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Italian fixed cup install: grease, thread lock, or ..?

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Italian fixed cup install: grease, thread lock, or ..?

Old 10-20-20, 08:17 PM
  #26  
jackbombay
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Originally Posted by merziac View Post
You can also use Super glue for Loctite, just don't get carried away.
For years I've referred to that as "clear loctite"!
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Old 10-20-20, 08:27 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by daka View Post
I thought teflon tape was to create a seal, not as a threadlock. The stuff is slippery, after all...
That's the beauty of teflon tape in plumbing: It not only seals the threads, it also lubricates them so you can screw the tapered fittings together a bit tighter. I would imagine it would do the same for a BB cup though I've never tried it. (But now that jiangshi has mentioned it I'm going to give it a try.)
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Old 10-20-20, 10:47 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by jiangshi View Post
Grease and Teflon tape.

Crank it on as tight as you can (within reason).
Teflon tape is the hot setup. Been using it for over a couple decades and never had a cup come loose. Works just like a nylok nut - fills the threads.
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Old 04-17-23, 09:03 PM
  #29  
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<bumpage>

For the new bike, a '91 Bottecchia Pro, it's gonna be grease and teflon tape.

​​​​​​
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Old 04-17-23, 10:57 PM
  #30  
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Whatever you put on the threads (I'm a blue Loctite guy myself), tighten the cup until it screams for mercy, then tighten it a little more, all while cursing whoever in Italia BITD thought a right-handed thread on a fixed cup was a good idea. In my experience, it should have taken about 10 miles, 12 tops, to know that was not the way to go.
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Old 04-17-23, 11:00 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by SurferRosa View Post
...cup, from a '72 Torpado, came loose fairly easily...
Sounds like another Urban Myth... Ha
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Old 04-17-23, 11:11 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by zandoval View Post
Sounds like another Urban Myth.
Why, because they're usually torqued so tight it's like they're welded to the frame?

If I'm not changing the crankset, I'm leaving the fixed cup in place. But I always check to see if it's tight. That particular one wasn't. It's not the first time, but, yeah, it's rare.
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Old 04-18-23, 06:06 AM
  #33  
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Grease, a wrap of Teflon plumbing tape, and tight. A proper fixed cup tool takes the worry away of never being able to loosen a tight cup. In any event, any cup that loosens was not sufficiently tight.
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Old 04-18-23, 07:51 AM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by bikingshearer View Post
Whatever you put on the threads (I'm a blue Loctite guy myself), tighten the cup until it screams for mercy, then tighten it a little more, all while cursing whoever in Italia BITD thought a right-handed thread on a fixed cup was a good idea. In my experience, it should have taken about 10 miles, 12 tops, to know that was not the way to go.
It was a cost-saving decision to use right-hand thread on both sides of the bottom bracket (French thread does this as well). You only need one type of tap, run it in one side and all the way through to the other, and you can be certain that both sides of the shell are tapped concentrically. Use of thread adhesive and/or a tool that supplies suitable torque ensures that the cup will not come loose in use.


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Old 04-18-23, 12:20 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
It was a cost-saving decision to use right-hand thread on both sides of the bottom bracket (French thread does this as well). You only need one type of tap, run it in one side and all the way through to the other, and you can be certain that both sides of the shell are tapped concentrically. Use of thread adhesive and/or a tool that supplies suitable torque ensures that the cup will not come loose in use.
That, unfortunately, makes sense. At least the Brits, Swiss, Japanese and Americans did not follow suit.

I don't know about the Belgians, Dutch, Germans or Taiwanese, but since I have never heard anyone complain about a Merckx or a Gazelle or a Giant fixed cup coming loose in the middle of a ride, I'm guessing they went the left-hand threaded fixed cup route as well. And if I'm wrong about, someone will set me straight. (It would not be the first time, it would not be the last.)
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Old 04-18-23, 12:29 PM
  #36  
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When we were setting up spacecraft for vibe testing , we used to use this stuff called Vibra-tite. Never hardened, like loctite does, so you can still remove the fasteners. Cleans up with MEK. Not cheap, but good for what you're looking to do.

https://www.amazon.com/Vibra-TITE-Th...770605137&th=1
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Old 04-18-23, 12:38 PM
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Originally Posted by SurferRosa View Post
I don't usually remove the fixed cup during an overhaul, but I do always check if it's secure. This Sugino cup, from a '72 Torpado, came loose fairly easily with an adjustable wrench. So I removed it for cleaning. Now, how to secure it? What's your method? Just a little bit of grease? An ample supply of blue Loctite? Some combo? (Does that even make sense?) I can't remember the last time I did this for an Italian...



And, yeah, it has Sugino cups and crankset and a Campy spindle.
test assemble in your hands. An early Record spindle will work, one designed for the thicker Nuovo record cups will not, the reverse spiraling moves the bearing tracks inboard.

I use a small amount of grease, a Campagnolo professional bottom bracket fixed cup tool, a bench vise and Torque.
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Old 04-18-23, 12:43 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by satbuilder View Post
When we were setting up spacecraft for vibe testing , we used to use this stuff called Vibra-tite. Never hardened, like loctite does, so you can still remove the fasteners. Cleans up with MEK. Not cheap, but good for what you're looking to do.

https://www.amazon.com/Vibra-TITE-Th...770605137&th=1
MEK... in California that is off the shelves now.
so is denatured alcohol as a cleaner. Possible to purchase as a camping stove fuel. Pricey though.
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Old 04-18-23, 12:45 PM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by repechage View Post
An early Record spindle will work, one designed for the thicker Nuovo record cups will not, the reverse spiraling moves the bearing tracks inboard.
It came to me that way with the Sugino cups and Campy spindle. Weird, right? I bought it from the original owner and the only things he changed out were the brakeset (now DA) and crankset (now mostly Sugino). He couldn't tell me why he did it, back in the mid '70s. I don't know if he didn't want to admit this Torpado originally came with Universal brakes and a cottered crank, or he just forgot.
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