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1956 Crescent VM-racer, mod 201 (pre pepita)

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1956 Crescent VM-racer, mod 201 (pre pepita)

Old 06-05-21, 07:07 PM
  #26  
John E
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Great bike, but whazzup with Crescent and the Ashtabula cranks I see on so many of them?

Total bike weight is respectable, given the components.
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Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
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Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
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Old 06-06-21, 02:35 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by John E View Post
Great bike, but whazzup with Crescent and the Ashtabula cranks I see on so many of them?

Total bike weight is respectable, given the components.

Ashtabula being a place in the US where Fauber patent one piece cranks were made for Schwinn - I have heard?

The "Fauber" one piece forged steel cranks were being used in in Sweden from the dawn of "bicycle time" well into the 80ies . Its "career" changed over time. From being the strongest, lightest and most servicable crankset around to something to be looked down upon with disgust as the low end cheapest and ugliest.

To the story also belongs Swedens long history of high quality precision steel making and engineering. In the 40ies and 50ies these cranks were extremely well made over here. The steel was mangan alloyed and could withstand a 450 kg chock sideways without permanent damage. The Swedish bearingmaker SKF made the ball bearings and races to 0,001 mm standards. This was a good crank and up to par with anything - up until late 50ies when lighter products took over. The crankset was still strong and easily serviced though and the steel was still cheap - which made the crankset type live on - but on lesser and lesser model bikes until the 80ies.

The ones on these 40-50ies Crescent competiton bikes were made special and when dismantling my bike for a service I will try to show some differences compared to the standard ones.

Last edited by styggno1; 06-06-21 at 05:39 AM. Reason: Spelling
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Old 06-06-21, 05:43 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by styggno1 View Post
Ashtabula being a place in the US where Fauber patent one piece cranks were made for Schwinn - I have heard?

The "Fauber" one piece forged steel cranks were being used in in Sweden from the dawn of "bicycle time" well into the 80ies . Its "career" changed over time. From being the strongest, lightest and most servicable crankset around to something to be looked down upon with disgust as the low end cheapest and ugliest.

To the story also belongs Swedens long history of high quality precision steel making and engineering. In the 40ies and 50ies these cranks where extremely well made over here. The steel was mangan alloyed and could withstand a 450 kg chock sideways without permanent damage. The Swedish bearingmaker SKF made the ball bearings and races to 0,001 mm standards. This was a good crank and up to par with anything - up until late 50ies when lighter products took over. The crankset was still strong and easily serviced though and the steel was still cheap - which made the crankset type live on - but on lesser and lesser model bikes until the 80ies.

The ones on these 40-50ies Crescent competiton bikes where made special and when dismantling my bike for a service I will try to show some differences compared to the standard ones.
Thank you for the detailed explanation. Sweden did indeed have a strong reputation in metallurgy, back when SAAB and Volvo were recognized as among the most durable automobiles available.
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"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Carlton: 1962 Franco Suisse, S/N K7911
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
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Old 06-07-21, 12:18 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by styggno1 View Post
The tubes are an eclectic gathering of sizes. The seat and down tubes could be BSC at 28,85 both - with paint. But the top tube at 27,2 and headtube at 33,1 must be considered oversize compared to BSC. The BB shell is an old Scandinavian standard and large at 45,8 mm inner diameter. The Fabuer crankset - is using BB threads on this racer model. Pedals are 1/2. The pump peg has a mate in the other end of the downtube and can be seen in the "before" picture above. They are quite common on vintage Swedish bikes. Here is a close up.





It is actually easier than that - what looks like rust is a grease or oil residue. This is after I just rubbed the derailleur with my finger a little.



Without bottle holder, pump and toe clips it weighs in at:

KG


Pounds


Not bad considering a 60 cm frame, a Brooks B17 and a steel seatpost!
I had a hard time to get this JUY-51 derailleur working. In the end I went to local bike shop which is doing also some older bike service.
They needed to put one washer on the bottom of freewheel to get the freewheel closer so the adjustment of the derailleur will be enough. It worked fine with 5 speed (only 4 used) freewheel but I wanted to have 4 speed freewheel as it has been at the beginning. I ride today a few kilometers with it and it shifts gear as smooth as 70 years old part could shift.
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Old 06-07-21, 03:08 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by henu22 View Post
I had a hard time to get this JUY-51 derailleur working. In the end I went to local bike shop which is doing also some older bike service.
They needed to put one washer on the bottom of freewheel to get the freewheel closer so the adjustment of the derailleur will be enough. It worked fine with 5 speed (only 4 used) freewheel but I wanted to have 4 speed freewheel as it has been at the beginning. I ride today a few kilometers with it and it shifts gear as smooth as 70 years old part could shift.
There might be a lot of room for error with these derailleurs - the 51 and the TdF. One might think there are only one version - but have a look at these pictures and you will see there are versions for different chains and for 3,4 or 5 gears.

Juy 51


TdF


The last one showing the correct way for the chain thru - which is sort of counter intuitive when being used to set up more modern derailleurs.

Last edited by styggno1; 06-07-21 at 03:15 PM.
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Old 06-07-21, 03:50 PM
  #31  
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Thank you for the two Juy 51 diagrams!
It would appear that the top diagram is for a later version with the cage pivot between the pulleys, whereas the bottom diagram is for an earlier model with the cage pivot co axial (is this the correct term?) with the lower pulley.

I was able to modify a 4-gear version of the earlier model to accommodate 5 gears by drilling the hole in part number 838b a little deeper allowing part number 837b to travel a little farther inboard. I also stretched spring number 816 a bit, not a perfect modification but it shifts well enough.

Here are a couple more Juy 51 scans which another forum member shared with me:





Brent
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Old 06-08-21, 10:18 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by obrentharris View Post
Thank you for the two Juy 51 diagrams!
It would appear that the top diagram is for a later version with the cage pivot between the pulleys, whereas the bottom diagram is for an earlier model with the cage pivot co axial (is this the correct term?) with the lower pulley.

I was able to modify a 4-gear version of the earlier model to accommodate 5 gears by drilling the hole in part number 838b a little deeper allowing part number 837b to travel a little farther inboard. I also stretched spring number 816 a bit, not a perfect modification but it shifts well enough.

Here are a couple more Juy 51 scans which another forum member shared with me:





Brent
I used this same scan. As this manual says you could find type stamped on the side plate. Mine says 4 Vit. Chain 2,38, so that it is.
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Old 06-09-21, 02:44 PM
  #33  
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[QUOTE=henu22;22087476]Hello

But here it comes 3185046

Interesting Henu22 mentions his serial number as above; the Cresent 1953 listed on Steel Bikes had 3263305 (I believe) and the one i have, also told it was a 1953, has 3095820. All have no Letter prefix.
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Old 06-09-21, 10:37 PM
  #34  
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[QUOTE=madscrambler;22095166]
Originally Posted by henu22 View Post
Hello


But here it comes 3185046


Interesting Henu22 mentions his serial number as above; the Cresent 1953 listed on Steel Bikes had 3263305 (I believe) and the one i have, also told it was a 1953, has 3095820. All have no Letter prefix.

A couple of years ago I send an email to Crescent and asked that if they have the knowledge or if they knew someone who has about those serial numbers but never received any answer.

As styggno1 said that first number probably indicates the year, maybe next two could be month (just guessing as many other products are marked like that but I have no idea if this was the method already in the 50's) but then next two could not be date anymore because these numbers don't make any sense then. I also don't know how many cycles they produced in a year back then but I could guess it would be less than these days so the order number should be quite small if there is one. I could be totally wrong so someone smarter can freely correct these.
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Old 06-10-21, 07:15 AM
  #35  
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[QUOTE=henu22;22095735]
Originally Posted by madscrambler View Post


A couple of years ago I send an email to Crescent and asked that if they have the knowledge or if they knew someone who has about those serial numbers but never received any answer.

As styggno1 said that first number probably indicates the year, maybe next two could be month (just guessing as many other products are marked like that but I have no idea if this was the method already in the 50's) but then next two could not be date anymore because these numbers don't make any sense then. I also don't know how many cycles they produced in a year back then but I could guess it would be less than these days so the order number should be quite small if there is one. I could be totally wrong so someone smarter can freely correct these.
Sorry - but I did not say the first number probably indicates the year as you write above. What I did write was - "if it has this format (pic below (showing a serial starting with a capital "N")) the first number gives the year of manufacture. In this case it is 1956.

The serials with a format not starting with a "N" - I do not believe start with the year.
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Old 06-10-21, 07:27 AM
  #36  
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[QUOTE=styggno1;22095974]
Originally Posted by henu22 View Post

Sorry - but I did not say the first number probably indicates the year as you write above. What I did write was - "if it has this format (pic below (showing a serial starting with a capital "N")) the first number gives the year of manufacture. In this case it is 1956.

The serials with a format not starting with a "N" - I do not believe start with the year.
Yes sorry, my mistake. No I have 10 posts so Iím able to send pictures here.
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Old 06-10-21, 07:33 AM
  #37  
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So here is my bike

Serial number shown here

JUY-51 derailleur, not sure if itís original or not. Depends maybe the manufacturing year of the bike

Decal showing here

Lohmann saddle

Brakes, levers are Weinmann and maybe from 80ís
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