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Putting suspension on old Bridgestone MB 2

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Putting suspension on old Bridgestone MB 2

Old 11-25-20, 06:52 PM
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shdwfx
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Putting suspension on old Bridgestone MB 2

Relatively new to the forum and can't post pics yet, but dusting off an old Bridgestone MB 2 (1991) that I bought new but haven't ridden much the past decade besides short rides with the kids. Anyways, it's still pretty much original and in good shape, but wondering if it makes sense to put a suspension fork on it (it has the original like an old RockShox or something. Would that change the geometry too much? How do I determine what size would fit? Thanks.
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Old 11-25-20, 07:50 PM
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Originally Posted by shdwfx View Post
Relatively new to the forum and can't post pics yet, but dusting off an old Bridgestone MB 2 (1991) that I bought new but haven't ridden much the past decade besides short rides with the kids. Anyways, it's still pretty much original and in good shape, but wondering if it makes sense to put a suspension fork on it (it has the original like an old RockShox or something. Would that change the geometry too much? How do I determine what size would fit? Thanks.
I am confused. Does it already have a suspension fork? Does it work?

Yes putting a suspension fork on a currently “rigid” will change the geometry and raise the the front of the 3+ inches depending on the model of the fork. On a ‘91 you likey have a 1” threaded fork so you need to measure from the bottom of the crown race to middle of the top nut and that is how long the steerer on the new fork needs to be
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Old 11-25-20, 08:08 PM
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If you have an original suspension fork it will be worth looking into refreshing it if able to be refreshed. Most of the modern forks that would work for that aren't all that great and weigh a ton.

We bought some stuff from these folks: https://www.suspensionforkparts.net/eshop/ for a original Manitou fork (Easton aluminum, a little purple gaaaawwwwwwjuuuussss)
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Old 11-25-20, 08:13 PM
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Sorry for the confusion. It has the original rigid Ritchey Logic fork and has never had a suspension fork. Thanks for the pic on the measurement and I was thinking it might have a 1" fork as well. Very helpful.
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Old 11-25-20, 08:43 PM
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This bike is contemporary with the very earliest MTB suspension forks. A restomod might be good with one of those if you cared to delve into that. It's kind of a side hobby to old mountain bikes. But no one has made a suspension fork for a 1in steerer in maybe 25 years, a new one is not something you can get. Easier is to get some up-to-date tires big as you can fit, and pump them soft as you dare.
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Old 11-25-20, 09:49 PM
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a vintage fork with 50-70mm of travel would work well on your frame. yes, it'll change things a bit, but not to a detriment. particularly on steep downhills

my first real mtb was a '93 GT backwoods. it did not come with a suspension fork nor was the geometry designed with one in mind. but, like everyone else back in those days, i put one on, anyway, not knowing anything about the effects it might have. i got a marzocchi xc-51 and had a lot of fun for years. i now have a marzocchi atom bomb on it with around 70mm travel. it looks odd sitting with the front end up a little more, but once on it you don't really notice. handles great

i see these older forks on ebay from time to time. sometimes needing rebuild, but often not. and, sometimes at "reasonable" prices...and sometimes not. otoh, i paid $85 at a thrift store for an early 90's raleigh mtb with a mix of stx and alivio parts and a rock shox fork with a 1 inch threadless steerer. thing looked like it had been ridden only a hand full of times. i'll use the parts on something else and recycle the frame, but i needed the fork for my same era scott tampico who's fork is blown out.

all that to say....forks are out there for your bike

ps should you find a compatible marzocchi bomber, there are refurb parts for them or you can have it rebuilt by the same source. i'll have to get back with that name. marzocchi guy...maybe?
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Old 11-25-20, 10:11 PM
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IMHO, I agree with Darth Lefty; get the biggest, squishiest tires you can put on and ride it! Squishy tires can do a lot to give you a comfy ride, without the extra weight and cost of a suspension fork.
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Old 11-25-20, 10:28 PM
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It would really very much depend on the headset. 1 inch threaded would leave you with very very few worthwhile options. As mentioned above, a 1 inch threaded suspension fork may be found, but even if it was, it'd probably not be worth your effort or something worth owning.

EDIT: I found this, but even if the steer tube were long enough, you'd also need a 1 inch threadless headset (if you could find one) & other bits. If it has elastomers, I wouldn't waste my time on it, though. A question to the seller for specifics would be in order.

If you are very fortunate, your bike has a 1&⅛ threaded headset. If this is the case, then it's as simple as buying a 1&⅛ threadless headset & non-tapered steerer'd brand new Rockshox Recon or Reba or if you are cheap a springer Manitou or other Suntour. Options-a-plenty & the 1990's were a wild west transition time in the mountain bike world.

Brakes, stems, front wheels and whatnot are another discussion not worth having if you aren't fortunate to have the options afforded by 1&⅛

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Old 11-25-20, 10:48 PM
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With a little searching, you could get your hands on one of these babies. The Marzocchi Z2 BAM. The fork that stepped up the game in the late 90's. Most of them have a 1" 1/8 steerer, but Marzocchi made them removable, so you could swap in a 1". Good luck finding that 1" steerer, but you could always have one made at a machine shop, maybe even just chop the steer tube off an old fork.

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Old 11-26-20, 09:01 AM
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I would keep the Ritchey hardnose.
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Old 11-26-20, 09:04 AM
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Yep. Just leave it alone and ride it.
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Old 11-26-20, 11:22 PM
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Thanks all for the comments. Given that it's likely a 1" steerer tube, I'll probably just keep my eye out on ebay or craigslist for one that's in good shape (not looking to drop a bundle on one though). In the meantime, I'll try the suggestions on playing around with the inflation pressures. I do plan on definitely keeping the rigid Ritchey fork but was just looking to mix things up a bit as I've never had a suspension fork before.
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Old 11-27-20, 12:08 AM
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i second the marzocchi notion...if you decide to do a fork. again, i've seen them on ebay. (i got my atom bomb at at thrift store for $25) those are very good forks. perhaps not by today's standard, but in the 90's everyone was just happy to have to cushion on rough trails. iow's, these older forks are not that bad...even the elastomers, if made by a good company...ie. rock shox, marz', manitou. futhermore, again, there is a source for the marz' parts...even the 1" steer tubes. roughly $30 for one of them should you need to swap. plus, 1" threadless headsets are easily found. i just got a ritchey for my mongoose a couple months ago on ebay or amazon...one of those places

just my 2 cents worth of opinion
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