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Seatpost help

Old 12-02-20, 01:14 PM
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Seatpost help

The seatpost on my old Peugeot is 26.8mm with about a 15mm setback. I just bought a new Brooks B17 Imperial saddle and could use a bit more setback. I have had no luck finding a 26.8mm seatpost with long setback online.....would anyone be able to point me in the right direction? Thanks for any help!
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Old 12-02-20, 01:18 PM
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Setback in spades, https://www.ebay.com/itm/SR-MTE-100-...wAAOSw-Upfw738
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Old 12-02-20, 01:52 PM
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This Nitto beauty from Rivendell might offer a bit more set back. Compare you measurements to the way they do their's to make sure. A tad spendy, but Nitto stuff is worth it.
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Old 12-02-20, 02:21 PM
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Thanks lots guys, looks like I’m in business!
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Old 12-02-20, 02:55 PM
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I always advise that if the rider finds their posterior sliding past the rear edge of the saddle, to first try raising the saddle in lieu or moving it rearward.

Not only does this spare the frame's seatpost opening (and the post, saddle rails and rear wheel) from damaging stress (especially as this seems to be more of a larger-rider thing), but the handling/stability of the bike is often improved with the saddle set further forward.

Lastly, the hill-climbing comfort, efficiency and speed improves with the saddle set further forward, as the rider more effortlessly/quickly can transition from seated to standing, with less knee stress apparent toward the end of longer rides!

Riders I have advised in this regard have told me years later that I was right about this, and I myself appreciate how my forward saddle also allows me to achieve a significantly lower, more-aero profile with less sharp of a bend in my lower back.
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Old 12-02-20, 08:25 PM
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Originally Posted by dddd View Post
I always advise that if the rider finds their posterior sliding past the rear edge of the saddle, to first try raising the saddle in lieu or moving it rearward.

Not only does this spare the frame's seatpost opening (and the post, saddle rails and rear wheel) from damaging stress (especially as this seems to be more of a larger-rider thing), but the handling/stability of the bike is often improved with the saddle set further forward.

Lastly, the hill-climbing comfort, efficiency and speed improves with the saddle set further forward, as the rider more effortlessly/quickly can transition from seated to standing, with less knee stress apparent toward the end of longer rides!

Riders I have advised in this regard have told me years later that I was right about this, and I myself appreciate how my forward saddle also allows me to achieve a significantly lower, more-aero profile with less sharp of a bend in my lower back.


Yes I agree but would suggest that experimentation is the road to success. There are many recipes for a comfortable position, many are counter intuitive and counter to each other. The OP should ensure first that the main body of the saddle is in the same line as the ground but experiment with a small declination. Also she should know that although a smaller length handlebar stem would seem to ensure a more comfortable attitude, the exact opposite might be the case, even with a higher saddle,
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Old 12-03-20, 04:12 PM
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Originally Posted by lhill View Post
The seatpost on my old Peugeot is 26.8mm with about a 15mm setback. I just bought a new Brooks B17 Imperial saddle and could use a bit more setback. I have had no luck finding a 26.8mm seatpost with long setback online.....would anyone be able to point me in the right direction? Thanks for any help!
I found this lightly used Truvativ 26.8mm post at our local Seattle used bike parts emporium a few years ago. The shaft was originally black before a bit of light sanding and polishing.

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Old 12-03-20, 05:56 PM
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Originally Posted by bikingshearer View Post
This Nitto beauty from Rivendell might offer a bit more set back. Compare you measurements to the way they do their's to make sure. A tad spendy, but Nitto stuff is worth it.
That's certainly one of the best 'posts ever, but it does not offer much more setback than the 18mm you already have. There is another on by Nitto, the S-84, which has between 30 and 35 mm , depending how you measure (another problem!).

I have a Brooks Swallow of recent years, and its frame offers more setback than that of the B17 or the Professional. But it is a lot narrower. For me I think that can work, but I would not vouch for anyone else.

As a solution, I like the Rivets, which have a little more setback, and the Selle AnAtomica, which have a lot more setback as well as a lot of flex in the leather. Setback is not just a function of rail length, but mainly that combined with the location of the front edge of the saddle clamp. Rivets have the leather flaps tied under the saddle body, but that often has interference with the top of the saddle clamp, impeding the shape and flex of the saddle, in turn reducing comfort. YMMV, but look carefully. The Brooks Swallow does not have that problem.
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Old 12-03-20, 09:29 PM
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Thank you all once again. I bought the SR MTE100 seatpost from Ebay, that will allow me to move my Brooks saddle back to achieve KOPS and a better balance overall. Right now I have too much weight on my hands. I certainly shouldn’t need all the setback that available on the new seatpost. Thanks!
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Old 12-03-20, 09:39 PM
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Couple of points on this subject that might help. Brooks style saddles usually need a bit of nose up or you will have too much weight on your hands. I too usually need a fair amount of setback to ride comfortably with my jacked up knees. My sweet spot is 8 3/8" setback for the center of a saddle of the center of the BB. I love Brooks saddle but have found the Gyes style leather saddle to have longer rails than Brooks which can help with the fit. Much cheaper and so far all of mine have been great to ride and hold up well.
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Old 12-03-20, 09:54 PM
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Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
+1 Excellent posts. Not light. I save a little weight taking off the quick release and using a standard bolt. Every one I've ever seen, including my two, have seen hard use and show it but everything works. They strike me as inelegant equivalents to the old Campy NR posts. You put them on, ride and forget about them for the next decade or three.
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Old 12-03-20, 10:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Road Fan View Post
That's certainly one of the best 'posts ever, but it does not offer much more setback than the 18mm you already have. There is another on by Nitto, the S-84, which has between 30 and 35 mm , depending how you measure (another problem!).

...
Another +1 Those posts have a lot of setback (nowhere near the SR M-100 mentioned above). They are also gems and despite being steel, are not heavy. Think quality steel frames. Lugged and quality steel. Also excellent workmanship on the clamp. A joy to install.

All but one of my bikes sports a big setback post. Not because my seats are all that far back but because I pick bikes with steep seattube angles and short chainstays for the most secure handling under this body. (I could seek out frames with bent seattubes, nut nah, not going there (at least yet). Also centered rails means that expensive ti railed seats are less likely to break than when clamped close to the bend in the rails. And I can change saddle setback at will and not think twice. So I ride the SR on one bike, the Nitto S84 on my namesake and two custom 160 mm setback posts on my two newest bikes. My old Trek 4somthing has a standard Campy Chorus to go with its "normal" seattube angle.
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