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Disc brakes,, they dont look nice..

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Disc brakes,, they dont look nice..

Old 03-10-21, 11:57 AM
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Originally Posted by shoota
What are you talking about they look awesome!
The colors don't clash enough
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Old 03-10-21, 12:25 PM
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Originally Posted by scuzzo
why would any one want to post a picture of some disc brake bike on a thread that says in the title they dont look nice? but what ever... keep them on your mountain bike.... just glad we did not adopt the spring fork from them....

yet,,,,,,
Because the photo provides a visual of a very classic yet modern bike. The titanium disc frame that permitted the wide tires is like a modern classic....

One design ethic that existed in the rim brake era that has not migrated well to the modern (road disc) era well is that of customization.

Back in the day road racing bikes had so many mix and match component options that made building your own bike with your choice of components really distinguished the person’s bike and made it identifiable to fellow riders (riding friends, fellow bike club members) for all the cool things that gave that particular person’s ride it’s own mojo, so to speak.

Probably for safety and reliability reasons, the major disc brake manufacturers use of standardization is understandable. Calipers are generally black, brake hoses are black.

I have perused on-line European bike part suppliers who carry fun alternative parts that capture my imagination and stimulate my middle aged mental hobby of envisioning my next, cooler than ever retro/modern bike build. And it is a colorful, steampunk kind of vision with orange anodized brake calipers and disc rims, bad ass tubeless road tires, stainless steel braid brake lines, one piece handlebar/stem combos that compliment the ride, hydraulic aero brake levers devoid of shifter mechanisms... you get the idea?

The deep pool of fantastically positive, non-snarky individuals on the classic and vintage forum are largely non-polarizing, typically possessing an inherent aesthetic spider-sense of the right-ness of a given design be it vintage, modern or more often, a thoughtful integration of multiple eras of design sensibility.

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Old 03-10-21, 12:54 PM
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Don’t get me started on brifters now.
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Old 03-10-21, 02:27 PM
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I have a tough time saying this road bike looks bad due to disc brakes. And I dont think I would find it better looking if it had rim brakes. Its just a good looking bike either way.
Quality steel main and rear triangles, carbon fork, disc brakes, 44mm head tube. Looks sharp to me.


Rim brake bikes can also look awesome. Its possible for both styles to look nice.
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Old 03-10-21, 02:35 PM
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Originally Posted by jeirvine
Aesthetics aside, I don't get the pros using them for road racing. A wheel change is maybe 10-15 seconds with a rim brake, but can be minutes with a disc wheel, even with a top notch roadside tech. American Quinn Simmons was in the break late in the Strade Bianche race last week, and lost minutes from a flat tire. Coulda been a contender had he been riding rim brakes.
They use the sponsor's tech. Its tough for Movistar to use rim brakes when Canyon doesnt offer them. EF isnt riding rim brake Cannondale bikes if Cannondale has a contract for EF to ride disc brakes.
Is Ineos the only team on rim brakes this season?
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Old 03-10-21, 02:36 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by scuzzo
why would any one want to post a picture of some disc brake bike on a thread that says in the title they dont look nice? but what ever...
Its the internet- its what happens when someone starts a thread only to complain about technology. Even in a forum which celebrates old tech, it happens.
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Old 03-10-21, 03:30 PM
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Originally Posted by thook
all in the eye of the beholder. imo, it depends....i've seen some applications that don't float my boat, but others that do. this one grabs me...


practically speaking, need for disc brakes is relative. they are fantastic on steep hills with a heavy load. plus, if you contend with icy/snowy conditions. i've had rims w/canti's get icy and, having not realized, began a descent and found i could not stop. that scared the puhjeezus out of me.
I have not followed Riv' they "accept" disc brakes... Hmmm.
Actually, I can see a front, but wonder why the placement always almost 100% of the time on the lefthand side.
On a steel fork.
for the rear, the extra effort to install and possibly needing a "thru" axle... a rear caliper is not used that much in percentage of braking, for cyclocross, OK, of off road, OK for most street work as noted only in real adverse condition, do I think it would be worth the bother.
Now, as a SoCal rider, rare is the real need but be interested to reference if the potential for better modulation is the ticket.
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Old 03-10-21, 03:42 PM
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Originally Posted by hazetguy
if i did that, i would be banned from the site.
More time to use that microwave!
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Old 03-10-21, 03:58 PM
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr
They use the sponsor's tech. Its tough for Movistar to use rim brakes when Canyon doesnt offer them. EF isnt riding rim brake Cannondale bikes if Cannondale has a contract for EF to ride disc brakes.
Is Ineos the only team on rim brakes this season?
I believe that is correct. The Cycling Weekly bike guide shows the UAE Colnagos with rim brakes, but the bikes at the UAE Tour and Strade Bianche were definitely disc.

https://www.cyclingweekly.com/news/p...s-guide-489754

Very quickly the top bikes from all manufacturers are moving away from rim brakes, whether we like it or not.
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Old 03-10-21, 04:05 PM
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr
I have a tough time saying this road bike looks bad due to disc brakes. And I dont think I would find it better looking if it had rim brakes. Its just a good looking bike either way.
Quality steel main and rear triangles, carbon fork, disc brakes, 44mm head tube. Looks sharp to me.


Rim brake bikes can also look awesome. Its possible for both styles to look nice.

I ordered a Faran.

Haven't received it yet, but I am collecting components.


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Old 03-10-21, 04:06 PM
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Originally Posted by repechage
I have not followed Riv' they "accept" disc brakes... Hmmm.
Actually, I can see a front, but wonder why the placement always almost 100% of the time on the lefthand side.
On a steel fork.
for the rear, the extra effort to install and possibly needing a "thru" axle... a rear caliper is not used that much in percentage of braking, for cyclocross, OK, of off road, OK for most street work as noted only in real adverse condition, do I think it would be worth the bother.
Now, as a SoCal rider, rare is the real need but be interested to reference if the potential for better modulation is the ticket.
i posted a link in a later reply on the guy/bike's story. so, riv doesn't "accept" discs, the guy had the frame repaired and modified for them. as well, he converted it to 650b

i'd read sometime back as to why the brake is on the fork's left side. made sense as to why from what i'd read. perhaps i could find that source, again
edit: it might be that manufacturers would then have to produce right and left specific calipers. with side uniformity the don't have to. as well, it's not the best idea to mount the caliper front side of the fork drop out since calipers are only made for left side

not sure why people say rear brakes aren't used that much. i use mine as much maybe more on and off road. maybe just muscle memory/habit growing up on bmx bikes where using the front could result in a crash. and, "skidding out" was, of course, the most fun way to come to a stop

Last edited by thook; 03-10-21 at 04:16 PM.
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Old 03-10-21, 09:49 PM
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Originally Posted by scuzzo
why would any one want to post a picture of some disc brake bike on a thread that says in the title they dont look nice? but what ever... keep them on your mountain bike.... just glad we did not adopt the spring fork from them....

yet,,,,,,
Cause when people start rambling nonsense of discs only being on cookie cutter carbon bikes pics help to refute the fact. There are now multiple steel and ti bikes, not carbon, all running disc.
Deciding their ugly just cause they're modern is pointless as well but that's a different close minded issue, looks wise they have it all over weinmann 999 brakes but that's just my view.
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Old 03-10-21, 10:53 PM
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Originally Posted by NatusEstInSuht
Disc brakes have their place on road bikes, especially if you're riding in wet conditions or are descending down steep and long hills or mountains.
I seek out the steepest longest mountain roads in the western USA and my rim brakes do just great, I can easily apply enough front brake to lift my rear tire off the ground despite moving my butt well behind the seat, I could obviously do this with dsc brakes with less finger force on the brake lever, but my hands are tough and a dual pivot side pull already provides more braking power than I can actually use.
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Old 03-11-21, 10:47 AM
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Originally Posted by jackbombay
I seek out the steepest longest mountain roads in the western USA and my rim brakes do just great, I can easily apply enough front brake to lift my rear tire off the ground despite moving my butt well behind the seat, I could obviously do this with dsc brakes with less finger force on the brake lever, but my hands are tough and a dual pivot side pull already provides more braking power than I can actually use.

Can you do this with a 40-50 pound load on the bike under wet conditions?

I've tried on my Bilenky tourer and had less than favorable results.

It scared the daylights out of me and that's why my next tourer will have discs.
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Old 03-11-21, 11:19 AM
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Originally Posted by gomango
Can you do this with a 40-50 pound load on the bike under wet conditions?

I've tried on my Bilenky tourer and had less than favorable results.

It scared the daylights out of me and that's why my next tourer will have discs.
I don't care what kind of brakes you have. That's just a dumb idea anyway.
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Old 03-11-21, 11:41 AM
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Originally Posted by scuzzo
all carbon bikes are so cookie cutter then the only way you can tell who is who is by reading the down tube.
Yet, we can almost always find a current/recent thread in C&V asking "what bike is this?" with pics of an older steel frame. I would bet a medium sum of money that I could change the decals on my old Nishiki, and there are only a small handful of people who would recognize what it really is. Are things significantly different with new bikes? Probably not...except to the people who are familiar with the subtle differences. Same as it ever was.
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Old 03-11-21, 12:11 PM
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Originally Posted by krakhaus
I don't care what kind of brakes you have. That's just a dumb idea anyway.
It rains in other parts of the country. And when touring, you ride in wet conditions from time to time.

Are you suggesting any time the ground is wet people touring just not ride?
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Old 03-11-21, 12:13 PM
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Originally Posted by gomango
I ordered a Faran.

Haven't received it yet, but I am collecting components.
When is delivery expected? That Faran setup is great and similar to what I have done multiple times for 1-4 day trips- front bags and seatpost bag.
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Old 03-11-21, 12:35 PM
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr
It rains in other parts of the country. And when touring, you ride in wet conditions from time to time.

Are you suggesting any time the ground is wet people touring just not ride?
I was a bike messenger in Seattle for 12 years. I don't know if you've been to Seattle, but you might say it rains there pretty frequently and there are hills. My point was that it doesn't matter what kind of brakes you have, if you lock that front wheel up, you're going down.
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Old 03-11-21, 12:46 PM
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Originally Posted by krakhaus
I was a bike messenger in Seattle for 12 years. I don't know if you've been to Seattle, but you might say it rains there pretty frequently and there are hills. My point was that it doesn't matter what kind of brakes you have, if you lock that front wheel up, you're going down.
man, what you've just said is in no way related what you said prior....lol. maybe you're just feeling salty and need a place to vent?
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Old 03-11-21, 12:55 PM
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Originally Posted by NatusEstInSuht
Disc brakes have their place on road bikes, especially if you're riding in wet conditions or are descending down steep and long hills or mountains.

For most applications, brakes are meant to slow you down and rim brakes work great. But there's no doubting that modern hydraulic disc brakes offer superior stopping power.

That being said, I much prefer rim brakes for their ease and cost of maintenance.
I think that is total crap passed around until people start to believe it. I have been riding calipers in wet and down steep hills for 50 years with never a problem. It is just not a true statement.

and yes disc's are ugly, heavy, make noise and fade on steep descents.
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Old 03-11-21, 12:58 PM
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Originally Posted by gomango
Can you do this with a 40-50 pound load on the bike under wet conditions?

I've tried on my Bilenky tourer and had less than favorable results.

It scared the daylights out of me and that's why my next tourer will have discs.
Originally Posted by krakhaus
I don't care what kind of brakes you have. That's just a dumb idea anyway.


Originally Posted by thook
man, what you've just said is in no way related what you said prior....lol. maybe you're just feeling salty and need a place to vent?
What I said, if you read the thread in chronological order, is that it's dumb to brake hard in wet conditions, regardless of what kind of brakes you have. I stand by my statement.
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Old 03-11-21, 01:24 PM
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Originally Posted by krakhaus
What I said, if you read the thread in chronological order, is that it's dumb to brake hard in wet conditions, regardless of what kind of brakes you have. I stand by my statement.
no, dude....that's not what you said even if it is what you meant. you're reply was more vague. furthermore, gomango said nothing about "braking hard" much less front brake lock up. you can't compare being a bike messenger to hauling weight....weather dry or wet.....in the hills. nothing beats discs for that purpose
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Old 03-11-21, 01:44 PM
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Originally Posted by NatusEstInSuht
Disc brakes have their place on road bikes, especially if you're riding in wet conditions or are descending down steep and long hills or mountains.

For most applications, brakes are meant to slow you down and rim brakes work great. But there's no doubting that modern hydraulic disc brakes offer superior stopping power.

That being said, I much prefer rim brakes for their ease and cost of maintenance.
Originally Posted by Mike_Kelly
I think that is total crap passed around until people start to believe it. I have been riding calipers in wet and down steep hills for 50 years with never a problem. It is just not a true statement.

and yes disc's are ugly, heavy, make noise and fade on steep descents.
As a person who lives in British Columbia and rides the paved roads of the mountains just north of Vancouver, I can assure you that properly adjusted hydraulic disc brakes do not fade or make noises on steep descents. Squealing or fading disc brakes are result of a poor mechanic or end-of-life brake pads.

I ride up and then descend down North Vancouver's Mt. Seymour Road about half-a-dozen times each year. This is a 10-plus kilometre (6.7 miles) road with 950 metres (3,100 feet) of elevation which has an average gradient of 8.7%. Its average gradient is higher than that of the climb to L'Alpe D'Huez. There are no flat sections - you're either climbing up or going down. I've ridden it on bikes shod with caliper and disc brakes. There is no question that my disc brake bikes offer far better performance going downhill, especially if I'm using carbon rims and tubular tires. Rims and tires stay cooler with disc brakes compared with caliper brakes.

I never claimed caliper brakes are not up to the job. Most modern examples are very good and I normally prefer riding bikes with them but caliper brakes do not offer the same level of performance in the wet and under constant heavy use compared with disc brakes.
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Old 03-11-21, 01:52 PM
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Originally Posted by NatusEstInSuht
..... but caliper brakes do not offer the same level of performance in the wet and under constant heavy use compared with disc brakes.
i love rim brakes myself. but, to further your sentiments, i have a friend who only uses a car to pull a boat or travel cross country. otherwise, for at least over 20 years, he gets around town by bike where you can't go very far and not hit hills. he hauls his trailer with groceries, garden supplies, and more. once he got a gunnar w/discs for the job, he never rides his cross check, anymore
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