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Quill stem

Old 08-08-20, 08:36 PM
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Bpor3248
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Quill stem

I just refurbished a 1982 Fuji America and took it for its first ride today. Great ride but I知 thinking the handlebars might be too low. I put many miles on this bike when I was younger and I had an aggressive set up. I知 now 67 and looking for a more relaxed ride. Any thoughts on how high I should set the handlebars to get a more comfortable ride.
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Old 08-08-20, 08:44 PM
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ofajen
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Originally Posted by Bpor3248 View Post
I just refurbished a 1982 Fuji America and took it for its first ride today. Great ride but I知 thinking the handlebars might be too low. I put many miles on this bike when I was younger and I had an aggressive set up. I知 now 67 and looking for a more relaxed ride. Any thoughts on how high I should set the handlebars to get a more comfortable ride.
I find having the bar tops about level with the saddle gives a very versatile setup with a classic round bend bar.

Otto
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Old 08-08-20, 08:54 PM
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While the ideal as said for this bike is a classic level top line. Given the OP's post I would say try lowering the saddle 1 inch or so and raise the stem about a inch to just below the max rise line.
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Old 08-08-20, 09:01 PM
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Where does it hurt?
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Old 08-08-20, 11:55 PM
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The great thing about quill stems is we can adjust the height easily. Sometimes I'll stop during a ride and make an adjustment.

For awhile when I was recovering from neck and shoulder injuries I raised the quill stems quite a bit. And tipped the drop bar slightly back toward me. I prefer the drops slightly angled, not parallel with the ground. And I'd loosen the brake lever clamps and raise the hoods. Then I'd adjust the finger reach to the levers with the little hidden grub screw, so the brakes still fell naturally under my fingers.

Back around 2017 I had to switch from my road bike's original 120mm stem to a 90mm, which I rode for almost two years. But a few months ago I was making enough progress with physical therapy to switch to a 100 or 110mm stem. Feels more stable on fast curves, especially on rippled pavement. The short 90mm stem was comfy but twitchy. But I also had to raise the quill stem about 1/4" and might raise it a bit more.

Try lots of little tweaks. Carry a multi tool and you can make most adjustments during rest breaks in a ride. That's how I tweak all my bike setups.

I wouldn't use the saddle height to influence upper body bike fit. The saddle adjustments should be appropriate for the knees and hips, not the upper body. Same with the fore/aft positioning of a saddle. That's primarily to suit our knees, hips and lower back, and optimal power transfer while being comfortable.

The only saddle adjustment I make to suit my handlebar/stem is the saddle angle. Usually I prefer the saddle flat but sometimes an up or down angle, one or two notches, might be suitable for some handlebar setups. I just go by how my butt and perineum feel during a longer ride. Saddle, padded shorts, etc., can influence these too.
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Old 08-09-20, 04:28 AM
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Try one of these:

Nitto Technomic quill stems at Ben's Cycle
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Old 08-09-20, 05:55 AM
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Shoulders
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Old 08-09-20, 06:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Bpor3248 View Post
Shoulders
I think you're caught in between. If you've still got stomach muscles and a decent back, a lower stem position might do the trick as well. The stomach and legs take the weight and your upper body can relax, moving your hands to different bar positions.
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Old 08-09-20, 06:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Bpor3248 View Post
Shoulders
canklecat hit most of the points.

The position of the brake hoods and length of the stem may also be factors.

Sometimes, the solution to a fit issue can be counter-intuitive. Try raising and lowering the stem, rotate the bars, try a longer and shorter stem.
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Old 08-09-20, 10:16 AM
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I have trouble with my neck- looking up to see the road in front of me. I got a 'dirt drop' riser stem for my bike. Love it. I got Nitto Technomics for the other 2 main riders in my fleet (hoard). Love 'em.

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Old 08-09-20, 02:08 PM
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+1 for the Dirt Drop-type stem on The Golden Boy's Trek above, if you want extra height. Looks way better than a long-necked Technomic IMO. Of course, you're limited to 80 (or 100 maybe) reach, and 26.0 bar barrel diameter.
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Old 08-09-20, 02:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Bpor3248 View Post
Shoulders
Really need to see you on the bike. So, So many riders sit with locked elbows. Not saying this is the case, but locked elbows will place all the shock to be absorbed at the shoulders.
A slight bend in the elbows is actually a learned thing, I was locked elbows when I started.

being interested and having the set up where you move hands around the bars helps too.

I set my son up with inline cyclocross style levers on the tops just to have him move his hands around and still feel the safety of having immediate braking.
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