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PX10 Sympathetic Restoration

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PX10 Sympathetic Restoration

Old 02-07-21, 01:13 PM
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cdaniels
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PX10 Sympathetic Restoration

Hello all and thanks for checking out my post.
First off, if you don't know a "sympathetic restoration" is the disassembly and rebuilding without painting and replacing as few parts as possible to keep it original as you can.
I will post as I go along but I don't get to work on it every day.

I got my first PX10 a few weeks ago a 71 after a long search for one I could afford. It arrived and immediately I assembled it. I then checked over everything against the internet to be sure of what I had and that parts were correct. It then got a basic tune up and a wheel swap as the original sewups were no good. It rode great. I put on an extra set of sewups to test out the ride with the original rims and there is a audible clicking, I believe it might be the spokes as they are a little loose.

Here it is in the photos from ebay.







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Old 02-07-21, 01:22 PM
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Here is the bare frame after disassembly, nasty stuff there.



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Old 02-07-21, 01:30 PM
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After a good wash and scrubbing and some polishing.








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Old 02-07-21, 07:03 PM
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Nice. Let me say that the brazer of my 69 got much better by 1971.
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Old 02-07-21, 11:12 PM
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By the looks of the fork's rake, I'd guess that this is a 1973/74 model PX10E and not a 1971 model.

If you have an angle-finder tool and know how to use it, the distinction will be easy to spot since the 1972 and earlier models had relaxed 72-degree angles and the 73/74 models had frame angles more like 75 degrees and more.

The riding character of the newer and older models could not be more different, different strokes for different folks.

If you do have a '73 model there, then you are lucky to have received the 100mm stem on it. This was the longest length offered and does a lot to calm the very quick and responsive steering of the later models. The saddle may need to be moved near fully forward to suit this fit unless the rider is sized to the large end of this frame size's normal fit range.

There is a date cods on one of the cage plates of the rear derailer, easily visible fromthe left side of the assembled bike (and might read like 4 71 or some such).
A photo of this is shown in this photo:
https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl...gQMygBegQIARBU

NEWER fork rake:


OLDER fork rake:

Last edited by dddd; 02-07-21 at 11:28 PM.
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Old 02-08-21, 08:49 AM
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Originally Posted by dddd View Post
By the looks of the fork's rake, I'd guess that this is a 1973/74 model PX10E and not a 1971 model.
...
There is a date cods on one of the cage plates of the rear derailer, easily visible fromthe left side of the assembled bike (and might read like 4 71 or some such).
I liked this because it provides great insight and details a lot of folks glance over, and the specific angle details are great.

I'd only say one thing, and this isn't a criticism by any stretch: You never know what you'll find. Decent example, I have a "twinsie" I picked up awhile back, sporting older rake, stamped serial using some people's logic would suggest a '71, along with the relaxed angles suggesting it pre-'73, but derailleur cage showing '72 date code, which the fancy Nervex lugs would suggest otherwise, because folks say '72 was the oddball year non-fancy lugs were used. (I know some '72 PX-10 variants had fancy lugs, I've seen them). Needless to say: Your comment is spot-on, but I'd just add "the lines got a little squiggly in the early-mid 70s"

Pics of reference bike:



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Old 02-08-21, 11:13 AM
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Another feature that this frame is missing that a '71 and earlier frame would have is the horn on the non-driveside rear dropout. I thought '72 was the last year for curly lugs.
That is a nice condition frame, love the blue!
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Old 02-08-21, 12:16 PM
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-----

two other dating aids -

Verot reworked the model 93 chainset mid-year 1972 to put more material around the pedal hole

this photo from VB shows a mixed set

the drive side arem is early type with a heavy chamfer on the arm's distal end

the non-drive arm is late type with more material in the area

the set on the subject machine is later type




---

when Juy reworked this model of dropout to remove the wheel guide from the NDS

they also added a blister at the rear of the axle slot in preparation for giving the droput a threaded adjuster which came subsequently


-----
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Old 02-08-21, 02:42 PM
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Originally Posted by juvela View Post
-----
when Juy reworked this model of dropout to remove the wheel guide from the NDS

they also added a blister at the rear of the axle slot in preparation for giving the droput a threaded adjuster which came subsequently
Oui, ici:

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Old 02-08-21, 05:01 PM
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I think that in order to keep this a sympathetic restoration, you should replace the clunky looking front derailleur with a correct original Criterium model. Uncracked ones aren't that expensive, they work amazingly smooth on the original 52/45 chainrings, and last a long time if you oil the delrin once in a while. Plus they look really cool, the polish on the clamp is incredible.
Unless you're doing tours or something on this thing, then put a new XTR on the front.

Last edited by MB33; 02-08-21 at 05:04 PM.
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Old 02-08-21, 05:04 PM
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-----

another dating aid not as yet mentioned are the cycle's Juy quick release skewers

this model was last made in 1971

some of this model found their way onto 1972 model year machines

likely a case of manufacturers using up existing stock...

---

although the lug pattern for 1972 was nominally the smooth plain one there were some 1972 PX's which received the scrolly NERVEX Professional

it returned again for the 1973 model year and then was gone...


-----
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Old 02-08-21, 05:13 PM
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Originally Posted by juvela View Post
-----

another dating aid not as yet mentioned are the cycle's Juy quick release skewers

this model was last made in 1971

some of this model found their way onto 1972 model year machines

likely a case of manufacturers using up existing stock...

---

although the lug pattern for 1972 was nominally the smooth plain one there were some 1972 PX's which received the scrolly NERVEX Professional

it returned again for the 1973 model year and then was gone...


-----
Thanks for the lug info. One other thing to note is that the BB shell on OP's bike is more straight edged than the ones used on 71's and earlier.
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Old 02-08-21, 05:45 PM
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There is a date cods on one of the cage plates of the rear derailer, easily visible fromthe left side of the assembled bike (and might read like 4 71 or some such).
A photo of this is shown in this photo:
[/QUOTE]

The code on mine reads "3 72"
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Old 02-08-21, 05:46 PM
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Originally Posted by dddd View Post
By the looks of the fork's rake, I'd guess that this is a 1973/74 model PX10E and not a 1971 model.

If you have an angle-finder tool and know how to use it, the distinction will be easy to spot since the 1972 and earlier models had relaxed 72-degree angles and the 73/74 models had frame angles more like 75 degrees and more.

The riding character of the newer and older models could not be more different, different strokes for different folks.

If you do have a '73 model there, then you are lucky to have received the 100mm stem on it. This was the longest length offered and does a lot to calm the very quick and responsive steering of the later models. The saddle may need to be moved near fully forward to suit this fit unless the rider is sized to the large end of this frame size's normal fit range.

There is a date cods on one of the cage plates of the rear derailer, easily visible fromthe left side of the assembled bike (and might read like 4 71 or some such).
A photo of this is shown in this photo:
https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl...gQMygBegQIARBU

NEWER fork rake:


OLDER fork rake:
Originally Posted by francophile View Post
Oui, ici:

Mine has the blisters but they are drilled and taped. So does that make it a 73?
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Old 02-08-21, 05:47 PM
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Originally Posted by cdaniels View Post
There is a date cods on one of the cage plates of the rear derailer, easily visible fromthe left side of the assembled bike (and might read like 4 71 or some such).
A photo of this is shown in this photo:


The code on mine reads "3 72"
Congrats it's a 72! Very cool bike, blue paint with curly lugs is an awesome and quite rare combination.
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Old 02-08-21, 06:03 PM
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Originally Posted by MB33 View Post
Congrats it's a 72! Very cool bike, blue paint with curly lugs is an awesome and quite rare combination.
Thanks.
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Old 02-08-21, 09:33 PM
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Originally Posted by cdaniels View Post
Mine has the blisters but they are drilled and taped. So does that make it a 73?
@juvela can possibly say more than I can on dates, I practically failed my history classes in school due to my abhorrent ability to recall dates and times. I have similarly lameness with dates on everything, tube accoutrements inclusive, although I can usually nail within 1-4 years range most. (won't help here)

What I can tell you is two-fold. 1) It's definitely newer than mine, and/or it had luckier pulls from the supply bins than mine. 2) DO NOT lose those dropout spacers. In fact, if your dropouts are drilled and tapped already, I'd personally move to screws and sell your spacers here for $20-30 to someone who needs them to offset your cost and hook up any BF'ers in need. I don't need them, I still have a spare pair or two on-hand after sending two pairs (after one got lost) to another BF'er and hooking up another BF'er with my 2nd to last pair. That said, originals are becoming less and less common, thus more valuable, and I can't help but believe they'll fetch said price. Granted, I've been wrong before.

In this thread, I can't help but find myself in a similar position with mine to what imagine @cocoabeachcrab might've found himself with a certain Italvega frameset recently. You and I have virtually identical frames, albeit yours is one size up from mine, but is undoubtedly spotless compared to the one I currently have on-hand, which is a bittersweet feeling. I'll definitely make mine work, but man ... I'd love to have a blue one or red on in such amazing shape. I've had a lot of PX-10 pass through my hands over the years, but none in that condition while also my size.

Don't get me wrong, I don't feel they're the best bike for me in any of their wild geometries, I personally prefer the feel of Gitane's highest offerings for the same years, but I've always wanted to score that pristine "garage queen" sample in my size! Preferably in red, but ... man, the blue ones really do look awesome! I'm sure you'll do it justice! keep us posted.
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Old 02-08-21, 10:50 PM
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Originally Posted by dddd View Post
By the looks of the fork's rake, I'd guess that this is a 1973/74 model PX10E and not a 1971 model.

If you have an angle-finder tool and know how to use it, the distinction will be easy to spot since the 1972 and earlier models had relaxed 72-degree angles and the 73/74 models had frame angles more like 75 degrees and more.

The riding character of the newer and older models could not be more different, different strokes for different folks.

If you do have a '73 model there, then you are lucky to have received the 100mm stem on it. This was the longest length offered and does a lot to calm the very quick and responsive steering of the later models. The saddle may need to be moved near fully forward to suit this fit unless the rider is sized to the large end of this frame size's normal fit range.

There is a date cods on one of the cage plates of the rear derailer, easily visible fromthe left side of the assembled bike (and might read like 4 71 or some such).
A photo of this is shown in this photo:
https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl...gQMygBegQIARBU

NEWER fork rake:


OLDER fork rake:
Serial number 00xxxxx suggests 1970 (see my UO-8's S/N in my signature), although we have heard of Peugeot S/N inconsistencies.
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Old 02-08-21, 10:52 PM
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It is cool to see so many blue PX-10s starting to show up. All I ever saw back in the day were the white ones.
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Old 02-09-21, 07:24 AM
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Originally Posted by John E View Post
It is cool to see so many blue PX-10s starting to show up. All I ever saw back in the day were the white ones.
Yup...I have one too.

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Old 02-09-21, 10:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Sierra View Post
Yup...I have one too.

I hope to get a white frameset in 58cm or something that needs to be repainted.
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Old 02-09-21, 10:31 AM
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Got the brakes refurbished. Amazing how much better thing look when they are clean.
Here is before.

All disasembled

Clean and shiny

Before and after a good bath, much better.
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Old 02-12-21, 01:14 PM
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My latest entry level (sort of) project falls into the sympathetic restoration category and didn't even know it (I call it street restoring but like the sympathetic reference). This old Italian bike came to me in bone stock original and complete condition. I felt sorry (sympathy) for the old lady...

I wanted to keep it as original as I could but had to settle for a SR handle bar and Dura-Ace brake cable clips. Needless to say, the paint and art were shot...


A can of paint (two small cans in this instance coupled with some elbow grease. This is what my $250 got it looking like this today...
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Old 02-12-21, 01:34 PM
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Based on the fork crown on the 'newer fork rake' bike in the picture below it appears that the bike is a UX10 and not a PX10 (if fork is the original). They were identical except the original wheels (PX10 tubular and UX10 clincher) and the fork crown.

Originally Posted by dddd View Post
By the looks of the fork's rake, I'd guess that this is a 1973/74 model PX10E and not a 1971 model.

If you have an angle-finder tool and know how to use it, the distinction will be easy to spot since the 1972 and earlier models had relaxed 72-degree angles and the 73/74 models had frame angles more like 75 degrees and more.

The riding character of the newer and older models could not be more different, different strokes for different folks.

If you do have a '73 model there, then you are lucky to have received the 100mm stem on it. This was the longest length offered and does a lot to calm the very quick and responsive steering of the later models. The saddle may need to be moved near fully forward to suit this fit unless the rider is sized to the large end of this frame size's normal fit range.

There is a date cods on one of the cage plates of the rear derailer, easily visible fromthe left side of the assembled bike (and might read like 4 71 or some such).
A photo of this is shown in this photo:
https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl...gQMygBegQIARBU

NEWER fork rake:


OLDER fork rake:
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Old 02-12-21, 01:44 PM
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Originally Posted by cdaniels View Post
Got the brakes refurbished. Amazing how much better thing look when they are clean.
Here is before.

All disasembled

Clean and shiny

Before and after a good bath, much better.
The brake caliper turned out great. Iím looking forward to seeing more pics as you bring the bike back to life. I appreciate this thread!
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