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Handlebar Brands measured end to end.

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Handlebar Brands measured end to end.

Old 03-03-21, 05:58 PM
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avhed
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Handlebar Brands measured end to end.

Handlebar Brands measured end to end. 25.0 to 26.4 bars that is
The old 3ttt, old ITM, Deda , GB9 (old brand) SR (old brand) Bontrager, Easton, Syntace, Ritchey Are there any others?

Last edited by avhed; 03-09-21 at 05:07 PM.
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Old 03-03-21, 06:19 PM
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juvela
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not sure what u r asking...

for drop bar width the industry "standard" is to measure centre-to-centre

however, one major producer who measures end-to-end/side-to-side is Tecno Tubo Torino (3TTT)


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Old 03-03-21, 08:07 PM
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clubman
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And you didn't list the biggie, Cinelli, which generally came in sizes 38 to 44 cm. There's been a slow move to wider bars over the decades. I love a 46 but it starts to look funny.
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Old 03-03-21, 09:40 PM
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SurferRosa
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I measure the bars on my bikes, and they're all just whack odd numbers.
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Old 03-04-21, 07:13 AM
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Trakhak
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Originally Posted by clubman View Post
And you didn't list the biggie, Cinelli, which generally came in sizes 38 to 44 cm. There's been a slow move to wider bars over the decades. I love a 46 but it starts to look funny.
And there's an even more recent toward narrower bars now, at least among the pros. Widths of 38 and even 36 mm are starting to be used. You'd think track sprinters would need wide bars for leverage if anyone did, but they've used narrower bars for years.
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Old 03-04-21, 09:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Trakhak View Post
You'd think track sprinters would need wide bars for leverage if anyone did, but they've used narrower bars for years.
I think it's a case of aerodynamics over leverage.
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Old 03-04-21, 10:13 AM
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Originally Posted by due ruote View Post
I think it's a case of aerodynamics over leverage.
That makes good sense.
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Old 03-04-21, 12:50 PM
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Trakhak
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Originally Posted by due ruote View Post
I think it's a case of aerodynamics over leverage.
As it was explained to me when I was being introduced to velodrome racing in 1965, the use of handlebars narrower than cyclists' shoulders reduced the likelihood of riders being "hooked" while competing in match sprints or riding in tight packs in points races. The speeds sprint specialists reach in competing on the track make it obvious that the amount of leverage available with narrow bars is more than sufficient, even for the strongest riders.

Crank arm length is similarly restricted to 165 mm for most velodrome racing, to reduce the possibility of crashes caused by pedal strikes.

Last edited by Trakhak; 03-04-21 at 12:55 PM.
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