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Recommend a 28mm tire thats smooth riding

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Recommend a 28mm tire thats smooth riding

Old 04-29-21, 11:16 AM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by robertj298 View Post
Iíve read conflicting reports on these. Some people say the ride quality is any better than the Gatorskins
I've had 4 sets of Gatorskins (1 Hardshells) over the last 10 years and they are great tires. I'm a bigger guy at 235 and really like the Gatorskins. Still have 1 pair in the shed.

In the past 2 weeks I got my first 2 sets of GP5000'S. 32c on a fixed gear and 28c on a CAAD9. It is not even close as far as ride quality and rolling resistance. The GP's are much better. Though with less than a hundred miles on them, I am still very much in the "let's see what happens as far as durability goes" stage.

I too was a little concerned with some of the reviews regarding durability, but it has been worth the try.
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Old 04-29-21, 11:17 AM
  #27  
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I'll second or third or fifth the Continental GP 5000 tires. They run a true 28mm on my rims, whereas the GP4000sII they replaced were about 1.5mm-2mm wider than advertised on my rims.

It helps that you can run a 28mm tire at a lower pressure than a 25mm or 23mm, of course. A reasonable range for 28mm is 85-100 PSI, depending on your weight and geometry. Being able to ride a 28mm tire at 90 feels nice, compared to a 25 at 100+.
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Old 04-29-21, 11:25 AM
  #28  
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and the gp5000 are on a flash sale right now https://www.probikekit.com/brands/co...get_id=2376228
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Old 04-29-21, 11:27 AM
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After reading all of the great reviews for the Conti GP5000s on here, I decided to take a look at pricing...
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Old 04-29-21, 11:28 AM
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Originally Posted by squirtdad View Post
and the gp5000 are on a flash sale right now https://www.probikekit.com/brands/co...get_id=2376228
You almost had me...the 28s weren't part of the sale.

However... https://www.chainreactioncycles.com/.../rp-prod183076
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Old 04-29-21, 11:37 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by jdawginsc View Post
You almost had me...the 28s weren't part of the sale.

However... https://www.chainreactioncycles.com/.../rp-prod183076
and merlin for 28s also https://www.merlincycles.com/en-us/c...ir-129803.html
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Old 04-29-21, 02:28 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by RiddleOfSteel View Post
My friend @ctak loves his GP5000s and has many miles on them. I would certainly consider them. I've had a lot of good experience with Soma Supple Vitesse EX (extra wear tread thickness, same carcass as the lighter SL, EX is still light!) in the 33mm size and find they are around 29-30mm wide on "normal" vintage and semi-modern rims (Mavic MA2, CXPs, Open Pros all at 19-20mm external). Height is about 29mm as well.

Depending on your weight, you can experiment with pressures. This will really help. I'm just below 200 lb and have found, thanks to ctak's suggestion, that dropping front pressure to 65 psi (rear at ~75 psi) is a noticeable improvement over pressure at 70-73 psi. I don't know how the roads are for you there, but in Seattle, there's plenty of pavement breaks and general junkiness that it makes riding smaller tires not fun. Out on country roads is a lot better, but that's a bit of a drive.

I've spent many years with smaller tires and have only in the last month or two finally ridden on something properly large (48mm and 42mm, both 700C, both Soma SV EX tires), and that was a watershed moment. Both 42 and 48mm tires measure small by a couple of mm on the aforementioned "normal" rims, though I'd bump the internal rim width up to run the 48s. 42s measure 38.5mm wide and do extremely well on the CXP21 rims they're mounted to.
Yes, I'm a big fan of gp5000s for their overall durability and low rolling resistance. Decent puncture protection thanks to the high thread count, though Gatorskins are in another class in this regard. Over 2k combined miles so far (on 28s and 32s) and no flats, though plenty of little cuts in the soft casing (after every ride I inspect/remove glass bits). Over time both of my sets have stretched approx 1mm in width.

Long term review that might interest some: https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...endurance-test
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Old 04-29-21, 02:41 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by jdawginsc View Post
After reading all of the great reviews for the Conti GP5000s on here, I decided to take a look at pricing...
Don't know if you think ~$40 a tire is a too princely a sum or not, but to get good tires, you have to pay good money (most of the time). Works for components as well. $80-90 for tires is another story, or at least that's my mark (Compass/Rene Herse stuff) for "not worth it." Tires can really make or break an overall ride experience and how the bike feels. Since I care about not having a crappy-feeling bike, and have felt the differences between many, I pay attention to tire type and spec. If you or other people don't care or can't perceive a difference between cheap and expensive, then you get to save some money, so more power to you.
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Old 04-29-21, 03:01 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by noobinsf View Post
If you don't mind blackwall tires, I have heard good things about Soma Supple Vitesse, and they are on sale here for $30 each:

https://www.somafabshop.com/shop/pro...&category=2790

I have a pair of 33mm that I have yet to install, so I don't yet have first-hand experience.
I know it's not the 28 that I can review, but I got a set of the 33s in the SL variety (black wasn't what I wanted but it works). Mounted them with latex tubes and it's a really nice ride. Like, really really nice. Feel planted to the road, absorb the chipseal and cracks around here very well. Took them on a longer twisty descent few weeks back and they handled it great. I run them around 60-65 psi. Plan to try and do a back to back comparison to my ReneHerse 650x38b LLPs when that bike is back together.
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Old 04-29-21, 03:09 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by RiddleOfSteel View Post
Don't know if you think ~$40 a tire is a too princely a sum or not, but to get good tires, you have to pay good money (most of the time). Works for components as well. $80-90 for tires is another story, or at least that's my mark (Compass/Rene Herse stuff) for "not worth it." Tires can really make or break an overall ride experience and how the bike feels. Since I care about not having a crappy-feeling bike, and have felt the differences between many, I pay attention to tire type and spec. If you or other people don't care or can't perceive a difference between cheap and expensive, then you get to save some money, so more power to you.
Not really too bad at $40...I saw another site that had them at $60...$40 is sort of my top area because I really like the Rubinos/Zaffiros on the road. Weirdly, not a big fan of gatorskins, but liked the Ultra Sports (2s maybe) but maybe when I get back to building a few of my own projects, I might take a flyer on the 5000s.

I have bought $60 + Michelins and Hutchinsons upon recommendation and they were poopy...

I am wondering about Michelin Country Rock 26s and Vittoria Pave CGs. And if I start widening the tires, I will probably look at other options.
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Old 04-29-21, 05:44 PM
  #36  
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Another good black wall tire is the Michelin Pro4 Service Course. They only come in 23 and 25, but the 25ís I had measured more like 27-28.
https://www.biketiresdirect.com/prod...SABEgKTw_D_BwE
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Old 05-03-21, 11:23 AM
  #37  
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Panaracer Pasela

Black wall or gum wall. Good value, and absolutely no snob appeal at all. They come in 23c all the way up to 38 I believe.
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Old 05-03-21, 11:26 AM
  #38  
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Smooth Riding 28's

Smooth riding, puncture resistance, mileage, Cost.
Any decision will need to balance these factors.
Smooth riding usually means a higher tpi and moving to lower pressures on the larger volume tire.
My experience in replacement tires from the OEM supplied includes the following..
VIttoria Rubino tech 28 - a great improvement over 23 on my road bike.
On my Marinoni classic I started with Challenge Pro Strada 25 (limitation with chain stay) - high tpi and a great ride and durable.
(since upgraded to Veloflex Master 25 - Fantastic although would like to squeeze in the 28.
For this bike I also have a tubular wheelset with Veloflex Vaalandren 27 - Fantastic tire and durable when I used them on a gravel ride.

For a great ride smaller tires requires more tpi in my experience but as volume increases 32/35/40 you can drop pressure and get a smoother ride.
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Old 05-03-21, 11:36 AM
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Univega Super Strata

Originally Posted by robertj298 View Post
Out of my 4 bikes that I ride the most I believe only 2 will take a 28mm tire. My 83 Univega Super Strada and 84 Fuji Team are out. They barely take a 25 mm tire
I put a 28mm gatorskin on my 86 Panasonic DX 5000 and it rides great. I'm pretty sure my 87 Ironman Expert will take a 28mm tire but I'm wondering if there's a
better option than Gatorskins that aren't overly expensive?
83 Super Strada! Love to have one of those. I have a 86 Univega Gran Rally.
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Old 05-03-21, 11:40 AM
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Reliable and smooth rides on 28MM

I have been riding my Stelbel for 36 years now and have always used 28mm because I live in NYC and you never know what you may come across while riding on the pavement. My time on the Paselas over a few years were supple and great probably because of the soft side walls, and most recently rode on Vittoria Zafiro's which have side walls that are more stiff. I like the 105 PSI pressure on the Zafiro while the Pasela's are 95 PSI so a bit more forgiving. There are expensive tires out there for sure but the reliability I experienced is surely great for the money in addition to the smooth ride, rubber to the pavement is the only noise I want to hear which is not much which make the ride enjoyable. Waiting for Continental Ultra Sport lll's at the moment so I hope they will do the job, the testing noted they roll quite well. Time will tell...
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Old 05-03-21, 11:56 AM
  #41  
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I found some GP5000 tires on sale in 32mm so I rode them all last season on my old Peugeot with a Velocity wheelset built locally. I find that they ride rather harshly, not unlike Gatorskins even at 32mm. They'll stay on that wheelset until they're worn out, but I don't think I'll spend on them again.

I run Panaracer folding Paselas on my touring bike, and they're really quite excellent - comfy, quick feeling, tougher than the regular Paselas. I can't say enough good things about Panaracer tires. The quality is there at a reasonable price point IMO, especially compared with the GP5000 tires.

I just want to add that I love a good tire thread.

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Old 05-03-21, 01:01 PM
  #42  
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Pirelli P-Zero Velo. Nicest tires Iíve ever ridden. Supple, quiet, fast, grippy, tan. I know theyíre not vintage but I was blown away by the quality. $50 in 700x28

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Old 05-03-21, 01:31 PM
  #43  
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Gator Skins are well respected tires at a decent price. You don't say why you are you considering changing tires ( better comfort? improved rolling resistance? better durability? etc. . . ).So it is hard to make a recommendation, for your specific priorities.

If you are looking to try a new model/brand, why not just pick up one pair of 25's ( or 28’s) and see how they fit each of your bikes and go from there?

My 2 cents? For training or regular day-to-day riding, CONTINENTAL GP5000 clinchers, with latex tubes installed, run nice and smooth, are plenty grippy in the corners, have excellent rolling resistance, and offer good durability. These are some of the reasons many reviewers consider them to be the best all-rounder tire for most of us mere mortals. They are not the absolute fastest, grippiest, most durable, most comfortable, or the cheapest, but they do offer a very good overall combination of these features at a good price point.

A few things to keep in mind:
Reviewers report Continental 5000’s run true to size, but that, in my experience, depends entirely on the width of your rims and your preferred inflation pressure. On my Zonda rims with a 17mm inside width and 22 mm outside width they run a tad narrower than their spec. New 28’s at 100 psi mic’d in at 26.5mm (vs the GP 4000’s in a 25mm tire that mic’d in at a whopping 27.2mm width on the same rim at the same pressure). GP 5000 - 32’s at 80 psi mic'd in at 30mm. This in not a criticism, just a difference to be aware of. Your experience will probably vary, depending on your rim width and preferred running pressure.

On one of my 1987 Bianchi’s I can easily fit the GP 5000 32mm tires, but on another from the same era, I can only get a 28mm to fit, allowing for at least 3 mm clearances all round on the rear tire. Hence my suggestion to buy one pair and try them on each of your bikes.

Some report that the GP5000 - 25mm tires produce a harsher ride than the GP4000’s in a 25 mm tire. However, this is probably down to the fact that the 4000’s ran much wider than their sidewall suggested and therefore more comfortably. I see no difference between the comfort of the old GP4000iis in a 25mm and the new GP5000 in a 28mm tire. I compare these because when mounted and inflated, they come in at approximately the same width, <0.7mm difference.

Running latex tubes also smooths out the ride on virtually any tire you might ultimately select.

Overall, I would add my vote for the GP5000 clinchers as the no-brainer, all-rounder, for most of us, most of the time.

Good luck with your selection!

Last edited by gofish44; 05-03-21 at 01:37 PM.
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Old 05-03-21, 02:53 PM
  #44  
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I just installed a set of Michelain Dynamics on a recently completed restoration. 700c x 28mm but I have not tested them yet. Perhaps tomorrow if time permits...
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Old 05-03-21, 04:07 PM
  #45  
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I had put a pair of Vittoria Rubino Pro Tech-IIIs (since discontinued) on my '86 Miyata 710 - the rear fit fine, but the front left less than a mm to the bottom of the fork bridge. To give the tire more clearance, I was forced to not bottom out the axle in the dropout.



I later put on the same tire in 25mm on the front. Much better clearance now.

The Rubino Pros are 150tpi, so they are very supple, and the ride is very nice (I run them 80-85f / 90-95r psi) They also seem to wear well.

< Edit > edit to add my weight. I'm right around 200 pounds, and bike is 22.5 with a new lighter wheelset. I wanted 28mm to help absorb the rumble of the rough pavement surface out in AZ. Not cracked or potholed, but the actual road surface on most roads is what I call 'pebblestone' because the binder in the asphalt tends to 'go away' due to the summer desert heat, leaving the pebble surface with the pebbles being the size of peas/beans. Think 'cobblestone' with smaller stone.

Now that I've brought the bike back to the Midwest, we have rough roads due to frost heave, and much of my commute is not even on asphalt but rather on chip-seal roads. That's why I want to leave a 28 on the rear!!!
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Old 05-03-21, 04:11 PM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by gofish44 View Post
Gator Skins are well respected tires at a decent price. You don't say why you are you considering changing tires ( better comfort? improved rolling resistance? better durability? etc. . . ).So it is hard to make a recommendation, for your specific priorities.

If you are looking to try a new model/brand, why not just pick up one pair of 25's ( or 28ís) and see how they fit each of your bikes and go from there?

My 2 cents? For training or regular day-to-day riding, CONTINENTAL GP5000 clinchers, with latex tubes installed, run nice and smooth, are plenty grippy in the corners, have excellent rolling resistance, and offer good durability. These are some of the reasons many reviewers consider them to be the best all-rounder tire for most of us mere mortals. They are not the absolute fastest, grippiest, most durable, most comfortable, or the cheapest, but they do offer a very good overall combination of these features at a good price point.

A few things to keep in mind:
Reviewers report Continental 5000ís run true to size, but that, in my experience, depends entirely on the width of your rims and your preferred inflation pressure. On my Zonda rims with a 17mm inside width and 22 mm outside width they run a tad narrower than their spec. New 28ís at 100 psi micíd in at 26.5mm (vs the GP 4000ís in a 25mm tire that micíd in at a whopping 27.2mm width on the same rim at the same pressure). GP 5000 - 32ís at 80 psi mic'd in at 30mm. This in not a criticism, just a difference to be aware of. Your experience will probably vary, depending on your rim width and preferred running pressure.

On one of my 1987 Bianchiís I can easily fit the GP 5000 32mm tires, but on another from the same era, I can only get a 28mm to fit, allowing for at least 3 mm clearances all round on the rear tire. Hence my suggestion to buy one pair and try them on each of your bikes.

Some report that the GP5000 - 25mm tires produce a harsher ride than the GP4000ís in a 25 mm tire. However, this is probably down to the fact that the 4000ís ran much wider than their sidewall suggested and therefore more comfortably. I see no difference between the comfort of the old GP4000iis in a 25mm and the new GP5000 in a 28mm tire. I compare these because when mounted and inflated, they come in at approximately the same width, <0.7mm difference.

Running latex tubes also smooths out the ride on virtually any tire you might ultimately select.

Overall, I would add my vote for the GP5000 clinchers as the no-brainer, all-rounder, for most of us, most of the time.

Good luck with your selection!
Looking for more comfort
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Old 05-03-21, 06:32 PM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by Wildwood View Post
Unless they have changed Gatorskins from years ago = one of the hardest riding tire I have experienced. Maybe it is more flat proof but the sacrifice in ride quality used to be huge. IMHO.

Two rides on the Wolfpack clincher tire has me liking that one for a 23.5mm tire billed as being durable. On sale for $30 @ 1/2 price.
Yes. Maybe if you are in an area with tons of flats they may have some redeeming qualities in that regard. Otherwise they're the worst riding tire I've ever used and I've used quite a few. I am a continental gp5000/vittoria corsa g 2.0 fanboy.
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Old 05-03-21, 07:43 PM
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I have had great experiences with Conti GP4000SII and GP5000 in 28mm for unloaded riding. Both have been wonderful riding with great grip in the damp and low rolling resistance, and were/are also durable, and I am a heavier rider. The GP4000SII in 28 though did hit 30mm but that was fixed with the GP5000 which were true to size on the same Alexrims A23 rims.

However that said, my first choice in 28mm tires, especially if on a vintage bike will always be the Rene Herse Chinook Pass standard casing with the tan sidewall. They are true to size and to me felt even better than the Contis, however they are not cheap. I have not had any flats with any of those tires, but all the riding has been on road or relatively smooth unimproved surfaces.

I do want to try the Challenge tires. Tires are the one thing (other than a good seat) that I have found to make the greatest difference in feel on a bike, so I do not mind paying more (just like UHP car tires).
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Old 05-03-21, 11:07 PM
  #49  
Bad Lag
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Define your budget.

These cost $68.



These are also available in that price range. I am riding on these right now. Awesome tire - as close to a tubular as possible in a clincher.

I took a tight, downhill, off-camber turn yesterday at 30 mph, almost a 180 degree turn. It was superb!


Last edited by Bad Lag; 05-03-21 at 11:30 PM.
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Old 05-04-21, 05:59 AM
  #50  
nlerner
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+1 for those Challenge tires. I have found they measure between 27-29mm depending on the rim. They can also be a challenge to mount.
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