 07-01-20, 12:19 PM
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WhatTheDelromi
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Miyata Triple Cross VS Road Bike

Hello. So I live in a major city and I've been in the market for a vintage road bike. I've been looking mainly at Japanese models with drop handlebars because that's just what I know and I'm not looking for a mountain bike.

That said, I recently came across a circa 1990 Miyata Triple Cross with riser bars. Basically a road bike with riser bars (hybrid).

I know it's a really basica question, but how do you think these bars would affect my riding experience in traffic in terms of control. And how about on long rides? Would I sacrifice speed?

Lastly, I'm 6'4". Do you think a 23" frame is big enough?

Thanks!
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Old 07-01-20, 01:09 PM
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I've never understood all the people who buy a vintage road bicycle then add upright handlebars, lower gearing and try to cram in wide tyres. Why not just buy a hybrid?

Personally, a hybrid is an excellent choice for riding in traffic. They put you just a bit higher for better visibility (seeing and being seen), the wider tyres handle the debris better, the controls are always at your fingertips, they have fittings for racks and clearances for mudguards. Typically, they are lighter and more responsive than an ATB, though not up to road bicycle standards.

There will be some sacrifice in speed on long rides but perhaps not quite a much as you expect. The position will be comparable to riding on the hoods with the simple additon of bar end extensions, which will also, provide an extra hand position. So, unless you ride the drops a lot, you're not sacrificing much in aerodynamics. Most riders these days seem to be more concerned with having fat, cushy riding tyres than speed. A hybrid will give that flexibility to go fatter and lower pressure or narrower and higher pressure. A good set of appropriate tyres will make a big difference on any bicycle.

A hybrid is very much a Jack of all trades bicycles. It's probably best for commuting and light recreational riding but can also be used as for light duty off-road, gravel cycling and road riding, though it's a compromise. That's why n+1 is so popular on the forums. To get the most out of each style of riding, you need a bicycle designed specifically for that purpose.

As for size, the Triple Cross was a traditional horizontal top tube design. For the average portioned 6" 4" person, I'd want a 63cm frame.
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Old 07-01-20, 02:48 PM
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Great feedback, thank you.
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Old 07-01-20, 05:01 PM
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Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
I've never understood all the people who buy a vintage road bicycle then add upright handlebars, lower gearing and try to cram in wide tyres. Why not just buy a hybrid?
Well, in defense of this practice, I know you know that older bikes that were destined for racing were built with wider tire clearances and more forgiving geometry than later more purpose-built race bikes. For those who like to tinker and futz around with parts and frames, it's not a question of why, but why not. Anyway, I know you know this...

Back to this bike -- it sounds like it would suit the OP's needs very well.
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Old 07-02-20, 06:47 AM
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I have its stablemate, the Alumicross. Wonderful bikes. Ride it in its hybrid form, and if you get the itch for a drop-bar road bike, its geometry will gladly accommodate a conversion. And there's always N+1.
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Old 07-02-20, 12:10 PM
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Originally Posted by PugRider View Post
I have its stablemate, the Alumicross. Wonderful bikes. Ride it in its hybrid form, and if you get the itch for a drop-bar road bike, its geometry will gladly accommodate a conversion. And there's always N+1.
+1.
In the early years of this century, I invented gravel bikes...I just didn't know it .
Up here in farm and forest Maine, it's farm roads, skidder roads, cow trails, ect. I was teaching my kids to ride, and their bikes were ATBs, of course. I wanted something I could ride on these unimproved 'roads' like a road bike. I acquired a '91 Triplecross frame and fork and built it up with drops. It's been updated several times, but currently looks like:






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Last edited by top506; 07-02-20 at 04:07 PM.
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Old 07-02-20, 02:42 PM
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WhatTheDelromi , I much prefer flat or upright bars when commuting in traffic. It gives you better peripheral vision and you have quick access to the brakes. I had a drop bar mountain bike conversion I was using for commuting here in Seattle. I liked it for longer rides, but I changed back to flat bars.

You have a few options if you want to do longer rides on a flat bar bike and need more hand positions. You can do bar ends, get a threadless stem adapter and do crazy bars (https://velo-orange.com/products/crazy-bars-1) or you can make your own crazy bars on the cheap by putting the bar ends in the middle of your flat bar.

TL;DR: IMO, go with a flat bar if you are mostly using the bike for commutes of 30-45 minutes.

Oh, and I'm 6' and ride a 22.5" frame and it might even be a little small for me. I think 23" will be a little small for you unless you have short legs.
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Old 07-02-20, 02:54 PM
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Depends on the frame, riser bars may not get you up high enough or it just looks weird. I like top506's approach but you may need a tall Technomic to get that fit right. I did the same thing with my 91 Crossroads and it's comfy, maybe a bit short in the stem for my arms.
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Old 07-02-20, 04:07 PM
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Originally Posted by clubman View Post
I like top506's approach but you may need a tall Technomic to get that fit right. I did the same thing with my 91 Crossroads and it's comfy, maybe a bit short in the stem for my arms.
I went with the short stem because the Triplecross had a very long top tube in relation to the seat tube. 54x57cm maybe.

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Old 07-02-20, 07:13 PM
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Same thing here. I used my road bike fit but I'm over the pedals a bit more.
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