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1977 PX10LE Frame Resto

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1977 PX10LE Frame Resto

Old 08-03-20, 02:00 PM
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velo352
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1977 PX10LE Frame Resto

Frame Restoration for PX10LE



I picked this up recently and got it down to the frame and fork. I’ve restored a few Peugeots before, but only did a bit of paint touch up. Recently, I decided to strip a U08 of its paint by sanding with a dremel (this has been difficult, especially with all the small areas). It looks like it was originally the silver version and someone sprayed a thin coat of brown paint that is now coming off. It’s so minimal it dissolved with a small amount of PB spray. To investigate, I took a small blade and scraped a bit of the paint off and clean steel was under. Rust is mostly superficial, not much I could see inside the tube, but the chrome chain stays are where the majority’s located.



My main question in the post is how I should strip, repair the rust, and then paint. I plan on keeping the bike for myself and painting a custom color (if this bike is more valuable in an original Peugeot variant, please advise). I’m not sure how I would plate the chain stays so they will most likely be repainted.



Doing my research, I’ve come across oxalic acid, but am unsure if this is the best option. I’d like to strip this brown paint, sand down any rust, then prime and paint. I plan on spraying the Boeshield rust protection for interior. How should I remove the paint (sanding, razor) and the rust? I have Naval gel, a spray that converts it into a paintable surface, etc. My preference would be to strip it down to the steel.



I like some of the colors from Spray Bike (thinking the Cold-Zinc primer would work on this steel frame, and then finish with a Satin clear coat over decals).








I’m excited to post the progress of this restoration. Thanks in advanced for the advice!
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Old 08-03-20, 02:09 PM
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This was in the valuation forum earlier, right? I'm glad you're doing a restoration. This bike likely could use an oxalic acid bath. One question is whether this bike has already been repainted since this is an unusual color scheme for a Peugeot. You'll want to look at the brochures to see if this was an original color or not.

Evaporust will work for all the bits and pieces. I like a small bucket with a lid for the evaporust.

Kool stop makes mafac pad replacements. You likely will want to go with a leather saddle as a replacement. Brooks is the most common choice but you may prefer a selle anatomica. It has longer rails than a Brooks and will make the fore aft adjustment easier.

Velocals is a good source for replacement decals.

Hold on to the old ferrules. You may find that they have a different dimension than the ones readily available today.

Last edited by bikemig; 08-03-20 at 02:26 PM.
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Old 08-03-20, 02:24 PM
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I think an oxalic acid bath is a good option for this frame, whatever else you do with it. I use a long plastic under-bed storage bin, and have to put the frame in three or four different times: Top tube immersed, down tube immersed, seat stays immersed; chainstays immersed. Put the fork in once Would remove as much rust by wire brushing or the like as I could first. May or may not remove the paint before the oxalic acid bath. Use my bike stand to hold the frame in position. Others build a big bath and am sure you've seen that, but I haven't wanted to create something that large.

Bath might also be good for some other small steel components (but not aluminum as someone recently reminded me!!!).

Have not seen a PX10 that color before, yet it doesn't like like a repaint!

I tend to remove paint with a combination of a chemical stripper, and when that is cleaned off and dry remove the rest with a a wire wheel or nylon abrasive wheel attachment for a hand drill, then perhaps some sandpaper.
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Old 08-03-20, 02:43 PM
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If you need to remove a later sprayed overcoat and see what's underneath, you could try Goof Off or plain Acetone (Goof Off, at least the one I was using Pro Strength, is mostly Acetone). Should take off many hardware store type spray paints. Test in a hidden location first, like under the BB, in case it takes off more than you want. Wet a paper towel, and rub gently. Check the paper towel for paint residue if you don't see much effect on the frame (if there's thick spray paint, could take a layer of paper towel for each little section). WD-40 also took a bit of the spray off to see what was underneath (but not much on the areas where this frame was primer sprayed first), if you have something like that laying around.

Now if you're talking stripping all the paint, just paint stripper is what you'd want. Took me a few rounds on my latest attempt, started with ~1" brush for initial stripping and finished with ~1/4" brush as certain spots were stubborn or harder to get. Last bits of primer etc came off best with some 400 grit with a very light touch to get to a bare frame state.
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Old 08-03-20, 02:54 PM
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...I do restorations on bikes like this every couple of years, and in this case, if there is not a problem with heavy internal rust, I'd skip doing the OA bath, and simply strip, sand, prime, and repaint and rebadge the exterior. After all that's done, (or before you start on it,) you can coat the interior of the frame tubes with some oil based rust inhibitor. I use the stuff that comes in a spray can, that they sell at home depot, made by Rustoleum. If you do the internal treatment first, give it a few days to dry before you start working on paint. If you do it after, give tha paint a couple of weeks to cure before you go at it with the internal oil, because it's messy as it drains.

I use a self etching primer (also by Rustoleum, also at Home Dept in a spray can.) You get much better adhesion with a self etching primer, and it solves a lot off problems on a surface that's bee rusted and sanded previously.

You can use almost anything for a color coat, but if you want bright colors at the finish, it's better to overspray the grey sefl etching primer with a white or silver undercoat before you do the color coat. Primer color directly afects how your color coat looks at the end. You are much better off using a urethane clear paint over the color coat and decals as your final. SprayMaxx 2K comes in a gloss clear glaomour, for extra shiny, but I think they also make a matte satin one if that's your preference.

Here's an older French bike I repainted recently, using these paints and methodology. It, too, had chrome socks on the fork and stays that was shot, so rough sanding and priming was the answer for me.
.
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Old 08-03-20, 03:12 PM
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I'm going to be the bent fork guy this time. The top tube looks to be bent behind the head tube and the fork is very straight to my eyes.
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Old 08-03-20, 03:46 PM
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I'd also make sure the seat post comes out. That one looks really rusty.
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Old 08-04-20, 01:08 AM
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If this is to be your main rider, be advised that these LE models (as well as the E models post-1972) have as quick steering as you will find in a production model, with frame angles in the neighborhood of 75-76 degrees.

Really, these are like the peak of twitchy-ness, so perhaps consider if the frame's sizing will allow you to adjust stem length and hence weight distribution in a way that is favorable to what little stability this bike might exhibit on the road.

I love my LE, it's a real blast when ridden aggressively. But it's not a bike where one can just grab for the water bottle (or even change hand positions) any old time.
Where these bikes shine is in paceline/sprinting battle, and on steep, "technical" climbing terrain, where frequent shifts in and out of the saddle can allow the rider a better chance at gapping the group (picture the mid-70's Peugeot squad leading the peloton and their yellow jersey contender Thevenet onto the alpe d'huez).
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Old 08-04-20, 06:11 AM
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I mentioned this on the evaluations thread, but it bears repeating - for the components, you want Evapo-Rust, available at all sorts of hardware places - I usually get mine a Tractor Supply or Harbor Freight, depends on who has it on sale. It won't harm the alloy parts and it will remove a crazy amount of rust. I first used it on a c.1972 French Liberia that had spent year outdoors in coastal South Carolina, and it emerged looking dramatically better.
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Old 08-04-20, 06:14 AM
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Originally Posted by rustystrings61 View Post
I mentioned this on the evaluations thread, but it bears repeating - for the components, you want Evapo-Rust, available at all sorts of hardware places - I usually get mine a Tractor Supply or Harbor Freight, depends on who has it on sale. It won't harm the alloy parts and it will remove a crazy amount of rust. I first used it on a c.1972 French Liberia that had spent year outdoors in coastal South Carolina, and it emerged looking dramatically better.
yeah Iím impressed with evaporust as well. And itís not as dangerous to use as some of the alternatives.
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Old 08-04-20, 06:17 AM
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Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
yeah Iím impressed with evaporust as well. And itís not as dangerous to use as some of the alternatives.
What he said. I forgot to mention that one of Evapo-Rust's advertised uses is to undo rust damage to cast-iron cookware - so yes, you CAN save Me-Maw's precious cast-iron cornbread-makin' skillet after some villain runs it through the dishwasher!
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Old 08-04-20, 06:18 AM
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Originally Posted by rustystrings61 View Post
I mentioned this on the evaluations thread, but it bears repeating - for the components, you want Evapo-Rust, available at all sorts of hardware places - I usually get mine a Tractor Supply or Harbor Freight, depends on who has it on sale. It won't harm the alloy parts and it will remove a crazy amount of rust. I first used it on a c.1972 French Liberia that had spent year outdoors in coastal South Carolina, and it emerged looking dramatically better.
+1 - works wonders
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Old 08-04-20, 02:11 PM
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It was in the valuation forms earlier. Thanks everyone for your responses! think I'm going to skip the OA and work with Naval Jelly. The rust is mostly light except for the stays. I've heard it can leave a residue, any tips on getting that off?

Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
I use a self etching primer (also by Rustoleum, also at Home Dept in a spray can.) You get much better adhesion with a self etching primer, and it solves a lot off problems on a surface that's bee rusted and sanded previously.

You can use almost anything for a color coat, but if you want bright colors at the finish, it's better to overspray the grey sefl etching primer with a white or silver undercoat before you do the color coat. Primer color directly afects how your color coat looks at the end. You are much better off using a urethane clear paint over the color coat and decals as your final. SprayMaxx 2K comes in a gloss clear glaomour, for extra shiny, but I think they also make a matte satin one if that's your preference.
Thanks for the tip with the primer...Also, I have heard for a good finish to use the 2K coat. Can you buy it locally or do you have to order it?
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Old 08-04-20, 02:14 PM
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And to the most mentioned solution...I bought some Evaporust. I've been wanting to get some of this stuff for a while an am excited to try it out. Can you use it multiple times?

Vinegar has worked for me in the past, but I hear this is much better.
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Old 08-04-20, 02:29 PM
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Originally Posted by velo352 View Post
And to the most mentioned solution...I bought some Evaporust. I've been wanting to get some of this stuff for a while an am excited to try it out. Can you use it multiple times?

Vinegar has worked for me in the past, but I hear this is much better.
You CAN re-use Evapo-Rust. I use cone style coffee filters and a funnel to pour it back into the jug after I'm done with it. The filter captures all sorts of solids, and I re-use the liquid until it doesn't work anymore. That hasn't happened yet, btw.
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Old 08-04-20, 02:31 PM
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I just use a small plastic bucket with a lid. I keep using it until it stops working and that does take a while. I used one batch all last summer and threw it out in the spring before I started on some new jobs.
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Old 08-04-20, 02:42 PM
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Originally Posted by velo352 View Post
I



Thanks for the tip with the primer...Also, I have heard for a good finish to use the 2K coat. Can you buy it locally or do you have to order it?
...if you go to a place that is a specialty auto paints store, they usually have it in stock. They also make a primer, which you can buy at the same places, which works very well. I only use the older tech self etching stuff because I'm usually overpainting it with white to get a brighter color in the finished product, and I can't find the SprayMaxx in white. Also it runs about 20 bucks a can. So in my case it makes no sense. But if you can be satisfied with a beige primer, and plan to paint over that with whatever color, then apply decals, then finish with SprayMaxx clear, it's probably the best choice and least labor intensive series of steps.

There are auto paint specialty stores everywhere there are people crashing cars and dong body work repairs.They sell it online, too, but I usually try to buy it locally.
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Old 08-04-20, 09:16 PM
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Originally Posted by velo352 View Post
And to the most mentioned solution...I bought some Evaporust. I've been wanting to get some of this stuff for a while an am excited to try it out. Can you use it multiple times?

Vinegar has worked for me in the past, but I hear this is much better.
+(N+1) Evaporust is solid. Many have provided tips on use/ re-sue. The pros at Evaporust say it's finished when the solution turns brown. I recommend that you de-grime anything you are going to soak-- no sense adding more gunk to the evaporust solution.

I've used it to soak bike frames in the manner described by KenNC but I used disposable wallpaper trays (long and narrow; ~32" x 4" x 6"; < $10) on the recommendation of someone else here on the forum. If you use leakproof, hole-free ziplock bags filled with water to take up extra volume in the tray (don't dilute the evaporust), you can cut down on the volume necessary for soaking by quite a bit.
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Old 08-05-20, 06:07 AM
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Originally Posted by agnewton View Post
+(N+1) Evaporust is solid. Many have provided tips on use/ re-sue. The pros at Evaporust say it's finished when the solution turns brown. I recommend that you de-grime anything you are going to soak-- no sense adding more gunk to the evaporust solution.

I've used it to soak bike frames in the manner described by KenNC but I used disposable wallpaper trays (long and narrow; ~32" x 4" x 6"; < $10) on the recommendation of someone else here on the forum. If you use leakproof, hole-free ziplock bags filled with water to take up extra volume in the tray (don't dilute the evaporust), you can cut down on the volume necessary for soaking by quite a bit.
You soak the frame in evaporust using wallpaper trays or do you use oxalic acid?

It's tough to find a storage bin large enough to hold an entire bike frame which would be ideal. If you end up moving the frame around, a wallpaper tray sounds good.
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Old 08-05-20, 07:03 AM
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Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
It's tough to find a storage bin large enough to hold an entire bike frame which would be ideal...
For OA baths, I made a wooden form in the shape of an elongated pentagon, just right to fit a 58 cm diamond frame with 2" margins, using 8" wide strips of discarded plywood and Stanley angle brackets bent to the correct angles. Into this, I lay a sheet of thick pool/pond liner that you can buy at any home improvement store. Works a charm, easy to store, easy to clean.
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Old 08-05-20, 07:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Narhay View Post
I'm going to be the bent fork guy this time. The top tube looks to be bent behind the head tube and the fork is very straight to my eyes.
I can't say that I see it. I will guess that this is a prior re-paint, though.
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Old 08-05-20, 07:28 AM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by Narhay View Post
I'm going to be the bent fork guy this time. The top tube looks to be bent behind the head tube and the fork is very straight to my eyes.
The PX-10LE had really aggressive front end geometry compared to earlier PXs, typically with a steeper seat tube angle as well. That was coupled with a fork with very little rake. I had a '73 PX-10 with those sorts of angles, as well as a '74 PX-10LE. I also note that both of those bikes had odd, hand-stamped serial numbers. The '73 had the small holes usually used for fitting the serial number plate typically riveted on underneath, the '74 shows no signs of such.
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Old 08-05-20, 10:14 AM
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rustystrings61 that is a nice example of the 73 PX10E, the year that they returned to using the fancy lugs but suddenly appearing with super-steep angles.

I bought one is the smaller 56cm size that I was able to fit a 10cm stem on, which did help put a little more weight on the front tire.
Together with the lower bar position relative to the saddle, the bike can at least be ridden at high speeds, but it's still nervous when road conditions become less than smooth.
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Old 08-05-20, 07:43 PM
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Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
You soak the frame in evaporust using wallpaper trays or do you use oxalic acid?

It's tough to find a storage bin large enough to hold an entire bike frame which would be ideal. If you end up moving the frame around, a wallpaper tray sounds good.
I used evaporust in the wallpaper trays. One gallon of Evaporust + some quart-sized, leak-proof, ziplock bags filled with water creates enough volume to submerge the frame tubes in evaporust. I have used it to soak the head, top, and down tubes as well as the forks (laid on their sides). The ones I have are a wee bit too narrow to fit the rear triangle (OLD= 126), but narrower OLD might fare better or double the effort with half-submerged tubes.

For the seat tube, I usually use super fine steel wool (#0000) looped around a coat hanger and a drill. Later, the same contraption with a marine greased, plastic scrub pad to coat the seat tube. If you can find the right size rubber stopper, you could probably plug the seat tube at the BB and fill it up with evaporust.

I'd like to try an OA bath because I think the OA crystals are cheaper than evaporust, but I haven't found (and haven't looked too hard) for good information about what concentration OA to use and the exposure time. So, guess I'll have to do some research.
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