Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

should I scavenge/hoard or not

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

should I scavenge/hoard or not

Old 08-31-20, 06:01 AM
  #1  
trail_monkey
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
trail_monkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Iowa
Posts: 1,028

Bikes: Soma B Side, Soma Wolverine, Salsa Fargo

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 322 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 10 Posts
should I scavenge/hoard or not

I posted a couple times yesterday regarding some old beaters I scavenged to make one bike out of for my wife. So 4 miles away from me lived a gentleman and his wife who had a program where people donated used toys and bikes. Everything was free. People were encouraged to come over and get a bike for their kids or themselves. Often times people would take parts off one bike to fix another. He'd been doing this for years! To say he has quite an accumulation is an understatement. Everything is outdoors exposed to the elements. He has a couple acres of old bikes laying around. This is where I found my 85 Panasonic DX 3000 a few years ago that I restored. I found a Trek road bike and fixed it up for a friend. We found some 60s Schwinns that were beat up badly and made good garden art. This place has been picked pretty clean of the good stuff. Most of what's left are old dept store bikes from the 70s, 80s, and 90s. I got to admit it's cool seeing an old seized up Mossberg 10 speed. Never knew they used to make bikes. Anyways the fella recently passed and his widow is cleaning house. The program is finally at an end. I find myself wanting to dig deeper in case there are any pieces worth anything before it's too late. I know there are a couple old bikes with solid ashtabula cranks that have internal geared rear hubs. But I don't know if the bikes were cheap bikes in the day or decent. Is any internal geared hub worth grabbing or are there cheaper ones that are better left to the trash pile?
trail_monkey is offline  
Old 08-31-20, 06:24 AM
  #2  
Charles Wahl
Disraeli Gears
 
Charles Wahl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: NYC
Posts: 3,919
Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 366 Post(s)
Liked 176 Times in 116 Posts
My counsel: avoid getting into hoarding if you can help it; it is a sickness, even if relatively benign compared to others. If you live with others, it's an imposition on their lives too -- speaking from experience here, and I am guilty of it.
But, whatever floats your boat.
Charles Wahl is offline  
Likes For Charles Wahl:
Old 08-31-20, 07:04 AM
  #3  
rhm
multimodal commuter
 
rhm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: NJ, NYC, LI
Posts: 19,640

Bikes: 1940s Fothergill, 1959 Allegro Special, 1963? Claud Butler Olympic Sprint, Lambert 'Clubman', 1974 Fuji "the Ace", 1976 Holdsworth 650b conversion rando bike, 1983 Trek 720 tourer, 1984 Counterpoint Opus II, 1993 Basso Gap, 2010 Downtube 8h, and...

Mentioned: 527 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1798 Post(s)
Liked 306 Times in 202 Posts
Originally Posted by trail_monkey View Post
Is any internal geared hub worth grabbing or are there cheaper ones that are better left to the trash pile?
Sturmey Archer hubs have their fans. The usual model (AW) is durable and reliable and people often need spare parts for them; so, in general, worth picking up. A lot of the less common models are more desirable. Any Sturmey Archer hub with an aluminum shell is worth picking up. So... yeah, grab the Sturmey Archer hubs and related parts if possible.

The same probably goes for Fichtel & Sachs hubs, but you won't see so many of those. You'll probably see a lot of Shimano ones... it's hard to work up much enthusiasm about those, though.
__________________
www.rhmsaddles.com.
rhm is offline  
Old 08-31-20, 07:36 AM
  #4  
trail_monkey
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
trail_monkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Iowa
Posts: 1,028

Bikes: Soma B Side, Soma Wolverine, Salsa Fargo

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 322 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by Charles Wahl View Post
My counsel: avoid getting into hoarding if you can help it; it is a sickness, even if relatively benign compared to others. If you live with others, it's an imposition on their lives too -- speaking from experience here, and I am guilty of it.
But, whatever floats your boat.
Well I shouldn't have worded things that way. I'm actually not a hoarder. I throw more stuff away than I save and usually regret it later. My dad was a hoarder and I refuse to be that way. But it was a term I was just using in a general sense for my topic. basically I was wondering if any of these internally geared hubs were worth getting on their 26-in wheels in case I ever wanted to throw something together in the future. I didn't want to go collect some hubs that were known garbage and not equivalent to one of the better quality ones. I know I seen one over there the other day and the cable was frozen but I assume if I cut the cable the hub itself would still work internally. I have no idea what brand it was.
trail_monkey is offline  
Old 08-31-20, 07:47 AM
  #5  
rustystrings61 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Greenwood SC USA
Posts: 1,491

Bikes: 2002 Mercian Vincitore, 1982 Mercian Colorado, 1976 Puch Royal X, 1974 Allegro No. 76, 1973 Raleigh Competition, 1973 Raleigh GS, 1971 Gitane Tour de France and others

Mentioned: 44 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 504 Post(s)
Liked 495 Times in 285 Posts
Originally Posted by rhm View Post
Sturmey Archer hubs have their fans. The usual model (AW) is durable and reliable and people often need spare parts for them; so, in general, worth picking up. A lot of the less common models are more desirable. Any Sturmey Archer hub with an aluminum shell is worth picking up. So... yeah, grab the Sturmey Archer hubs and related parts if possible.

The same probably goes for Fichtel & Sachs hubs, but you won't see so many of those. You'll probably see a lot of Shimano ones... it's hard to work up much enthusiasm about those, though.
In addition to @rhm's sage advice above, maybe keep an eye peeled for SunTour derailleurs, in particular the V and Vx models. Lots of those were used as replacements because they were relatively inexpensive, and they're still very fine units and worth rescuing before they become scrap metal. The same goes for their ratcheting shifters. You might see an old Shimano 600 or two, as well - those were once relatively inexpensive and were also used as replacements for Delrin Simplex Prestige units that failed.

Good hunting!
rustystrings61 is offline  
Old 08-31-20, 07:52 AM
  #6  
trail_monkey
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
trail_monkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Iowa
Posts: 1,028

Bikes: Soma B Side, Soma Wolverine, Salsa Fargo

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 322 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by rustystrings61 View Post
In addition to @rhm's sage advice above, maybe keep an eye peeled for SunTour derailleurs, in particular the V and Vx models. Lots of those were used as replacements because they were relatively inexpensive, and they're still very fine units and worth rescuing before they become scrap metal. The same goes for their ratcheting shifters. You might see an old Shimano 600 or two, as well - those were once relatively inexpensive and were also used as replacements for Delrin Simplex Prestige units that failed.

Good hunting!
There was tons of sun tour derailleurs there at one time. I'll have to look. But all of the sun tour and Shimano derailleurs I have found were built into the cheap derailleur hanger that had the little 9 mm hex nut that held it into the horizontal drop out. I get confused as to what was quality back then compared to today? I know that certain derailleur configurations and even the cheap Ashtabula cranks are usually an indication of a cheap department store bike. But yet you see some of these really old Schwinns running ashtobola cranks so I don't know where to differentiate. I've also seen several old Raleigh bikes in this pile a few years ago that had sun tour derailleurs that were built on the cheap derailleur hanger. To my untrained eye I assumed that was a cheaper bike since it didn't have the hex nut to unscrew the derailleur from the hanger. Those raleighs have been taken by someone else unfortunately so they are not there anymore.
trail_monkey is offline  
Old 08-31-20, 08:01 AM
  #7  
rustystrings61 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Greenwood SC USA
Posts: 1,491

Bikes: 2002 Mercian Vincitore, 1982 Mercian Colorado, 1976 Puch Royal X, 1974 Allegro No. 76, 1973 Raleigh Competition, 1973 Raleigh GS, 1971 Gitane Tour de France and others

Mentioned: 44 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 504 Post(s)
Liked 495 Times in 285 Posts
Okay, so you will need to take a wrench to loosen the claw adapter from the dropout. Even high-quality derailleurs were often fitted to the adapter claws, because there were many, many fine bikes built that did NOT have an integral derailleur eye as part of a forged dropout - those came later. Even Campagnolo derailleurs were often fitted to adapter claws, because plain horizontal dropouts allowed the use of different derailleurs in the years before everyone standardized on the Campagnolo pattern we all use today. Simplex had integral forged dropouts with their own unthreaded, bolts through from the inside setup, and Huret had a threaded one that requires the use of an adapter because the shoulder (?) is at 4 o'clock instead of 7 o'clock - and then there were other systems before then that are now long gone.

Anyway, the SunTour V-GT Luxe and its cousins are ALL good rear derailleurs, whether used with adapter claws or not.
rustystrings61 is offline  
Old 08-31-20, 08:02 AM
  #8  
BFisher 
Senior Member
 
BFisher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,653
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 494 Post(s)
Liked 1,004 Times in 514 Posts
Definitely don't hoard, but it is nice to have a good selection of spares on hand. Figure out what you like/want and grab an extra few.
BFisher is offline  
Old 08-31-20, 08:24 AM
  #9  
trail_monkey
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
trail_monkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Iowa
Posts: 1,028

Bikes: Soma B Side, Soma Wolverine, Salsa Fargo

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 322 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by rustystrings61 View Post
Okay, so you will need to take a wrench to loosen the claw adapter from the dropout. Even high-quality derailleurs were often fitted to the adapter claws, because there were many, many fine bikes built that did NOT have an integral derailleur eye as part of a forged dropout - those came later. Even Campagnolo derailleurs were often fitted to adapter claws, because plain horizontal dropouts allowed the use of different derailleurs in the years before everyone standardized on the Campagnolo pattern we all use today. Simplex had integral forged dropouts with their own unthreaded, bolts through from the inside setup, and Huret had a threaded one that requires the use of an adapter because the shoulder (?) is at 4 o'clock instead of 7 o'clock - and then there were other systems before then that are now long gone.

Anyway, the SunTour V-GT Luxe and its cousins are ALL good rear derailleurs, whether used with adapter claws or not.
Wow thank you for that information! I just knew in modern times that any good quality bike had a derailleur without a claw adapter. I wasn't aware that back in the day the high quality stuff used the claw adapter. Thank you so much for clarifying all this for me. there's probably just as many old Shimano derailers as there is sun tour on these bikes.
trail_monkey is offline  
Old 08-31-20, 03:45 PM
  #10  
Dave Mayer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 2,032
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 773 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 125 Times in 84 Posts
I volunteer at a high-volume, big-city bike Co-op. Want to cure yourself of hording? Then volunteer at a similar Co-op. Yesterday we had several bikes come in as donations, including a fully-functional $2,000 E-bike that was basically abandoned by a lady who could no longer ride. She could have sold it, but liked the shop and its volunteers. Plus we had many bags of tires, wheels and parts to sort through prior to sale. Yes, there were many decent Suntour derailleurs in the pile, plus Campy stuff.

I used to have a big stash of old bike stuff including Superbe Pro, Record, Dura-Ace etc. I purged and donated most of that to the shop a few years ago. I no longer want to hang onto anything that I am not riding. Good riddance.
Dave Mayer is offline  
Old 08-31-20, 03:50 PM
  #11  
trail_monkey
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
trail_monkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Iowa
Posts: 1,028

Bikes: Soma B Side, Soma Wolverine, Salsa Fargo

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 322 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by Dave Mayer View Post
I volunteer at a high-volume, big-city bike Co-op. Want to cure yourself of hording? Then volunteer at a similar Co-op. Yesterday we had several bikes come in as donations, including a fully-functional $2,000 E-bike that was basically abandoned by a lady who could no longer ride. She could have sold it, but liked the shop and its volunteers. Plus we had many bags of tires, wheels and parts to sort through prior to sale. Yes, there were many decent Suntour derailleurs in the pile, plus Campy stuff.

I used to have a big stash of old bike stuff including Superbe Pro, Record, Dura-Ace etc. I purged and donated most of that to the shop a few years ago. I no longer want to hang onto anything that I am not riding. Good riddance.
I've actually done the same thing. A year ago I purged a bunch of stuff and threw away about six aluminum chain rings from old sakae crank sets. Now I wished I had one of them for this project I'm working on. You can't win for losing
trail_monkey is offline  
Old 08-31-20, 04:01 PM
  #12  
shelbyfv 
Senior Member
 
shelbyfv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: TN
Posts: 8,359
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2255 Post(s)
Liked 2,179 Times in 1,181 Posts
I wouldn't bother with it. Low end old stuff is still low end, old doesn't make it any nicer or more interesting.
shelbyfv is online now  
Old 08-31-20, 04:02 PM
  #13  
Hudson308 
Mr. Anachronism
 
Hudson308's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Somewhere west of Tobie's
Posts: 2,041

Bikes: fillet-brazed Chicago Schwinns, and some other stuff

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 509 Post(s)
Liked 204 Times in 140 Posts
Sounds like some people in the know have already picked this pile over long ago. I agree it would be worth it to go through once more and pull out the remaining Suntour derailleurs, S-A hubs, high flange hubs, thumb shifters and forged aluminum cranks. Suntour didn't make much junk. They made some heavy derailleurs sure, but even those shifted very well.
__________________
"If we don't change direction soon, we'll end up where we're going." -Irwin Corey

Last edited by Hudson308; 08-31-20 at 09:42 PM.
Hudson308 is offline  
Old 08-31-20, 04:31 PM
  #14  
scarlson 
Senior Member
 
scarlson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Medford MA
Posts: 1,320

Bikes: Ron Cooper touring, 1959 Jack Taylor 650b ladyback touring tandem, Vitus 979, Joe Bell painted Claud Butler Dalesman, Colin Laing curved tube tandem, heavily-Dilberted 1982 Trek 6xx, René Herse tandem

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 568 Post(s)
Liked 686 Times in 397 Posts
Nothing wrong with a little light junk collection, don't let people stigmatize! KonMari your life and you'll find you soon need some of that junk that didn't "spark joy" for you in some moment of death-cleaning-rampage. Then the commercial industrial complex dictates you must either rent or buy from robber baron Jeff Bezos. Better yet, pay him for some premium digital content and don't bother at all with earthly things. Feel zen yet? Or just discouraged? It turns out you can learn a lot from owning an object.

Junk ownership is a spectrum, and yes there's some sickness to be found at both extremes. There's satisfaction to be found in clutter. It's just not currently in vogue. Free yourself a little bit from wage slavery and the capitalist machine through junkpile ownership! And treat the so-called hoarder kindly. Lots of people getting labeled hoarders who shouldn't be (including me). It isn't a problem if it doesn't hurt anyone else.
__________________
Owner & co-founder, Cycles René Hubris. Unfortunately attaching questionable braze-ons to perfectly good frames since about 2015. With style.
scarlson is offline  
Old 08-31-20, 05:36 PM
  #15  
Cougrrcj 
Over forty victim of Fate
 
Cougrrcj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 3,732

Bikes: A few...

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 557 Post(s)
Liked 284 Times in 193 Posts
Originally Posted by rhm View Post
You'll probably see a lot of Shimano ones... it's hard to work up much enthusiasm about those, though.
I never had any problems with my early '70s Sears Free Spirit w/Shimano 3-speed. In fact, I preferred it to the S-A, because setting the shift cable was easier! The S-A had an annoying trait of having a null space between 2-3 that caused be to just about neuter myself on several occasions.

Those Shimano 3-speeds made great winter-beaters!!!
__________________
'75 Fuji S-10S bought new, 52k+ miles and still going!
'84 Univega Gran Tourismo
'84 Univega Viva Sport
'86 Miyata 710
'90 Schwinn Woodlands
Unknown brand MTB of questionable lineage aka 'Mutt Trail Bike'
Plus or minus a few others from time-to-time

Cougrrcj is offline  
Old 08-31-20, 08:30 PM
  #16  
Nemosengineer 
Hair Ball
 
Nemosengineer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Murrieta Ca.
Posts: 430

Bikes: Teledyne Titan, Bob Jackson World Tour, AlAn Record Ergal, 3Rensho Katana.

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 175 Post(s)
Liked 333 Times in 160 Posts
It's not hoarding if you just collect the good stuff.
__________________
Booyah Hubba-Hubba!!!
Nemosengineer is offline  
Old 09-01-20, 03:39 AM
  #17  
Miele Man
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 4,290

Bikes: iele Latina, Miele Suprema, Miele Uno LS, Miele Miele Beta, MMTB, Bianchi Model Unknown, Fiori Venezia, Fiori Napoli, VeloSport Adamas AX

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1166 Post(s)
Liked 732 Times in 509 Posts
Hoarding? Or preparing for the future when some of those parts might be really scarce and in high demand?

Back around 2014 I came across a small bicycle shop just outside of another city near me. They were selling a lot of NOS stuff really cheap because there wasn't much demand for it. I was able to stock up on (hoard?) a number of NOS Uniglide cassettes and some other rare items such as Dura Ace AX brake pads.

Sometimes hoarding can be a good thing. I think I now have enough Uniglide cassettes and Dura Ace AX brake pads to last me the rest of my days.

Cheers
Miele Man is offline  
Old 09-01-20, 03:41 AM
  #18  
Miele Man
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 4,290

Bikes: iele Latina, Miele Suprema, Miele Uno LS, Miele Miele Beta, MMTB, Bianchi Model Unknown, Fiori Venezia, Fiori Napoli, VeloSport Adamas AX

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1166 Post(s)
Liked 732 Times in 509 Posts
Originally Posted by Cougrrcj View Post
I never had any problems with my early '70s Sears Free Spirit w/Shimano 3-speed. In fact, I preferred it to the S-A, because setting the shift cable was easier! The S-A had an annoying trait of having a null space between 2-3 that caused be to just about neuter myself on several occasions.

Those Shimano 3-speeds made great winter-beaters!!!
I had a CCM Golden Sabre with 3-speed Shimano hub and a twist-grip shifter. I loved that bike. Unfortunately it got stolen during a 30 seconds stop I made and didn't lock the bike.

Cheers
Miele Man is offline  
Old 09-01-20, 06:15 AM
  #19  
RobbieTunes
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 27,297
Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 378 Post(s)
Liked 1,372 Times in 886 Posts
If it involves bikes, it's not hoarding.
It's saving, preparation, predicting, preserving, collecting, discerning, triaging, fitness accumulation, spin casting, and landfill selecting.
If there's one thing this forum can do, it's irrational rationalization.
RobbieTunes is offline  
Old 09-01-20, 06:44 AM
  #20  
J.Higgins 
Mentally Derailleured
 
J.Higgins's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 2,325

Bikes: Bilenky Tourlite, Surly Ogre

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1180 Post(s)
Liked 462 Times in 315 Posts
A couple years ago, I fell in with someone who had well over 1000 bikes. All were of "decent" quality - no wallymart junk - but he still triaged his stash. He would sell off anything he didnt want, which were primarily British three-speeds and average-quality road bikes. He was into bulk-deals, and he would sell me as many bikes as I could jam into the back of my pickup for $100. If I packed them right, and used enough straps, I could get 8-10 bikes in there. I looks like a giant porcupine rolling down the road!

Soon, my affiliation with him grew my personal stash up to 60 bikes, then 100 or more. I stopped counting after a while. That massive blob of bikes in my backyard, covered with blue tarps, made me feel kind of gross inside. I realized that it was time to take action or just set back and let it become a burgeoning hoarder's leviathan. So I started dismantling.

One at a time, I brought a bike in, stripped it completely and saved anything that was worth saving. It actually took three weeks of careful and deliberate work to eliminate that awful glut of bikes on my lawn.

I think its safe to say that I have a nice repository of spare parts, everything in labeled clear-plastic totes.

Moral of the story: Get all the bikes and parts you need or want, but just don't let them sit and become home for vermin.
J.Higgins is offline  
Old 09-01-20, 06:55 AM
  #21  
trail_monkey
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
trail_monkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Iowa
Posts: 1,028

Bikes: Soma B Side, Soma Wolverine, Salsa Fargo

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 322 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by J.Higgins View Post
A couple years ago, I fell in with someone who had well over 1000 bikes. All were of "decent" quality - no wallymart junk - but he still triaged his stash. He would sell off anything he didnt want, which were primarily British three-speeds and average-quality road bikes. He was into bulk-deals, and he would sell me as many bikes as I could jam into the back of my pickup for $100. If I packed them right, and used enough straps, I could get 8-10 bikes in there. I looks like a giant porcupine rolling down the road!

Soon, my affiliation with him grew my personal stash up to 60 bikes, then 100 or more. I stopped counting after a while. That massive blob of bikes in my backyard, covered with blue tarps, made me feel kind of gross inside. I realized that it was time to take action or just set back and let it become a burgeoning hoarder's leviathan. So I started dismantling.

One at a time, I brought a bike in, stripped it completely and saved anything that was worth saving. It actually took three weeks of careful and deliberate work to eliminate that awful glut of bikes on my lawn.

I think its safe to say that I have a nice repository of spare parts, everything in labeled clear-plastic totes.

Moral of the story: Get all the bikes and parts you need or want, but just don't let them sit and become home for vermin.
The problem with this place over here is some of these bikes have been sitting out in the elements for years. Add to the fact that they're 1960s '70s and early '80s vintage and what you do find that might be worth salvaging a lot of times isn't worth salvaging if that makes sense. I found probably six or seven bikes or loose wheels yesterday with Shimano three-speed hubs and every one of the shifters, on a complete bike, had the plastic piece busted that the cable housing sat into. That must have been a common place to fail because they were all broke. I found three sturmey and Archer three-speed hubs and every one of them was completely seized up. I did bring one home and cut it out of the rim and tried to disassemble it in my bench vise. I got it down and it was full of rust and the bearings were corroded and it was still seized up in the planetaries. I'm pretty sure there was nothing worse salvaging in this thing. So yeah the parts are over there but most are too far gone. The majority of the Shimano three-speed rear hubs that I found actually worked. They were all the 3s hubs. I brought one home and tore it apart and it was still full of grease and in excellent shape internally. But I'm getting to the point I just can't see purchasing spokes and lacing up an old used rim with an old used hub. I just don't think it's worth the money so I don't think I'm going to mess around with it. Anything I can clean polish regrease and reuse I will do so. But if I have to spend money to put anything together I don't think I'm game.
trail_monkey is offline  
Old 09-01-20, 07:09 AM
  #22  
rhm
multimodal commuter
 
rhm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: NJ, NYC, LI
Posts: 19,640

Bikes: 1940s Fothergill, 1959 Allegro Special, 1963? Claud Butler Olympic Sprint, Lambert 'Clubman', 1974 Fuji "the Ace", 1976 Holdsworth 650b conversion rando bike, 1983 Trek 720 tourer, 1984 Counterpoint Opus II, 1993 Basso Gap, 2010 Downtube 8h, and...

Mentioned: 527 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1798 Post(s)
Liked 306 Times in 202 Posts
Originally Posted by Cougrrcj View Post
I never had any problems with my early '70s Sears Free Spirit w/Shimano 3-speed. In fact, I preferred it to the S-A, because setting the shift cable was easier! The S-A had an annoying trait of having a null space between 2-3 that caused be to just about neuter myself on several occasions.

Those Shimano 3-speeds made great winter-beaters!!!
Ironically that has been my experience with Shimano hubs as well. Easy to adjust, and smooth shifting, no problems. But if they don't work perfectly, they go in the junk pile. I wouldn't know how to fix one, and wouldn't know where to get spare parts if I did.
__________________
www.rhmsaddles.com.
rhm is offline  
Old 09-01-20, 09:07 AM
  #23  
Kobe 
Senior Member
 
Kobe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Schwenksville, Pa
Posts: 2,711
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 213 Post(s)
Liked 117 Times in 88 Posts
Originally Posted by trail_monkey View Post
I got to admit it's cool seeing an old seized up Mossberg 10 speed. Never knew they used to make bikes.
I have seen a couple of Browning's too. They were low end bikes.

Originally Posted by RobbieTunes View Post
If it involves bikes, it's not hoarding.
It's saving, preparation, predicting, preserving, collecting, discerning, triaging, fitness accumulation, spin casting, and landfill selecting.
If there's one thing this forum can do, it's irrational rationalization.
You sound like a Doomsday Prepper.
__________________
'85 Specialized Expedition, '88 Proteus, '07 Rivendell AHH, '13 Black Mountain Cycles Cross, '16 Clockwork All-Rounder, '19 Gunnar Sport






Kobe is offline  
Likes For Kobe:
Old 09-01-20, 09:54 AM
  #24  
curbtender
Senior Member
 
curbtender's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SF Bay Area, East bay
Posts: 6,800

Bikes: Marinoni, Kestral 200 2002 Trek 5200, KHS Flite, Koga Miyata, Schwinn Spitfire 5, Schwinn Speedster, Mondia Special, Univega Alpina, Miyata team Ti, MB3

Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 977 Post(s)
Liked 550 Times in 378 Posts
I've found when you hoard, you become the parts supplier for other people. I'd say stay with what you like and let the rest go.
curbtender is offline  
Old 09-01-20, 10:12 AM
  #25  
Hudson308 
Mr. Anachronism
 
Hudson308's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Somewhere west of Tobie's
Posts: 2,041

Bikes: fillet-brazed Chicago Schwinns, and some other stuff

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 509 Post(s)
Liked 204 Times in 140 Posts
Originally Posted by trail_monkey View Post
Anything I can clean polish regrease and reuse I will do so. But if I have to spend money to put anything together I don't think I'm game.
That seems like a reasonable strategy. Sometimes junk is just that.
__________________
"If we don't change direction soon, we'll end up where we're going." -Irwin Corey
Hudson308 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.