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Nishiki Olympic 12 Speed?

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Nishiki Olympic 12 Speed?

Old 08-07-20, 07:01 PM
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kaiserschmarrn
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Nishiki Olympic 12 Speed?

Does anyone know anything about these bikes?

Would anyone guess a value for one of these in very good to excellent shape?

Thanks,

Danny
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Old 08-07-20, 10:23 PM
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ended up picking up a 1988 nishiki olympic (steel) frame, fork, vintage cinelli handlebars, campy seatpost (and some unused in the bulid campy hoods, campy index shifters and campy brake levers)
about 4 months ago for a little less than $350 including shipping. paint/decals pretty good, proceeded to slap on campy potenza and some conti gp 5000's, all told, the buy/build was about $2k.
a little pricey but i've been riding the hell out of it and i have 3 other road bikes. upgraded from a 12-speed width with a 10-gear, 11-30 cassette on it which comes in handy around here.
couldn't be more pleased with the ride. beats the hell out of my 1985 pinarello treviso steel ride.







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Old 08-07-20, 10:30 PM
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The Olympic 12 stayed out as a model produced at a new to WestCoast Cycle Supply mfg. it was of a different look- keying off of what Centurion was doing at the time,

A better spec than the typical Olympic that preceded it, which faded out. So it was 3rd up. The Taiwan produced Sport being the lowest, then the Custom Sport.

visible condition and Mechanical revival and size really are the biggest influencers on price.
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Old 08-08-20, 02:39 PM
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Originally Posted by ooga-booga View Post
ended up picking up a 1988 nishiki olympic (steel) frame, fork, vintage cinelli handlebars, campy seatpost (and some unused in the bulid campy hoods, campy index shifters and campy brake levers)
about 4 months ago for a little less than $350 including shipping. paint/decals pretty good, proceeded to slap on campy potenza and some conti gp 5000's, all told, the buy/build was about $2k.
a little pricey but i've been riding the hell out of it and i have 3 other road bikes. upgraded from a 12-speed width with a 10-gear, 11-30 cassette on it which comes in handy around here.
couldn't be more pleased with the ride. beats the hell out of my 1985 pinarello treviso steel ride.






The one that I found is asking $245.00. This is a vintage that I am interested in because it marries the best of today with the best of yesterday. The cables are largely hidden, the Cro Mo lugged frames are a throwback to yesteryear. The new road bikes are great (I have one, a 2020 Trek Emonda ALR 5), but I think that they have lost some of the elegance of the bikes of yesteryear.

Danny
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Old 08-08-20, 03:10 PM
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That might be a good or not so good price, depending of the cosmetic, mechanical and local market conditions. Beyond that, the life of the Olympic 12 spanned a decade, so you can find them with a wide variety of tubing and components, which also impacts price. The bottom line is that we require more information, preferably with photographs.
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Old 08-08-20, 03:19 PM
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Originally Posted by kaiserschmarrn View Post
The one that I found is asking $245.00. This is a vintage that I am interested in because it marries the best of today with the best of yesterday. The cables are largely hidden, the Cro Mo lugged frames are a throwback to yesteryear. The new road bikes are great (I have one, a 2020 Trek Emonda ALR 5), but I think that they have lost some of the elegance of the bikes of yesteryear.

Danny
agreed.
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Old 08-08-20, 03:38 PM
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I am amazed by how much the Olympic improved and evolved through the 1970s, from its humble beginnings as a very overweight Peugeot UO-8 fighter.
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Old 08-09-20, 02:47 PM
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Originally Posted by John E View Post
I am amazed by how much the Olympic improved and evolved through the 1970s, from its humble beginnings as a very overweight Peugeot UO-8 fighter.
The Toyota Corolla also made a march up the market, Tercel, then Yaris, Echo to name a few all followed along below it as it went upscale.
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Old 08-11-20, 07:12 PM
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The Olympic never really marched up the market. Rather, like other lower level bicycles, it benefited from the trickle down technology in tubing and components. As the price differential in a product range grew, marketers introduced new models to fill the gaps, so there wasn't too big a price jump between models. It was one of the prime reasons for the increasing number of components groups. While new models appeared below the Olympic, it never really shifted much from its original upper entry position.
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Old 08-12-20, 02:54 PM
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Just to throw out my 2 cents, I have a 1986 Olympic (non model 12) that I bought new that year. I think it was just under $300 not sure but I still somewhere have the receipt. Mine is double butted in the triangle. It came with Shimano "Light Action" short cage RD and ratchet down tube shifters, fluted alloy seatposts, Dia-Compe side pulls and 700 x 25 clinchers. Mine is in very good condition, paint is blue and white. I put SRAM aero brake levers and dual pivot brakes on it and new saddle other than that it's as is for the factory. If I'm using a large freewheel I will put a modern long cage RD on.


For what it is it's a decent bike. The paint while in good condition is a little brittle and always has been. Hit it with something it will chip. I have tried the light action short cage with SIS shifters and it will work. Light action was one of Shimano's first attempts at SIS but the bike uses ratchet friction shifters.


At the time when I bought it I rode a lot in group rides and organized events from 1986-1991 during that time I only ever saw one other Olympic. Bad timing maybe. But the bike is solid no leaks or creeks and was easily one of the best value purchases I have ever made. I still use the bike but mostly on my fluid trainer. The geometry of the frame is in my view closer to a race frame than tour so I think it's a tad bit uncomfortable on long pleasure rides.


Although I have long sense paid for the bike and have got my money out of her I don't think it's a good frame to put a ton of money into for upgrades. The Olympic 12 is probably a better frame than mine but still not quite there, it's a good honest bike but as others have said it's at the upper level of entry level I think that is the best way to describe it.
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Old 08-13-20, 09:26 AM
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Wonderful looking 1988 model. I have a blue and white Olympic from the same year. Mine has a Biopace chain ring. I found it in a bike shop a couple of years ago for $150. It was for sale in the shop for a couple of years. It's one of my favorite bikes.
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Old 08-13-20, 04:21 PM
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Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
The Olympic never really marched up the market. Rather, like other lower level bicycles, it benefited from the trickle down technology in tubing and components. As the price differential in a product range grew, marketers introduced new models to fill the gaps, so there wasn't too big a price jump between models. It was one of the prime reasons for the increasing number of components groups. While new models appeared below the Olympic, it never really shifted much from its original upper entry position.
Point taken, but my point was that a ca. 1980 Olympic is vastly superior to one from the early 1970s.
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Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324
Capo: 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
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Old 08-13-20, 11:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Todd Groesbeck View Post
Wonderful looking 1988 model. I have a blue and white Olympic from the same year. Mine has a Biopace chain ring. I found it in a bike shop a couple of years ago for $150. It was for sale in the shop for a couple of years. It's one of my favorite bikes.
pics please when you hit the requisite number to post pics. would love to see it in blue.
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Old 08-15-20, 01:24 PM
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Can you find brake lever hoods that might have been on the Nishiki bikes that I mention, or even the same kind of brake levers that do not have shift function and route the cables under the grip tape that give the "cableless look"?

Danny
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Old 08-18-20, 10:49 AM
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Originally Posted by ooga-booga View Post
pics please when you hit the requisite number to post pics. would love to see it in blue.
My Olympic. A 1988 model.


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Old 08-18-20, 11:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Todd Groesbeck View Post
My Olympic. A 1988 model.


nice. id ride that.
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Old 08-18-20, 01:42 PM
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Originally Posted by kaiserschmarrn View Post
Can you find brake lever hoods that might have been on the Nishiki bikes that I mention, or even the same kind of brake levers that do not have shift function and route the cables under the grip tape that give the "cableless look"?

Danny
Those are "aero" (really just a catch-word, they're not particularly aerodynamic) brake levers that you're referring to. Do you have the bike you're posting about, or are you thinking of buying it? If you have it, can you post some pics?
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Old 08-18-20, 02:30 PM
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Really nice bike, thanks for sharing that. I especially like the Blue and White paint job, better than what is on the one I am looking at. I also like the front fork better on yours.

Danny


Originally Posted by Todd Groesbeck View Post
My Olympic. A 1988 model.



Last edited by kaiserschmarrn; 08-18-20 at 03:19 PM.
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Old 08-18-20, 02:44 PM
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Originally Posted by madpogue View Post
Those are "aero" (really just a catch-word, they're not particularly aerodynamic) brake levers that you're referring to. Do you have the bike you're posting about, or are you thinking of buying it? If you have it, can you post some pics?
I have not bought the bike. I have been going back and forth on doing it, and really have not had the chance to buy it, even if I had made a decision. I have in my life, bought some products where parts were proprietary, no longer available, etc., so I am just checking these things out first. The one I am interested in seems to have the same brake levers as the nice Blue and White one posted, based on the similar look, especially the black (plastic?) butting up to the front of the brake hood. The ones on the one I am looking at look to be ripped, one of them, anyway.

https://imgur.com/a/BgVnLx9

Danny
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Old 08-18-20, 05:04 PM
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The bicycle that the OP is considering is the 1987 version. It's a nice, upper entry level model but nothing special. It's modern enough that it has a butted CrMo main triangle and conveniences like 700C wheelset, indexed shifting and SLR brakes.

Buying a 3+ decade old bicycle will always be an issue with finding exact replacement parts, though Ebay has made a huge difference, but there shouldn't be any components that wouldn't have modern, compatible replacements.

If it's still available almost a month later, the seller is asking too much.
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Old 08-19-20, 06:36 AM
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Do any of these Nishiki Olympic bikes have aluminum front forks like some other bikes of the era I have seen?

Danny
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Old 08-19-20, 09:54 PM
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What I ended up with instead was this;

https://cleveland.craigslist.org/bik...178547228.html

https://images.craigslist.org/00F0F_95e5sMZdlXq_0CI0t2_1200x900.jpg

The only unfortunate part is that the guy said it was a 56cm frame. From my measurements, it comes out at 58cm (23"). I am 5'9-1/8" tall.

Danny

Last edited by kaiserschmarrn; 08-20-20 at 07:28 PM.
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Old 08-20-20, 12:24 AM
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^^^^^ Sweet enough deal, esp now. The 105, etc. components are a notch or two above those of the Nishiki. Looks about 2cm taller than the Nishiki How does it fit? It really depends as much on your "proportions" as absolute height. I'm only 5'8", but with a 33" inseam, short torso and short arms. So I fit a 58cm seat-tube frame quite nicely, as long as top tube isn't too long. So at your height, a 58 might be fine.

The brake levers appear to be a little too high on the bar. If you rotate the bar in the stem clamp so the drops point downward just a bit, then unwrap the tape and move the levers down accordingly, with that shape of bar, I think you'll have a more ergonomic transition between the bar and the hoods.

Last edited by madpogue; 08-20-20 at 12:28 AM.
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Old 08-20-20, 07:51 PM
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Originally Posted by madpogue View Post
^^^^^ Sweet enough deal, esp now. The 105, etc. components are a notch or two above those of the Nishiki. Looks about 2cm taller than the Nishiki How does it fit? It really depends as much on your "proportions" as absolute height. I'm only 5'8", but with a 33" inseam, short torso and short arms. So I fit a 58cm seat-tube frame quite nicely, as long as top tube isn't too long. So at your height, a 58 might be fine.

The brake levers appear to be a little too high on the bar. If you rotate the bar in the stem clamp so the drops point downward just a bit, then unwrap the tape and move the levers down accordingly, with that shape of bar, I think you'll have a more ergonomic transition between the bar and the hoods.
Good call on the Nishiki vs. the Specialized size. I did not see the difference till I looked at the two in images The Nishiki seller said that it is a "55cm' model. My main bike, a Trek Emonda, that is a 56cm. For years, when I was a lot younger and didn't know better, I was riding a gifted to me Peugeot PRN10 from the mid to late 70s. Since the guy was my size, I just figured it should be correct. I rode it for years, clueless. I am not really sure if the Specialized fits me correctly or not. I know that the way I have it setup right now is more aggressive than my Emonda. I stepped over and sat on a 54 cm bike once, but it felt like a child's bike. I do.not remember if we adjusted the seat perfectly for me.

I may post some pics of how the bike is setup for me. Someone should be able to notice if the bike fits me by the seat and handlebar position (I THINK).

You have some good ideas about the handlebar/brake position. I do have some issues with the brake lever hood position, so I will try your suggestions.

Danny

Last edited by kaiserschmarrn; 08-29-20 at 04:47 PM.
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