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Science behind the steele frame

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Science behind the steele frame

Old 09-02-20, 11:31 AM
  #51  
DownByLaw
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I prefer steel from a durability standpoint and ride quality (meaning feel, not necessarily cushiness). Not interested in carbon and it's fragile nature/crack susceptibility.
Went to my LBS a few weeks ago to poke about for a new ride. I had been looking at steel touring bikes for a slower pace and more enjoyment and versatility
compared to my Cannondale CAAD9. Great bike, but I think it's always been a bit small and between that and the aggressive geometry and limited gearing (I ride hills),
it has started to bother me and I don't enjoy it as much anymore (getting old sucks).

I relayed this info to the owner of the LBS who accused me of being old school and he proceeded to try to sell me carbon road bikes in the 3-6k range. He said not
to worry about the carbon fragility, as they had a guy that could repair it if/when it cracked. Not exactly confidence inspiring going into a new bike and the wrong thing to
try to sell to a casual rider such as myself. I had gone to this store as they are a Jamis dealer and I was interested in a Renegade.

I'm really enjoying my new Masi Giramondo 27.5 that I ordered right after. Fits the bill and I love the fact I can ride the road edge without puckering and explore some
dirt/gravel when I feel like. It rides great and feels alive (although I'm sure the fat tires help the ride). It's fun.

Anyhoo, I'm in the middle of restoring/upgrading my Nishiki Custom Sport (Kawamura frame) from high school, which happens to be steel and is one of the most comfortable bikes I've ever ridden. On the other
hand the donor bike for some of the parts, a steel Schwinn Prelude from the late 80's, is one of the harshest frames I've ever ridden.

Patrick
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Old 09-02-20, 01:13 PM
  #52  
mstateglfr 
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Originally Posted by steve sumner View Post
BITD I think it was Tom Ritchey who said: a really good road bike is supposed to react like a spring
you don't make springs out of aluminum" that springy, resiliant, alive feel only comes from steel or titane
bikes alu-alloy and carbon fibre will feel dead. but the rider who only wants lightness combined with
stiffness will sadly never have the time or inclination to feel it
Perhaps a bit ironic that Ritchey has carbon forks and frame then.
Or the company just recognizes that there is a market for it and then decides to design what they view is an inferior product?...that'd be odd.
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Old 09-02-20, 01:17 PM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by gthomson View Post
Can anyone back me up or am I just sentimental to the bikes I rode when I was younger?
Part could be true and part could be sentimental.

I personally think tires(width and quality) and geometry play a larger role in comfort and feel than frame material.
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Old 10-08-20, 05:17 PM
  #54  
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Just some additional studies related to this thread.

This doesn't get into the difference between materials, but does talk through deflections and an FEA analysis of a bike frame.
https://www.brighton.ac.uk/_pdf/rese...geometries.pdf

This article talks through the different deflections and strain energy when using different materials. I believe it assumes that the geometry remains the same in all cases, which is not likely the case when optimizing a design for a different material.
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf...87814017739513
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