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Miyata 1000, Early vs Late 80's?

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Miyata 1000, Early vs Late 80's?

Old 08-03-20, 05:41 AM
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Miyata 1000, Early vs Late 80's?

I've read that the later 80's Miyata 1000 are more desirable. Looks like groupset is a bit better.
Miyata experts, is a 1980 undesirable? I may look at one, would like to know more.
Thanks,
Dave
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Old 08-03-20, 05:59 AM
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When I look at a bike, all I really see is the frame. I ask myself if the frame is worthy.

Are the later 80's frames still made in Japan?
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Old 08-03-20, 07:25 AM
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I just recently purchased an 89 so have a little insight on just that one. Others will say to purchase any that you see, and I agree. 1989 was I believe the first year for the freehub. It’s a 7 speed hyperglide with first gen 105 index shifters. Gears and shifting aren’t that important, but I believe the main advantage was that the axle on the freehub is stronger than a freewheel axle, thus better if one loads it up. I can’t claim anything either way, this is just what I have read. Axle spacing is 135mm. 89 was made in Japan.

One other thing is the 89 has the first gen 105 brake levers with return springs in the levers so that the canti springs can be Set lighter. I can say that I love the feel of these brakes. All will tell you to not pass on ANY 1000, as all are great, and changes can be made to them. From pictures, I think the earlier ones are prettier. Research may show you different brakes and braze-ons and such over the years.
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Old 08-03-20, 07:40 AM
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You should totally check out the 'Show Your Miyata 1000' thread. Show Your Miyata 1000! That'll give you an idea of what the differences are- if not from "year to year" but the differences in an 1980 M1000 to a 1990 M1000LT.

As far as 'desirable' goes- it does sort of go along with what J.Higgins said- the frame. The tubing, the geometry, the construction, the braze ons... That's the stuff that no component change is going to get you. It also goes to what is desirable to you... a pristine time machine- or a base for a kickass bike.

IMO- The bikes start to get interesting around 1986. Not only does it have the full compliments of braze ons, but it also looks REALLY nice AND comes with a totally solid group.

Mine is a 1990 that I replaced a lot of the DX stuff with XT and XTR.

M1000LT by Dave The Golden Boy, on Flickr
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Old 08-03-20, 08:00 AM
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Thanks, I feel like I have a better idea now.
Seems like an early one would have to be pretty cheap to be worth the upgrades on the drivetrain.
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Old 08-03-20, 09:02 AM
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Originally Posted by daverup View Post
Thanks, I feel like I have a better idea now.
Seems like an early one would have to be pretty cheap to be worth the upgrades on the drivetrain.
There's the 2nd bottle braze ons and mid-fork eyelets that are missing from the earlier ones. IMO- the bottle cage is a big deal, and the mid fork would be a big deal if you're actually touring on it.

The Splined Triple Butted tubing can be a big deal, if you're into that sort of thing. I think the STB tubing is what makes my M1000LT much more beefy than my other touring bikes. This is the bike I would choose to haul a load over the country.
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Old 08-03-20, 09:10 AM
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Originally Posted by The Golden Boy View Post
There's the 2nd bottle braze ons and mid-fork eyelets that are missing from the earlier ones. IMO- the bottle cage is a big deal, and the mid fork would be a big deal if you're actually touring on it.

The Splined Triple Butted tubing can be a big deal, if you're into that sort of thing. I think the STB tubing is what makes my M1000LT much more beefy than my other touring bikes. This is the bike I would choose to haul a load over the country.
I noticed the 2nd bottle braze ons were missing on the 1980, thanks for pointing out the differences there.
I've been going through the "Show us your Miyata 1000" page, still working my way through it.
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Old 08-03-20, 10:36 AM
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Low rider pannier mounts on the fork didn’t start until mid 80s. I like touring bikes that have those and it would guide my decision when choosing between model years.
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Old 08-03-20, 11:00 AM
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The splined tubing came in around 86 I think.
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Old 08-03-20, 03:34 PM
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Originally Posted by John Nolan View Post
The splined tubing came in around 86 I think.
Had to be earlier than that. My ‘85 six ten is STB, so I’d imagine it was used for the 1000 for a year or two first? 🤔
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Old 08-03-20, 05:59 PM
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Originally Posted by stardognine View Post
Had to be earlier than that. My ‘85 six ten is STB, so I’d imagine it was used for the 1000 for a year or two first? 🤔
Hmm...the 85 catalogue just says triple butted, and the sticker on my 86 610 says triple butted (but not splined), just like the catalogue. Guess you got lucky!
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Old 08-03-20, 06:24 PM
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Originally Posted by John Nolan View Post
Hmm...the 85 catalogue just says triple butted, and the sticker on my 86 610 says triple butted (but not splined), just like the catalogue. Guess you got lucky!
My mistake, I guess my mind read something in, that wasn’t there. 🤔🙄😉
Here’s my actual tubing sticker.
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Old 08-03-20, 07:25 PM
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I had to check profile to find out what year my 610 was.
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Old 08-03-20, 08:32 PM
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Originally Posted by J.Higgins View Post
When I look at a bike, all I really see is the frame. I ask myself if the frame is worthy.

Are the later 80's frames still made in Japan?
I was told on these forums my 1990 is made in Japan. IIRC they also said all 1000s were made in Japan.
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Old 08-03-20, 08:44 PM
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Originally Posted by rgvg View Post
I was told on these forums my 1990 is made in Japan. IIRC they also said all 1000s were made in Japan.
As opposed to? Somehow I thought all Miyatas were made in Japan. 🤔
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Old 08-03-20, 09:00 PM
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Originally Posted by stardognine View Post
As opposed to? Somehow I thought all Miyatas were made in Japan. 🤔
there was a point after 1990 that they moved (some?) manufacturing to Taiwan. Miyata held out as long as they responsibly could.
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Old 08-04-20, 12:43 AM
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Mine was an '81. It was a good bike; but not a great bike. I couldn't ride it anymore after doing series of side-by-side test rides vs my '88 Voyageur (swapping the wheel sets back and forth, so as to remove that big variable). The Schwinn was a better bike each time, so I didn't see the point of keeping the Miyata. Schwinn Columbus Tenax > whatever cro-moly Miyata was using in '81; just a bit livelier. Maybe I should have tried riding them both loaded, but I don't think either would compare favorably with my C-dale in that respect. The more modern Shimano running gear on the Schwinn Voyageur was part of the equation - pretty significant leap in technology between '81 Cyclone and '88 Deore. And the lovely, classic-looking Apex crank on the Miyata was a half-step setup, which I couldn't learn to love. Sure, I could have modernized and changed around a bunch of stuff, I guess...

Too many classic touring bikes in the stable, ugh; what's a guy to do?

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Old 08-04-20, 01:03 AM
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Originally Posted by daverup View Post
Thanks, I feel like I have a better idea now.
Seems like an early one would have to be pretty cheap to be worth the upgrades on the drivetrain.
What are you looking for in this Miyata 1000? They are all great bikes, as every owner will attest. ( Edit: OK, Lascauxcaveman won’t jump fully on to that band wagon^^^)

If the desire is for a “loaded tourer” with full panniers front and rear to camp your way across weeks of roads, then the 1000LT might be the better version with its longer chainstays, and, I suspect, beefier tubing. (And Tim ^^^ is correct about something like a fat-tubed Cannondale or Klein as the superior loaded tourer.)

But if you’re looking for something a bit sportier, the non-LT versions have a lot to offer. I had an afternoon of very pleasurable riding on RiddleOfSteel ’s former 1982 Miyata 1000 in comparison with my own Marinoni SLX Sports Tourer, discovering that they were remarkably similar in handling, climbing, descending, and generally spirited joy of riding. Not surprising when we compared frame geometry between them.

All 1000’s have cantilever brakes so fatter tires are easy, but those early ones feature narrow post spacing which can be a challenge. Search for ROS’s write up on his bike and how he resolved that. An advantage of those early ones: if they originally had 27” wheels, then there’s more room for fenders over 700C wheels.

Hopefully you’ve already looked through the Miyata catalogs at the geometry changes to that model over the years.

Drivetrain upgrades can be extremely rewarding IMHO. Just about any higher quality bike from those eras responds wonderfully to more modern components, if that’s what you’re after. (There’s this huge thread in C&V showing thousands of such conversions.) My own ‘79 Miyata 912 is now in its fourth major configuration - 8-speed Ergo shifting for the last two versions plus a full low trail rando front end now. Had another lovely ride on it today.

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