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Still amazes me using Barkeepers Friend for rust removal

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Still amazes me using Barkeepers Friend for rust removal

Old 08-09-20, 11:08 AM
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Still amazes me using Barkeepers Friend for rust removal

I let this soak over night in a container of water and a little Barkeeper Friend that has oxalic acid in it.Quick wipe down and it looks pretty good.


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Old 08-09-20, 01:07 PM
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What’s in that magic potion?
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Old 08-09-20, 01:16 PM
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"According to the 2015 material safety data sheet, the ingredients are feldspar, linear sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (DDBSA) and oxalic acid". Don't know the proportions.
Feldspar is a fine, mild abrasive (Mohs hardness 6), NaDDBSA is a surfactant, and my guess is that the oxalic acid (wood bleach) is what's most active in removing rust when used as a "dip-and-wait" treatment. Don't get it on your skin or in your eyes, and don't drink it.
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Old 08-09-20, 01:21 PM
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Thanks, will look for something comparable here in Europe.
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Old 08-09-20, 01:36 PM
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Yep it's the oxalic acid powderthat does all the rust removal, and around here you can find Barkeepers Friend both easier and for much lower cost that the pure "Wood bleach" crystals. According to legend the discovery was made by the originator when he was cleaning some rusty kitchen wear with rhubarb leftover in the dishwater, and after they soaked in the sink for a spell he found that rust had dramatically vanished. (Rhubarb having a significant amount of naturally-occurring oxalic acid)....and the rest is history, so they say.
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Old 08-09-20, 03:52 PM
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That’s the plan for a light rubdown on these bells!


Skipping the beer this time.
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Old 08-09-20, 04:21 PM
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I think Brasso is a similar product. I recall is being available in UK and Canada.
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Old 08-09-20, 04:37 PM
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I have a stainless steel bike. Bar keeper’s friend (liquid version) is what I use to shine it up!
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Old 08-09-20, 04:39 PM
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I, too, use Brasso. Reeks heavily of ammonia but works very well.
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Old 08-09-20, 07:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Dirt Farmer View Post
I, too, use Brasso. Reeks heavily of ammonia but works very well.
Too much time polishing brass in basic. I wouldn't use it on a dare!
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Old 08-09-20, 07:18 PM
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You know what else works? Ketchup. Sounds weird but it's true. I've removed much rust, tarnish, and corrosion from metal objects, from a wok to the tag of a vintage vacuum cleaner to silver jewelry, with it. Glop it on, let it sit a bit, wash it off. (And it's probably already in your house; is safe for children, pets, Mother Nature, and your septic system; and doesn't smell bad. )
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Old 08-09-20, 08:09 PM
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Sometimes I think that the only reason my parents had kids was to have little slaves for rubbing and scraping off old paint and restoring old beat up stuff. It's probably all due to the fact that the house they chose to raise us in was built in 1917. And, it was a big pile of rotting flaking stuff. With a coal fired boiler for heat. OMG. Then, when we started riding bikes it was all old Schwinn, Raleigh, Columbia and, Executive stuff. Me and my brother discovered mail order bikes from Europe around 1972. And that made all the difference.
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Old 08-10-20, 06:24 AM
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When I was a kid, my mom used Bar Keeper's Friend to remove rust stains in the sink. I still keep some in the house.
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Old 08-10-20, 07:30 AM
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Barkeeper's friend also works great on car windshields. Hose it down, sprinkle BF on, make a paste with a sponge and sponge clean the windshield. Rinse well, and voila. Like new glass.
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Old 08-10-20, 07:32 AM
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Believe it or not, I just found it on Amazon, as easy as that.
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Old 08-10-20, 07:57 AM
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Barkeeper's friend also works great on plastic car headlights as well.
I've also used Cameo Stainless and aluminum cleanser for both metal and plastic polishing as well.
Cameo is a bit softer on the finish as far as leaving any fine scratches behind.

Vinegar also works well for removing rust.

For most chrome though I go right for the wire wheel cleaner acid, its fast and leaves nothing behind to clean up. Just spray on, and rinse. Just don't get it on skin, paint or aluminum.
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Old 08-10-20, 08:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Gonzobuster View Post
Believe it or not, I just found it on Amazon, as easy as that.
No surprise, it's one of those products that you find at both the supermarket (in the aisle with the Comet cleanser etc) and a well-stocked hardware store. Seems like it's been around forever.
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Old 08-10-20, 11:10 AM
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I used it when derusting the handlebar on the 1898 Glenwood. A 122 year old Nickel finish is just amazing...in a patina sort of way. For small objects it works great!
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Old 08-10-20, 11:34 AM
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Originally Posted by madpogue View Post
No surprise, it's one of those products that you find at both the supermarket (in the aisle with the Comet cleanser etc) and a well-stocked hardware store. Seems like it's been around forever.
Friendly neighborhood hardware store.
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Old 08-10-20, 12:03 PM
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And guess where it is used a lot? In BARS! All that stainless is kept shiny with it. I use it myself to clean my beer making kettle, to get the buildup off the bottom.
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Old 08-10-20, 01:32 PM
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ZUD is less abrasive, and does the same thing.
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Old 08-10-20, 01:34 PM
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Originally Posted by jiangshi View Post
ZUD is less abrasive, and does the same thing.
Jump ball as to which is the cooler name; suppose it depends on whether brevity is your kinda thing.....
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Old 08-10-20, 01:46 PM
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Please handle oxalic acid carefully. It doesn't sting but it has long-term health risks. I handled it badly years ago, and I kick myself for it. Our bodies never flush it, and it accumulates with each exposure.
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Old 08-10-20, 02:15 PM
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Originally Posted by madpogue View Post
No surprise, it's one of those products that you find at both the supermarket (in the aisle with the Comet cleanser etc) and a well-stocked hardware store. Seems like it's been around forever.
Never saw it in a European supermarket before, though.
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Old 08-10-20, 02:16 PM
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
Please handle oxalic acid carefully. It doesn't sting but it has long-term health risks. I handled it badly years ago, and I kick myself for it. Our bodies never flush it, and it accumulates with each exposure.
What happened if I may ask?
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