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1993 Cannondale M800 BOTE

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1993 Cannondale M800 BOTE

Old 02-19-21, 09:01 AM
  #1  
retrodude
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1993 Cannondale M800 BOTE

Iíve been really into bicycles since the early 80s, when mountain bikes came out I started with a basic BRC unit and quickly moved to a Ritchey Ascent. Fitted as many XT parts as I could afford. I always drooled over Brodies, Fat Chance, etc, etc. My Ritchey was fantastic as well but Iíve always wanted to go next level. My grail bike would be a Klein (before they sold to Trek), any number of Kleins would fit the bill. Back in the late 80s early 90s I had an admiration for Trek/Cannondale/Specialized, some of the bigger top quality brands. Anyway, Cannondale was never a brand I drooled over. I always had respect and thought their sanded wells, American/built in-house frames were very cool, was always jealous of the listed frame weights, didnít like the cantilevered rear drop outs too much (at the time) Ö

Fast forward 25-30 years. Going through FB marketplace I noticed a pretty ugly Cannondale for $100. The Syncros seatpost and XT thumbies sold me right away, with the LX other parts it was a great parts bike at the very least. Talked him down to $90 and brought her home. Wouldnít be a problem to build up a vintage Cannondale and sell it right?

After stripping down to the frame and weighing it I started doing some research. Never took notice of the Beast of the East build, remembered the odd early version with the 24Ē rear wheel. Wheels started turning and before you knew it told the wife ďsorryĒ Iím keepiní itÖ

I have a bare frame aluminum GT Zaskar thatís polished and really like the look. After removing the rattle can blue paint I found it was one of the dark-blue-purplish ones with pink/fuchsia quick release and rear cantiís only. I needed a fork. Its has 1-1/4Ē steering, what to do? Ended up sourcing reducers, the best deal on a Pepperoni fork was unthreaded 1-1/8Ē steel steerer. The fork that I bought the bike with was 1-1/8Ē Rock Shox low end, with and extra crown race thrown in for good measure, not sure how the previous owner didnít die, plus 1-1/8Ē headsets and stems will be cheaper and easier to source.

Decided to go stripped of paint/polished and source decals. With black and silver only I wanted a bit of fun color. The decals I found had yellow in them so went with yellow grips instead of black (a first for me using non black) and a couple gold anodized (well more like orange) bits for chainring bolts and seat collar. Had to use the Dura-Ace RD I grabbed last year for $20 all scratched up which I then polished (yes, it needs a cable anchor trick to work with any other Shimano 7 speed shifter)

The flat carbon bar has been sitting, waiting for a couple years due to itís larger clamp diameter which came off a bike that needed a riser. Figured with the threadless fork I could go a bit modern in the steering area, then threw on the more modern Ritchey carbon railed saddle (yellow accents too &#128522. The Innova tires are crasy light at 618g a pair, love the skin wall look, Iím confident the minimal knobbies will be fine for the smooth trails I take me old school fully rigid MTBs on.

I was worried about the high BB at 13Ē. Here I am putting all this work and close to $500 into this project, what if I donít like the ride? Yikes!

Okay, so pretty long story, I know. What follows are pictures only. She weights 19.75lbs, I basically put almost every lightest version of a part on it as a light weight build. Drum roll ..Ö it rides amazingly well. If not my favorite vintage MTB itís in my top three with my Kona and Rocky Mountain. And I can say I have a real and proper Cannondale, built in the USA









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Old 02-19-21, 09:08 AM
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I like the bare polished look, but do you have any surface protection other that polish? I am wondering how this would stand up to corrosion. Admittedly, most corrosion I have seen on aluminium bikes starts under the paint, likely where moisture and other crap gets trapped.
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Old 02-19-21, 09:16 AM
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Well that was a lot of work!
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Old 02-19-21, 09:24 AM
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That looks amazing. The 7400 rear derailleur is the cherry on the top.
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Old 02-19-21, 09:49 AM
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Originally Posted by bikeaddiction1 View Post
I like the bare polished look, but do you have any surface protection other that polish? I am wondering how this would stand up to corrosion. Admittedly, most corrosion I have seen on aluminium bikes starts under the paint, likely where moisture and other crap gets trapped.
Really good point. One big factor for me is that with bikes like these and others, I store them indoors and they are wiped down after every ride, usually only ridden in dry weather. My unpainted GT Zaskar has held up nicely for over a year now. The first time I took the anodization off a part top to polish out scratches was my 1st gen C-Record cranks, many years ago, so no more protection anymore. I've done a repeat minimal effort polish from time time to time.
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Old 02-19-21, 11:10 AM
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Iím a fan of older Cannondales. Awesome job on that one, it looks great. I live and ride on a barrier island and these frames hold up great. A good wipe down when theyíre filthy and I havenít seen any corrosion on my frames. Mine are painted, but thereís plenty of paint missing too.
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Old 02-19-21, 05:32 PM
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I fixed up an M800 for my sister in law. It was purple with matching anodizing on the brakes. I showed her your post and asked what she thought. She likes it but she does not want to polish. The paint on hers is in very good condition though.
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Old 02-20-21, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by bikeaddiction1 View Post
I fixed up an M800 for my sister in law. It was purple with matching anodizing on the brakes. I showed her your post and asked what she thought. She likes it but she does not want to polish. The paint on hers is in very good condition though.
Have to say I agree with her, the stock paint is amazing if in good condition, here is a photo of one probably similar to your sister in law's
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Old 02-20-21, 11:31 AM
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I commented on this one briefly in the mtb section, but again —- lots of work but it resulted in a really nice MTB!

thanks for sharing
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Old 02-20-21, 11:51 AM
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Originally Posted by retrodude View Post
Have to say I agree with her, the stock paint is amazing if in good condition, here is a photo of one probably similar to your sister in law's
That's it, except for frame colour, and I installed a women's saddle and shorter stem to fit her better. The welds are really nice on Cannondale Aluminum frames which are obviously machined smooth after welding It makes your polishing easier and looks better.
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Old 02-20-21, 12:41 PM
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Super nice finish! Did you use a mechanical process to get the high polish or done all by hand?
Btw I recently grabbed this garaged 97 SM800 with weird rollercam brakes. Pretty small frame with 24” wheels so thinking about converting to neo-bmx (bmx bars, delete front brake and fd). Cannondale welds are beautiful.

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Old 02-21-21, 06:43 PM
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Quick Stops!

Gotta' love those roller cam brakes, if discs stop you faster I'd be surprised!
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Old 02-22-21, 03:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Wilbur76 View Post
Super nice finish! Did you use a mechanical process to get the high polish or done all by hand?
Btw I recently grabbed this garaged 97 SM800 with weird rollercam brakes. Pretty small frame with 24Ē wheels so thinking about converting to neo-bmx (bmx bars, delete front brake and fd). Cannondale welds are beautiful.

I saw this posted a little while back, super nice color. Yes, a unique C-Dale, the roller cams are cool and work well, definitely loose the rear rack. I like your 24" BMX build idea, with 1" steering you have a few options on a stem change too if you felt the urge. Please share if you decide to do a conversion!
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Old 02-22-21, 04:22 PM
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Originally Posted by cannonride15 View Post
Gotta' love those roller cam brakes, if discs stop you faster I'd be surprised!
Yes theyíre really grabby and probably enough to confidently stop since Iím thinking of removing the front ones in my bmx conversion. Probably shed a pound or two.
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Old 02-24-21, 03:07 PM
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No Stopping

Really can't recommend removing front brake which is responsible for about 80% of total braking power. Personally I would not remove either brake if you ride in automobile prevalent roadways, you need all the stopping you can get! Personally I do not share the obsession for lowering bike weight, but I ride on flat terrain where this makes little difference. Doubt you'll save as much as a pound if you remove cable, brake lever, and caliper; but your bike and your life.
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