Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Amazing how your body remembers

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Amazing how your body remembers

Old 10-03-20, 11:38 PM
  #1  
badger_biker 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
badger_biker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Rural Western Wisconsin
Posts: 1,398

Bikes: 10 vintage touring machines

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 81 Post(s)
Liked 30 Times in 23 Posts
Amazing how your body remembers

This has happened to me before but not as pronounced. Last weekend I did a 2 day loaded overnight with 4 panniers of about 85 miles. I didn’t ride again for 4 days and when I did I took out my Schwinn Cimarron. So for the first mile or so the Cimarron with 2.3” Fat Franks felt twitchy and quick to me which it is far from either of those characteristics. My body still expected the feeling and control of the last tough day into a wind on the loaded touring bike.

Has anyone else experienced this?
__________________
Nothing compares to the simple pleasure of a bike ride - JFK
badger_biker is offline  
Old 10-04-20, 12:09 AM
  #2  
gugie 
Dilberteur at large
 
gugie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 8,925

Bikes: It's complicated.

Mentioned: 980 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3108 Post(s)
Liked 1,246 Times in 651 Posts
Originally Posted by badger_biker View Post
This has happened to me before but not as pronounced. Last weekend I did a 2 day loaded overnight with 4 panniers of about 85 miles. I didn’t ride again for 4 days and when I did I took out my Schwinn Cimarron. So for the first mile or so the Cimarron with 2.3” Fat Franks felt twitchy and quick to me which it is far from either of those characteristics. My body still expected the feeling and control of the last tough day into a wind on the loaded touring bike.

Has anyone else experienced this?
Definitely. My dedicated gravel bike feels weird for a few minutes until I adjust.

The funny thing I do when I change bikes is hunt around for the shift levers. I have bar dmd, down tubevommand shifters...
__________________
If someone tells you that you have enough bicycles and you don't need any more, stop talking to them. You don't need that kind of negativity in your life.
gugie is offline  
Old 10-04-20, 09:12 AM
  #3  
gomango 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: STP
Posts: 15,149
Mentioned: 70 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 787 Post(s)
Liked 146 Times in 99 Posts
Happened this summer to me.

We rode gravel from the north Twin Cities metro to Duluth and then trails up to Two Harbors.

I rode my Bilenky which was fully loaded with a tent, sleeping bag, change of clothes, food, Jetboil, fly rod and bag etc.

That bike was loaded as if the apocalypse was at hand.

It was a very slow ride, as it was very warm.

When I returned I hopped on my Stigmata which is sub 20 lbs.

I felt like I was 25 years old again and the bike was super fast.

Not twitchy, but one had to pay close attention to the road.

Sand patches are evil at speed.
__________________


Bikes and stuff

https://www.flickr.com/photos/36270004@N06/
gomango is offline  
Old 10-04-20, 09:40 AM
  #4  
The Golden Boy 
Extraordinary Magnitude
 
The Golden Boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Waukesha WI
Posts: 12,531

Bikes: 1978 Trek TX700; 1978/79 Trek 736; 1984 Specialized Stumpjumper Sport; 1984 Schwinn Voyageur SP; 1985 Trek 620; 1985 Trek 720; 1986 Trek 400 Elance; 1987 Schwinn High Sierra; 1990 Miyata 1000LT

Mentioned: 76 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2146 Post(s)
Liked 572 Times in 360 Posts
Almost exactly the same thing- Used to riding the tourers, then rode my sister's Trek 820. Maybe it was the handlebar width, but making a run down a relatively short, relatively steep hill was... "exhilarating." Shall we say...
__________________
*Recipient of the 2006 Time Magazine "Person Of The Year" Award*

Commence to jigglin’ huh?!?!

"But hey, always love to hear from opinionated amateurs." -says some guy to Mr. Marshall.
The Golden Boy is offline  
Old 10-07-20, 10:11 AM
  #5  
RobbieTunes
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 27,297
Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 378 Post(s)
Liked 1,368 Times in 882 Posts
My body remembers. My mind does not. I have:
SRAM 1x11 and 2x10. From what I understand, the new ones are different yet.
DA 2x11 STI, 2x10 DT indexed, 2x9 STI, 2x9 DT, and 2x6 DT indexed.
Ultegra 2x11, 2x10, 3x9, all STI, and 2x8 and 2x7 DT indexed.
Campagnolo 2x11 Ergo, 2/3x10 Ergo, 2x10 DT Synchro, 3x9 Ergo, 2x8 Synchro, 2x7 Synchro
Suntour 2x7 DT indexed, 2x6 DT friction, 2x5 DT friction.

Every ride, for at least 2 miles, is an adventure in brain failure.
It's a good thing my legs still adapt a bit quicker.
People think I'm versatile. I'm faking that.

Last edited by RobbieTunes; 10-08-20 at 03:40 PM.
RobbieTunes is offline  
Old 10-07-20, 10:50 AM
  #6  
northbend 
Senior Member
 
northbend's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: North Bend, Washington State
Posts: 2,378

Bikes: 1937 Hobbs; 1974 Alex Singer; 1977 Bruce Gordon; 1987 Bill Holland; 1988 Schwinn Paramount (Fixed gear); 1999 Fat City Yo Eddy (MTB); 2018 Woodrup (Touring)

Mentioned: 216 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 355 Post(s)
Liked 869 Times in 219 Posts
Yea, I can relate. After riding a loaded touring bike the summer of 2019 for 2.5 months it was downright scary to ride a racing bike like my Holland again when I got home.
While on tour, I rode a bit sans bags on the Woodrup and it felt a little squirrelly but nothing like hopping on a bike with a shorter wheelbase bike with racing geometry and lightweight tires.
Hoo-boy! The bike felt like it was going to jump away from me (especially in a sprint) and it took more than a few rides to get used to that.

Another situation that makes my heart jump is riding fixed again after a long period of exclusively riding freewheeled bikes.
t takes a concerted effort to remember to not coast.
Try that on a fixed gear bike and you feel like you're gonna get thrown over the handlebars.
Switching back the other way (fixed to free..) is never an issue for me.
northbend is offline  
Old 10-07-20, 11:50 AM
  #7  
Chinghis
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Southern California
Posts: 277

Bikes: Historical: Schwinn Speedster; Schwinn Collegiate; 1981 Ross Gran Tour; 1981 Dawes Atlantis; 1991 Specialized Rockhopper. Current: 1987 Ritchey Ultra; 1987 Centurion Ironman Dave Scott Master; 1992 Specialized Stumpjumper FS

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 104 Post(s)
Liked 59 Times in 38 Posts
Oh, yes, the body definitely remembers. I have ridden one bike exclusively since the last millennium - a 90s MTB with bar ends. Picked up a new old bike - an even older MTB. Basically the same bike, except that it has no bar ends. Yeah, guess what my body is used to reaching for almost anytime I get out of the saddle? And guess what's not there?! It's kind of alarming to start to stand and move my hands to where the bar ends should be.
Chinghis is offline  
Likes For Chinghis:
Old 10-08-20, 03:41 PM
  #8  
RobbieTunes
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 27,297
Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 378 Post(s)
Liked 1,368 Times in 882 Posts
My paper route bike instinctively zig-zagged up hills.
RobbieTunes is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.