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Quick release?

Old 07-27-20, 01:09 AM
  #1  
E.blan
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Quick release?

Does anyone know if it's possible to add a quick release to existing wheel that doesn't have it? Would make things very easier for traveling
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Old 07-27-20, 02:32 AM
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juvela
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-----

a quick release requires a hollow axle

so if the present axle is solid one would need to replace it with a hollow one in order to convert the hub to quick release

if you do not wish to do this one option might be to change from hex nuts for holding the wheel in the frame to wing nuts

this would permit you to remove and re-insert the front wheel without tools...

-----
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Old 07-27-20, 07:40 AM
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The answer is, usually, yes. You will also need to address drop thickness concerns, should they present themselves. This wee bit of advice applies to derailleur hubs, not those of an internally geared nature. This Torpado is an example of switching from nutted to quick release...

I had to be sure that the qr axle did not protrude too far into/past the drop thickness. I also had to choose between filing the front drops to accept an axle that is slightly larger, in diameter, than the qr one or file the front drops. I always choose file the axle...


The concern here is the thickness of the pressed steel drop, which is generally considerably thinner than most forged drops...


The drop thickness is not the problem as the thickness is increased with the non-integral derailleur hanger...
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Old 07-27-20, 08:00 AM
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I've done this several times with bikes I was planning to sell. The lbs here used to have three bins of used, inexpensive axles. They would cut/file the axle once I selected one, all for $5.

Those days are gone, and it now costs me $20 or more for a new axle found online that I need to cut down myself. I only buy road bikes with hollow axles now.

For a keeper road bike, I think it's a good idea to have a quick release on each wheel. Once you know the threading, look for Wheels Manufacturing branded axles. Tighten a couple nuts (like your cone and locknut) inside your cut line so you can clean the threads easily after the cut by simply unthreading the nuts. A hacksaw works great.
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Old 07-27-20, 01:52 PM
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I've done this a number of times. What I do is take a nut from the original solid axle and then go to a bike shop pr co-op and try to thread that nut onto a quick-release axle. When I find a quick-release axle that the nut fits I buy the axle and quick-release skewer. Then it's a relatively simple matter to transfer the parts from t he solid axle to the quick-release axle. Doing that way, I'm positive that the cones match the cups in the hub or hubs.

Cheers
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Old 07-27-20, 03:40 PM
  #6  
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Of course you can. Tullio was selling quick release conversion kits as early as 1936 through the Rene Bancal catalog. 56 Francs.
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Old 07-27-20, 04:23 PM
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Yep, done it numerous times, grab one of these and a quick release and you're in business...
https://www.huskybicycles.com/bicycl...w-qr-rear.html
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Old 07-27-20, 04:41 PM
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I was a very common operation once. It can be fast and simple. It's easier if your front hub uses a 9x1 axle. If so, you can reuse your cones and locknuts, etc. Sometimes front solid hubs were a little bigger (9.5 x 26 IIRC). If this is the case you would also need to purchase compatible cones, washer and locknuts, in addition to the new hollow axle and QR skewer.

Needless to say, if the current axle isn't 9x1, the operation is much more of a hassle. I'd strongly advise you to measure the axle diameter and threads before starting anything.
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Old 07-27-20, 06:18 PM
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Wing nuts are way less hassle and work perfectly well. In fact that's what my Raleigh Record came with stock in 1968.
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Old 07-27-20, 06:26 PM
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Wing nuts are way less hassle and work perfectly well.
Wing nuts do work, if you are strong enough to work them. As for quick release being more hassle - it would take a lot to convince me to switch back to wing nuts or hex nuts.
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