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Equipment/Product Review (1988) SCOTT Superbrake / MATHAUSER Hydraulic Brake

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Equipment/Product Review (1988) SCOTT Superbrake / MATHAUSER Hydraulic Brake

Old 04-16-21, 02:31 PM
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Equipment/Product Review (1988) SCOTT Superbrake / MATHAUSER Hydraulic Brake







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Old 04-16-21, 08:23 PM
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Interesting how hydraulic bicycle brakes with rubber brake pads were only taken on by just a couple of manufacturers (Mathauser and Magura) I guess the kinda odd interface between traditional rubber brake pads and more modern hydraulic actuators just never really made for "solid" engineering and it became sort of a technological dead end.....

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Old 04-17-21, 05:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Chombi1 View Post
Interesting how hydraulic bicycle brakes with rubber brake pads were only taken on by just a couple of manufacturers (Mathauser and Magura) I guess the kinda odd interface between traditional rubber brake pads and more modern hydraulic actuators just never really made for "solid" engineering and it became sort of a technological dead end.....
Thatís kind of a weird take on it, since pad material really doesnít matter to the caliper / wheel cylinder.

More likely, since hydraulic brakes require you to use a system-specific lever and Ďcaliperí ; these (Matthauser / Magura) arrived in the early 1990s which also saw the rise of Shimano STI integrated brake lever / shifter units. Speccing hydraulics would mean not getting those indexed Rapidfire shifters.
Iím willing to bet that if a mfgr chose to put STI /Rapidfire on a bike, Shimano would throw the brakes in for free. Guess which way they went?
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Old 04-17-21, 07:36 AM
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old pics, for reference









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Old 04-17-21, 07:39 AM
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more old pics, for reference










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Old 04-17-21, 01:15 PM
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a few shots of a Graftek equipped with the Scott Superbrakes, as well as a bunch of other trick gear, shown at one of the Classic Rendezvous gatherings...







Seems like a valid enough concept. The pivot appears robust and able to handle the forces. The proprietary brake shoe mounting technique might be an issue, though.

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Old 04-17-21, 03:49 PM
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What deficiency, what problem, are these attempting solve?

I came down a hill at 40 mph this afternoon. As I approached the bottom of the hill, I scooted back on the saddle, got down on the drops and applied the brakes. I stopped in 100 feet (approx.). The rear brake had to be modulated to prevent the rear wheel from skidding up - the front brake is VERY powerful, especially when pointed downhill.
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Old 04-18-21, 09:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Ironfish653 View Post
Thatís kind of a weird take on it, since pad material really doesnít matter to the caliper / wheel cylinder.

More likely, since hydraulic brakes require you to use a system-specific lever and Ďcaliperí ; these (Matthauser / Magura) arrived in the early 1990s which also saw the rise of Shimano STI integrated brake lever / shifter units. Speccing hydraulics would mean not getting those indexed Rapidfire shifters.
Iím willing to bet that if a mfgr chose to put STI /Rapidfire on a bike, Shimano would throw the brakes in for free. Guess which way they went?
Ever compare the durometer ratings between typical disc brake pads and traditional rubber brake pads? The interface between the more rigid hydraulic disc brake pads and brake disc makes more sense because of the non-compressibility of hydraulic fluid in hydraulicly activated brakes, definitely makes more sense from an engineering standpoint......
Yes, we are dealing with rim braking with the Magura and Mathauser systems, but they are kinda like a half baked solution to hydraulic braking which they should have just done with a disc (or even a drum) instead, to properly take advantage of the rigidity and feel you get from a hydraulic system.

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Old 04-18-21, 11:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Chombi1 View Post
Ever compare the durometer ratings between typical disc brake pads and traditional rubber brake pads? The interface between the more rigid hydraulic disc brake pads and brake disc makes more sense because of the non-compressibility of hydraulic fluid in hydraulicly activated brakes, definitely makes more sense from an engineering standpoint......
Yes, we are dealing with rim braking with the Magura and Mathauser systems, but they are kinda like a half baked solution to hydraulic braking which they should have just done with a disc (or even a drum) instead, to properly take advantage of the rigidity and feel you get from a hydraulic system.
Boy, BikeForums really likes to go down the rabbit hole.
Occamís razor; Itís cost; thatís why hydraulic rim brakes didnít really catch on.
Hydro rim brakes cost more, and prevent you from running those integrated Shimano shifters. Making a disc wheel in the late 80s-early 90s would have even been more suicidal. Youíve got to get mfgrs to build frames with disc caliper mounts, as well as design your own wheel hubs and rotors.
It wasnít until the Downhill MTB arms race of the mid 1990s that disc brakes really crossed over from motos to bicycles.

As far as rigidity and feel; Maguras have been a staple of observed trials, where you need massive brakes; at least until they were supplanted by modern disc brakes.

You cant really compare Ďdurometerí of the brake pads, because rim brakes use hard rubber pads on an aluminum brake track, and discs use sintered metal pads on a steel rotor.

Hydraulic rim brakes were always a niche product, though.
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