Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Cable routing for bar end shifters

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Cable routing for bar end shifters

Old 04-03-21, 05:01 PM
  #1  
bikemig 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 18,438

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 158 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5079 Post(s)
Liked 1,643 Times in 1,081 Posts
Cable routing for bar end shifters

I thought that the right way to route the cables for bar end shifters was to run them up the bars so that they come out underneath the brake levers. That's the way I was taught to do them when I worked in a shop and that's how I set up my 70s Fuji Finest. Then I saw a pic of how Mariano Basso had his bar end shifters set up. Whoa, he had his mechanic set them up so that they ran all the way underneath the tape and came out near the handlebars. It just happens that I picked up a 1971 Witcomb with all campy stuff including campy bar end shifters. The cable housing on that bike is set up just like Mariano did it. Who the heck am I to argue with Mariano Basso . . .


70s Fuji Finest

1971 Witcomb as found in the "wild"

Basso's bike
bikemig is offline  
Old 04-03-21, 05:22 PM
  #2  
Roger M 
Senior Member
 
Roger M's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Snohomish, WA.
Posts: 2,334
Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 192 Post(s)
Liked 376 Times in 142 Posts
I know back in the day most people dumped them out below the brake levers like your first photo. I prefer the cables hidden more, and exiting near the stem.

Nowadays there's some better cable and housing options that have less friction, so the second option functions better now(as opposed to back in the day).

But, to each his own..

BTW, very nice bikes.
Roger M is offline  
Likes For Roger M:
Old 04-03-21, 05:30 PM
  #3  
scozim 
Ellensburg, WA
 
scozim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Ellensburg, WA
Posts: 3,656

Bikes: See my signature

Mentioned: 71 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 279 Post(s)
Liked 239 Times in 104 Posts
Originally Posted by Roger M View Post
I know back in the day most people dumped them out below the brake levers like your first photo. I prefer the cables hidden more, and exiting near the stem.

Nowadays there's some better cable and housing options that have less friction, so the second option functions better now(as opposed to back in the day).

But, to each his own..

BTW, very nice bikes.
I tend to side with Roger - I like to run mine up to the stem and keep them more hidden. So far no problems in shifting.
__________________
1984 Gitane Sprint; 1984 Gitane Tour de France; 1982 Trek 610; 1968 Peugeot PL8; 1982 Nishiki Marina 12; 1972 Peugeot PX-10; 1984 Peugeot PSV; 1993 Trek 950 mtb; 1997 Klein Pulse Comp mtb; 1989 Peugeot Limestone hybrid (for touring); 1975 Gitane Olympic; 1982 Nishiki Maxima, 1983 Vitus 979; Custom late-80's Rodriguez


scozim is offline  
Old 04-03-21, 05:32 PM
  #4  
lasauge 
Pedalin' Erry Day
 
lasauge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Newbury Park, CA
Posts: 1,017
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 600 Post(s)
Liked 106 Times in 62 Posts
Both options work. Like Roger M and Mariano Basso I prefer mine to exit near the stem, otherwise the housing can get in the way of fingers when riding in the drops. Looking cleaner is an extra bonus, and the extra housing doesn't seem to add any significant friction.
__________________
Reach me faster by email.
lasauge is offline  
Old 04-03-21, 05:40 PM
  #5  
Kabuki12
Senior Member
 
Kabuki12's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Ventura County ,California
Posts: 1,655

Bikes: 1973 Windsor Profesional,1976 Kabuki diamond formula with full Campy, 1977 Raleigh Competition GS , 1971 Stella original Campy equip. 1978 Raleigh Super Grand Prix, 1972 Italvega Gran Rally ,1972 Super Mondia Special,Medici Pro Strada,Colnago

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 371 Post(s)
Liked 571 Times in 385 Posts
My Mondia has Campy bar ends and the cables exit near the stem and loop across each other slightly to avoid a sharper bend . I have a photo from 1973 of my bike and that’s how it came back then.
Kabuki12 is offline  
Old 04-03-21, 05:56 PM
  #6  
Rooney 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 106

Bikes: '85 Schwinn Voyageur SP; '80 Trek 710

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 49 Post(s)
Liked 55 Times in 29 Posts
Another vote for exiting at the stem. Much cleaner look, especially if you’re running aero brake levers too.
Rooney is online now  
Old 04-03-21, 06:10 PM
  #7  
steelbikeguy
Senior Member
 
steelbikeguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Peoria, IL
Posts: 2,489
Mentioned: 67 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 911 Post(s)
Liked 707 Times in 378 Posts
an extra twist on the idea of routing the cables all the way up to the center of the bars... instead of the right shifter cable going to the right cable stop on the down tube, route it over to the cable stop on the left side of the down tube. Similarly, route the left shifter cable to the cable stop on the right side of the downtube. To get the cables to the correct derailleur, the cables will cross from left to right, and visa versa, under the down tube.

The reason to do this is to avoid having the cable housing rubbing on the head tube.

Haven't tried this myself... I use the traditional method of having the cables exit the bar tape at the bottom of the bar's curve....



Steve in Peoria
steelbikeguy is offline  
Old 04-03-21, 06:19 PM
  #8  
The Golden Boy 
Extraordinary Magnitude
 
The Golden Boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Waukesha WI
Posts: 12,681

Bikes: 1978 Trek TX700; 1978/79 Trek 736; 1984 Specialized Stumpjumper Sport; 1984 Schwinn Voyageur SP; 1985 Trek 620; 1985 Trek 720; 1986 Trek 400 Elance; 1987 Schwinn High Sierra; 1990 Miyata 1000LT

Mentioned: 76 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2206 Post(s)
Liked 707 Times in 430 Posts
I've done it with the cables going out at the drop bend, I've done it with 'criss cross' cables so you have nicer arcs and I've done it under the wraps.

With modern cable and housing, there's really no reason to NOT do it all under the wraps- the friction difference is negligible. Unless you like the looks of the "traditional" ways.

Then again, if you're using a front rack and a rack bag- you really want it to go under the wraps since the cables will interfere with the bag.

Under the wraps (with aero levers)

IMG_0220 by Dave The Golden Boy, on Flickr


The arcs of the cables with the 'criss cross' cables- it's so much easier to get right- and it looks more pleasing to me.

CrissCrossCables by Dave The Golden Boy, on Flickr

CrissCrossFront by Dave The Golden Boy, on Flickr



To do that ^ you need to have the cables crossed at some other point- it's easiest under the downtube. Of course, this can be problematic if your cables don't go under the BB.

UnderDownTube by Dave The Golden Boy, on Flickr



I wish I would have taken some better, non-cluttered pix when I had the bike set up that way.
__________________
*Recipient of the 2006 Time Magazine "Person Of The Year" Award*

Commence to jigglin’ huh?!?!

"But hey, always love to hear from opinionated amateurs." -says some guy to Mr. Marshall.
The Golden Boy is offline  
Likes For The Golden Boy:
Old 04-03-21, 06:34 PM
  #9  
Ronsonic 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Sunny Tampa, Florida
Posts: 1,506
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 91 Post(s)
Liked 34 Times in 26 Posts
Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
I thought that the right way to route the cables for bar end shifters was to run them up the bars so that they come out underneath the brake levers. That's the way I was taught to do them when I worked in a shop and that's how I set up my 70s Fuji Finest. Then I saw a pic of how Mariano Basso had his bar end shifters set up. Whoa, he had his mechanic set them up so that they ran all the way underneath the tape and came out near the handlebars. It just happens that I picked up a 1971 Witcomb with all campy stuff including campy bar end shifters. The cable housing on that bike is set up just like Mariano did it. Who the heck am I to argue with Mariano Basso . . .

Basso's bike
If I were doing it I'd do the Basso thing but with a double cross. First cross with the housing in front of the head tube and then cross the inners under the downtube.

This will work even better with modern housing.
Ronsonic is offline  
Old 04-03-21, 07:08 PM
  #10  
juvela
Senior Member
 
juvela's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Alta California
Posts: 10,712
Mentioned: 302 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2501 Post(s)
Liked 800 Times in 631 Posts
-----

mounting tip -

when you have everything mounted and adjusted the way you think you want it give the machine a test ride prior to bar wrapping

some riders discover that their knees can hit the ends of the shift levers when pedaling out of the saddle

if you find this symptom one solution is to trim the trail on the bar


-----
juvela is online now  
Old 04-03-21, 07:26 PM
  #11  
Cougrrcj 
Over forty victim of Fate
 
Cougrrcj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 3,732

Bikes: A few...

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 557 Post(s)
Liked 284 Times in 193 Posts
I've had by barcon shifter cables routed the 'traditional' way since the '70s. Never had a problem with the cable getting in the way of my fingers while riding in the drops. I DID try to route them exiting at the stem (with the original coiled stainless housing) and there was too much friction. Maybe if I used new slick stainless inner cables and Teflon-lined housing that wouldn't be an issue...










.
__________________
'75 Fuji S-10S bought new, 52k+ miles and still going!
'84 Univega Gran Tourismo
'84 Univega Viva Sport
'86 Miyata 710
'90 Schwinn Woodlands
Unknown brand MTB of questionable lineage aka 'Mutt Trail Bike'
Plus or minus a few others from time-to-time

Cougrrcj is offline  
Old 04-03-21, 08:00 PM
  #12  
Classtime 
Senior Member
 
Classtime's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 2,748

Bikes: 81 Medici, 2011 Richard Sachs, 2011 Milwaukee Road

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1035 Post(s)
Liked 422 Times in 296 Posts
Wrapping the cables a little ways up the bend (a tad more than the yellow Miyata above) let's me use the drops and brake without cables in the way and provides a really nice curve to the downtube bosses. Cable friction is always bad and should be reduced whenever practical.
__________________
I don't do: disks, tubeless, e-shifting, or bead head nymphs.
Classtime is offline  
Old 04-03-21, 08:21 PM
  #13  
clubman
Youngman Grand
 
clubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 7,338

Bikes: roadsters, club bikes, fixed and classic

Mentioned: 105 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1730 Post(s)
Liked 878 Times in 582 Posts
Traditional routing preferred here. I like wide bars and try to keep cable loops a little tighter. I have original housings saved for a project but standard stuff works better than well. Helps prevent paint wear marks on headtube.


clubman is offline  
Old 04-03-21, 08:48 PM
  #14  
gugie 
Dilberteur at large
 
gugie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 9,198

Bikes: It's complicated.

Mentioned: 1011 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3260 Post(s)
Liked 1,564 Times in 797 Posts
Originally Posted by The Golden Boy View Post
I've done it with the cables going out at the drop bend, I've done it with 'criss cross' cables so you have nicer arcs and I've done it under the wraps.

With modern cable and housing, there's really no reason to NOT do it all under the wraps- the friction difference is negligible. Unless you like the looks of the "traditional" ways.

Then again, if you're using a front rack and a rack bag- you really want it to go under the wraps since the cables will interfere with the bag.

Under the wraps (with aero levers)

IMG_0220 by Dave The Golden Boy, on Flickr


The arcs of the cables with the 'criss cross' cables- it's so much easier to get right- and it looks more pleasing to me.

CrissCrossCables by Dave The Golden Boy, on Flickr

CrissCrossFront by Dave The Golden Boy, on Flickr



To do that ^ you need to have the cables crossed at some other point- it's easiest under the downtube. Of course, this can be problematic if your cables don't go under the BB.

UnderDownTube by Dave The Golden Boy, on Flickr



I wish I would have taken some better, non-cluttered pix when I had the bike set up that way.
^^^this

The "cyclocross" gambit.
__________________
If someone tells you that you have enough bicycles and you don't need any more, stop talking to them. You don't need that kind of negativity in your life.
gugie is online now  
Old 04-03-21, 08:58 PM
  #15  
ramzilla
Senior Member
 
ramzilla's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Fernandina Beach FL
Posts: 3,486

Bikes: Vintage Japanese Bicycles, Tange, Ishiwata, Kuwahara

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 677 Post(s)
Liked 263 Times in 209 Posts
ramzilla is offline  
Old 04-03-21, 09:08 PM
  #16  
pcb 
Senior Member
 
pcb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Joisey
Posts: 1,446
Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 358 Post(s)
Liked 531 Times in 253 Posts
No real wrong way to do it. Std assembly protocol in the shop in the early '80s was an early exit, before the curve. I started running my own a little higher, finding the early exit routing kinda annoyingly floppy, especially with flexy stainless steel housing used back then, and it got in the way of bar bags. I've evolved to all the way to the top now, just find it cleaner, and I like the lines better. I do the criss-cross, but that only works with under-bb cable guides. Over-bb guides need the housing uncrossed.

Not so easy to see here, but the criss-crossed cables nestle right between the rear pockets on this Ostrich front bar bag. I really like how the criss-crossed housing frames the head tube.



__________________
Fuggedaboutit!
pcb is offline  
Likes For pcb:
Old 04-04-21, 01:52 AM
  #17  
styggno1
Steel is real
 
styggno1's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Posts: 907

Bikes: A lot - accumulated over +30 years

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 287 Post(s)
Liked 397 Times in 142 Posts
Yet another version - I have mine wrapped in all the way up and crossed but do not cross them back. I shift the front derailleur with my right hand and the rear with my left. I am ambidexter which might help.

styggno1 is offline  
Old 04-04-21, 08:07 AM
  #18  
xiaoman1 
Awaiting Parole
 
xiaoman1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Weird Coast City of the Angels
Posts: 4,028

Bikes: A few too many

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 925 Post(s)
Liked 897 Times in 562 Posts
I use the traditional way of routing the cables being sure that they are just long enough so no interference with turning or shifting. I never understand why some applications have so much extra cable.
Best, Ben
__________________
"STAND UP FOR WHAT IS RIGHT EVEN IF YOU ARE THE ONLY ONE STANDING"

xiaoman1 is offline  
Old 04-04-21, 03:05 PM
  #19  
rsacilotto
Senior Member
 
rsacilotto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Saugus, Massachusetts, United States
Posts: 221

Bikes: 1983 Trek 760, 2000 Fuji Team, 1988 Schwinn Voyageur

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked 10 Times in 4 Posts
I run mine all the way under the tape, shifting is not a problem, works great.


​​​​​​
rsacilotto is offline  
Old 04-05-21, 01:12 AM
  #20  
merziac
Senior Member
 
merziac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: PDX
Posts: 7,903

Bikes: Merz x 5 + Specialized Merz Allez x 2, Strawberry/Newlands/DiNucci/Ti x3, Gordon, Fuso/Moulton x2, Bornstein, Paisley,1958-74 Paramounts x3, 3rensho, 74 Moto TC, 73-78 Raleigh Pro's x5, Marinoni x2, 1960 Cinelli SC, 1980 Bianchi SC, PX-10 X 2

Mentioned: 159 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2378 Post(s)
Liked 1,586 Times in 1,069 Posts
My first exposure to them was on my first "good" bike that had them and the cables exited the tape at the brake levers.

I have always thought that this was the way to do it.





Mine was like this in baby blue, the earlier version.


merziac is online now  
Likes For merziac:
Old 04-05-21, 10:00 PM
  #21  
pcb 
Senior Member
 
pcb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Joisey
Posts: 1,446
Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 358 Post(s)
Liked 531 Times in 253 Posts
Does that sticker read Mizutani Super Seraph? Holy Japanese Obscurity, Batman!

Was there also a Regular Seraph, or a Seraph Standard, or a Minor Seraph? Or were they all Super?

I don't want to be ungracious to Japanese mechanics of yesteryear, or sour merziac's fond memories of that first good bike, but the high housing exit in the blue Super photo results in a suboptimal angle/bend where the housing meets the clamp. Not entirely elegant, or mechanically ideal.

Dame da to iitakakunai kedo, maaaa, mou hitotsu to iisuginai ka na? Don't wanna say it's wrong, but it kinda just ain't right...

Oh, also just noticed the way-too-long rear brake cable. Can't unsee that now.
__________________
Fuggedaboutit!
pcb is offline  
Likes For pcb:
Old 04-05-21, 10:19 PM
  #22  
arex
Abuse Magnet
 
arex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,719

Bikes: '91 Mtn Tek Vertical, '74 Raleigh Sports, '72 Raleigh Twenty, '84 Univega Gran Turismo, '09 Surly Karate Monkey, '92 Burley Rock-n-Roll

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 99 Post(s)
Liked 35 Times in 20 Posts
I've done three bikes with the bar-end cables under the tape, exiting at the stem. Doesn't seem to bind up or anything, and it's a lot cleaner.
arex is offline  
Old 04-05-21, 11:37 PM
  #23  
merziac
Senior Member
 
merziac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: PDX
Posts: 7,903

Bikes: Merz x 5 + Specialized Merz Allez x 2, Strawberry/Newlands/DiNucci/Ti x3, Gordon, Fuso/Moulton x2, Bornstein, Paisley,1958-74 Paramounts x3, 3rensho, 74 Moto TC, 73-78 Raleigh Pro's x5, Marinoni x2, 1960 Cinelli SC, 1980 Bianchi SC, PX-10 X 2

Mentioned: 159 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2378 Post(s)
Liked 1,586 Times in 1,069 Posts
Originally Posted by pcb View Post
Does that sticker read Mizutani Super Seraph? Holy Japanese Obscurity, Batman!

Was there also a Regular Seraph, or a Seraph Standard, or a Minor Seraph? Or were they all Super?

I don't want to be ungracious to Japanese mechanics of yesteryear, or sour merziac's fond memories of that first good bike, but the high housing exit in the blue Super photo results in a suboptimal angle/bend where the housing meets the clamp. Not entirely elegant, or mechanically ideal.

Dame da to iitakakunai kedo, maaaa, mou hitotsu to iisuginai ka na? Don't wanna say it's wrong, but it kinda just ain't right...

Oh, also just noticed the way-too-long rear brake cable. Can't unsee that now.
Looks like they were always in a hurry with the cables, no time to take a step back and see how its going.

As far as I know, they were a PNW thing, distributed by Life Cycles and sold from a chain of Life Cycles shops, East, West, Roth and a couple others, my first one a basic Seraph came from the East store, the Super came from Mel Renfro's bike shop.

Yep, Seraph, Spree and, you guessed it, Super. Funny thing, the awesome HB says Mizutani Super Seraph on all models so many that come up for sale get listed as "Super Seraph's". They were all heavy, my Super rode great as far as I new, despite that. I had the lever exit for the cables working great for me once I got it down after anchoring them with electrical tape to hold them in place before wrapping over them. Back then wrapping up to the stem wasn't a thing and like you, I didn't like them flopping around when only wrapped for the first few inches.
merziac is online now  
Old 04-06-21, 12:24 AM
  #24  
pcb 
Senior Member
 
pcb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Joisey
Posts: 1,446
Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 358 Post(s)
Liked 531 Times in 253 Posts
Mizutani was a trading company, yet another one of those scrappy companies that put together a bike line to feed the US bike boom.

My two favorites were looking to sign up dealers at the '80/'81 International Toy & Bicycle Shows at the Javits Center in NYC. One was, I kid you not, Karate Bicycle. The other was Oxjap Bicycle, short for Occident-Japan, but I always saw it as a rude way to address Japanese oxen.

We had kind of self-imposed trouble bringing in any of the other big Japanese brands, because the former owner was a bigwig at Fuji, and the shop was named Fuji Cycle Center. So we were always on the lookout for a good smaller brand that wouldn't bother Fuji and wouldn't bother the smaller brand being in a Fuji shop. We did not take on Karate or Oxjap, but we did bring in Matsuri, which is the Japanese word for "festival." Maruka Machinery owned the Matsuri brand, and the bikes were sourced from Nissan. Don't know who else Nissan might have been building for.

Originally Posted by merziac View Post
Looks like they were always in a hurry with the cables, no time to take a step back and see how its going.

As far as I know, they were a PNW thing, distributed by Life Cycles and sold from a chain of Life Cycles shops, East, West, Roth and a couple others, my first one a basic Seraph came from the East store, the Super came from Mel Renfro's bike shop.

Yep, Seraph, Spree and, you guessed it, Super. Funny thing, the awesome HB says Mizutani Super Seraph on all models so many that come up for sale get listed as "Super Seraph's". They were all heavy, my Super rode great as far as I new, despite that. I had the lever exit for the cables working great for me once I got it down after anchoring them with electrical tape to hold them in place before wrapping over them. Back then wrapping up to the stem wasn't a thing and like you, I didn't like them flopping around when only wrapped for the first few inches.
__________________
Fuggedaboutit!
pcb is offline  
Likes For pcb:
Old 04-06-21, 12:39 AM
  #25  
merziac
Senior Member
 
merziac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: PDX
Posts: 7,903

Bikes: Merz x 5 + Specialized Merz Allez x 2, Strawberry/Newlands/DiNucci/Ti x3, Gordon, Fuso/Moulton x2, Bornstein, Paisley,1958-74 Paramounts x3, 3rensho, 74 Moto TC, 73-78 Raleigh Pro's x5, Marinoni x2, 1960 Cinelli SC, 1980 Bianchi SC, PX-10 X 2

Mentioned: 159 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2378 Post(s)
Liked 1,586 Times in 1,069 Posts
Originally Posted by pcb View Post
Mizutani was a trading company, yet another one of those scrappy companies that put together a bike line to feed the US bike boom.

My two favorites were looking to sign up dealers at the '80/'81 International Toy & Bicycle Shows at the Javits Center in NYC. One was, I kid you not, Karate Bicycle. The other was Oxjap Bicycle, short for Occident-Japan, but I always saw it as a rude way to address Japanese oxen.

We had kind of self-imposed trouble bringing in any of the other big Japanese brands, because the former owner was a bigwig at Fuji, and the shop was named Fuji Cycle Center. So we were always on the lookout for a good smaller brand that wouldn't bother Fuji and wouldn't bother the smaller brand being in a Fuji shop. We did not take on Karate or Oxjap, but we did bring in Matsuri, which is the Japanese word for "festival." Maruka Machinery owned the Matsuri brand, and the bikes were sourced from Nissan. Don't know who else Nissan might have been building for.
So did Mizutani sell bikes anywhere else in the states? The first boat anchor Seraph came to me through a promotion with Coca-Cola, you could collect bottle caps and trade them for up to 1/2 of the cost of a new Seraph, I got the bottle caps from a gas station pop machine in record time and my Dad paid for the other half. I managed to get it stolen within about a year I think.
merziac is online now  
Likes For merziac:

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.