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Clunker 100 Challenge COVID 2.0 edition #7

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Clunker 100 Challenge COVID 2.0 edition #7

Old 06-01-21, 08:43 AM
  #351  
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With the build complete minus the front derailleur, the test ride was ready. First though the pump umbrella and the cable clamp guides to go along with the geometry leads to an awkward position of hand when carrying, so I have to be careful with my "trick wrist".

The first impression, even though the saddle is jacked the bike gives a feeling of upright, compared to bikes of the middle late 80's, that's good. I attribute that to fork clearance, a high and short stem. My PR10-L has very steep angles seat tube of 74'-75' and a steeper headtube. With those angles and a 23"/58.5mm toptube I slammed the very very soft saddle all the way back on the rails.

So on the bike I feel upright, like the Lion yoga position, with the sharp angle of the headtube I expected the Peugeot to be twitchy. I was wrong, don't get me wrong it steers very quick but the wheel base tames the savage beast. It feels like riding a dart, this thing rides straight, so I try the hands free. I release my grip, to my pleasure there is no dive to a side, I didn't have to get funky with my balance to maintain.

I'm two blocks into the ride, my first shift with a plastic Simplex rear derailleur in 35+ years. Yippie! It shifts, that was the same feeling I had back then (that bike was a Falcon). I proceed to take the first hill, it has big gears , and coast on down. I shift to higher gear, my new chain from the KHS is working very well with the Suntour Perfect 14-30 freewheel.

The brakes get their first test, the front is spongy, the back works great! The back brakes screams get outa way, a, a real attention getter. I get to the second hill, about 3 miles in the test, I shift to gear #2 and climb a medium grade hill, things are great! Then came the rain, all is well, it passes. I continue to a very scenic road. I have no front derailleur so I do a suicide shift, hand shift to the big ring. I get to the area where open up my speed and I noticed the front end getting squirrelly, yep first ride, first flat. I end up walking home 2 miles of an 8 mile spin.

ah dang!

Details






My pedals are a Green Manilisha

Last edited by Mr. 66; 06-01-21 at 08:48 AM.
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Old 06-01-21, 09:34 AM
  #352  
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I say the 2 miles counts toward the goal...

Suicide shift...good thing no burrs on the chain...


Originally Posted by Mr. 66

With the build complete minus the front derailleur, the test ride was ready. First though the pump umbrella and the cable clamp guides to go along with the geometry leads to an awkward position of hand when carrying, so I have to be careful with my "trick wrist".

The first impression, even though the saddle is jacked the bike gives a feeling of upright, compared to bikes of the middle late 80's, that's good. I attribute that to fork clearance, a high and short stem. My PR10-L has very steep angles seat tube of 74'-75' and a steeper headtube. With those angles and a 23"/58.5mm toptube I slammed the very very soft saddle all the way back on the rails.

So on the bike I feel upright, like the Lion yoga position, with the sharp angle of the headtube I expected the Peugeot to be twitchy. I was wrong, don't get me wrong it steers very quick but the wheel base tames the savage beast. It feels like riding a dart, this thing rides straight, so I try the hands free. I release my grip, to my pleasure there is no dive to a side, I didn't have to get funky with my balance to maintain.

I'm two blocks into the ride, my first shift with a plastic Simplex rear derailleur in 35+ years. Yippie! It shifts, that was the same feeling I had back then (that bike was a Falcon). I proceed to take the first hill, it has big gears , and coast on down. I shift to higher gear, my new chain from the KHS is working very well with the Suntour Perfect 14-30 freewheel.

The brakes get their first test, the front is spongy, the back works great! The back brakes screams get outa way, a, a real attention getter. I get to the second hill, about 3 miles in the test, I shift to gear #2 and climb a medium grade hill, things are great! Then came the rain, all is well, it passes. I continue to a very scenic road. I have no front derailleur so I do a suicide shift, hand shift to the big ring. I get to the area where open up my speed and I noticed the front end getting squirrelly, yep first ride, first flat. I end up walking home 2 miles of an 8 mile spin.

ah dang!

Details






My pedals are a Green Manilisha
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Old 06-01-21, 09:58 AM
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Trying to remember my Dancing Chain - wasn't the classical trick to carry a short metal rod with a hooked end in your jersey pocket? Use to hook to help shift up, just use it like a metal finger for downshifts?

Last edited by rustystrings61; 06-16-21 at 08:03 AM.
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Old 06-01-21, 10:10 AM
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Originally Posted by rustystrings61
Trying to remember my Dancing Chain - wasn’t the classical trick to carry a short metal rod with a hooked end in your jersey pocket? Use to hook to help shift up, just use it like a metal finger for downshifts?
Metal tire lever...? The full extent of my past stupidity was hands on tires if I thought I picked up glass, and pull on the cables for a shift, and one time to unstick a brake...
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Old 06-01-21, 10:13 AM
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Metal tire lever might actually work - a more sharply bent hook might work better for chain pickup, unless one gets skillful with the little hooky-slot meant to lock into a spoke... I may experiment with that some time just out of cussedness.

Or we can look expectantly at Mr 66 ...
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Old 06-01-21, 11:52 AM
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Originally Posted by jdawginsc
Health first, Clunker second! Best wishes to Ms. Non-fixie
Originally Posted by tyler_fred
Best wishes to Mrs NF for a speedy recovery.
Originally Posted by hazetguy
I'll be thinking good thoughts for Ms. Non-Fixie. Back pain can really suck.
Thank you, guys, on behalf of mrs non-fixie! And I am sure they helped, as things are really getting better quickly, and the past couple of days the old gal has been back on a bike, albeit for a couple of short-ish rides, and still medicated.

Now I have to get her to ride that crusty France-Sport for at least 100k ...
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Old 06-01-21, 12:32 PM
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The past week of the project has been almost exactly like watching paint dry for me. I've done a bit of clean up on the wheels...more rust removal, pulled the axles for degreasing. The bearings had surprisingly good grease. The bike was obviously overhauled shortly before its 10 years of sitting out in the rain.

I've had the chain soaking in EvapoRust for about two weeks. I pulled it out a couple of times this weekend for a good scrubbing with a wire brush. I think it may actually get to the point where it will look decent. As I think I mentioned earlier, it's a modern KMC Z-series chain. It was probably recently installed just before the bike was abandoned to the elements. I don't really think it'll loosen up enough to be useable. Even though it looks mostly rust-free now, there are still a lot of very stiff links. I sprayed it with PB Blaster and now it's soaking in oil. I've already got a new chain waiting to go on, but I kind of want to test the limits of what's possible since I have to give the paint time to dry anyway.

One of the things I wasn't expecting from the second year of COVID-19 is the poor state of the local bike non-profits. Usually you can stop by a pick up things like used tires, sometimes even wheels, for cheap. This weekend one of them was closed completely (they're open one night a week for "curbside service") and the other had only a single 27" tire, and it was new and knobby, but they did have a bin with some old top tube cable guides. I scored one generic Shimano guide, one Dura-Ace, and one Huret for a dollar a piece.

For some reason I was certain that the bike's original wheels took 700c tires, but as I was looking at one of them I saw that the rim tape was labeled with a size.



That seemed like nonsense (or, at least, I wanted it to be), so I grabbed a 700c tire for a test fit. It was too small. Yep, the wheels take 27" tires. I can live with that.

The budget so far is looking like this:

Initial bike investment: $0
Paint: $7.50 (half a can of primer and a can of color)
Decals: $9
Chain: $9
Tires: $32!! (had to order new ones, but I was able to get free shipping)
Dropout screws: $1
Cable guides: $3

So, $61.50 spent so far.

I'm almost certainly going to need a replacement freewheel, as the original part isn't freewheeling despite weeks of repeated assaults with oil and vinegar (the latter of which took off the gold flake when it was done with the rust) and PB Blaster. That'll add another $20 to my budget. I've got a good stock of bulk cables and housing, so I should be able to keep that under $10. I was able to salvage all of the non-consumable components (minus the saddle, which I chronicled earlier), though the arm of the front brake seems to be bent. If I dip into my store of used bar tape, I should be able to finish it off with around $10 to spare. Maybe I'll spend that on new brake pads.
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Old 06-01-21, 01:58 PM
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Well, I got mrs non-fixie to do a trial fit and short ride around the block on the France-Sport. 780m, according to Strava. 99.220m to go.

I am not unhappy. The bike fits, brakes, shifts, and complaints were within acceptable limits. To me anyway. I may have to replace the cheap saddle along the way.

So far I have calculated costs at close to $75, so there is some wiggle room, maybe for a blown tire, or even a very cheap leather saddle.


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Old 06-01-21, 02:07 PM
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At least you HaVE a non profit...we don’t have any. Well, I am sort of a non-profit with all of the money I laid out for student fixer uppers for the giveaway.

at least this challenge is keeping me from going crazy like I did with some of the kids bikes!

Originally Posted by Andy_K
The past week of the project has been almost exactly like watching paint dry for me. I've done a bit of clean up on the wheels...more rust removal, pulled the axles for degreasing. The bearings had surprisingly good grease. The bike was obviously overhauled shortly before its 10 years of sitting out in the rain.

I've had the chain soaking in EvapoRust for about two weeks. I pulled it out a couple of times this weekend for a good scrubbing with a wire brush. I think it may actually get to the point where it will look decent. As I think I mentioned earlier, it's a modern KMC Z-series chain. It was probably recently installed just before the bike was abandoned to the elements. I don't really think it'll loosen up enough to be useable. Even though it looks mostly rust-free now, there are still a lot of very stiff links. I sprayed it with PB Blaster and now it's soaking in oil. I've already got a new chain waiting to go on, but I kind of want to test the limits of what's possible since I have to give the paint time to dry anyway.

One of the things I wasn't expecting from the second year of COVID-19 is the poor state of the local bike non-profits. Usually you can stop by a pick up things like used tires, sometimes even wheels, for cheap. This weekend one of them was closed completely (they're open one night a week for "curbside service") and the other had only a single 27" tire, and it was new and knobby, but they did have a bin with some old top tube cable guides. I scored one generic Shimano guide, one Dura-Ace, and one Huret for a dollar a piece.

For some reason I was certain that the bike's original wheels took 700c tires, but as I was looking at one of them I saw that the rim tape was labeled with a size.



That seemed like nonsense (or, at least, I wanted it to be), so I grabbed a 700c tire for a test fit. It was too small. Yep, the wheels take 27" tires. I can live with that.

The budget so far is looking like this:

Initial bike investment: $0
Paint: $7.50 (half a can of primer and a can of color)
Decals: $9
Chain: $9
Tires: $32!! (had to order new ones, but I was able to get free shipping)
Dropout screws: $1
Cable guides: $3

So, $61.50 spent so far.

I'm almost certainly going to need a replacement freewheel, as the original part isn't freewheeling despite weeks of repeated assaults with oil and vinegar (the latter of which took off the gold flake when it was done with the rust) and PB Blaster. That'll add another $20 to my budget. I've got a good stock of bulk cables and housing, so I should be able to keep that under $10. I was able to salvage all of the non-consumable components (minus the saddle, which I chronicled earlier), though the arm of the front brake seems to be bent. If I dip into my store of used bar tape, I should be able to finish it off with around $10 to spare. Maybe I'll spend that on new brake pads.
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Old 06-02-21, 09:44 AM
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The second ride on the PR10-L felt great as well as the first. This time I reversed my circuit for stepper hill climbing. All was fine, but I got to the top of the last climb and the rear wheel was low, I walked about 3/4 miles home. Double dang it!!

So I fixed the flat, and I decided amp up the details and pantograph much of the engraved areas. The cranks, the brake levers, the calipers, straddles, and the front derailleur. That all worked out pretty good, well sorta good lol.

The panto done I went on the attack, me versus Simplex. The first round went to Simplex, it was frozen. My counter was to remove. My next move was to douse with WD-40, and push/pull tug of war, sweet I got it to move 1mm. Nice! I win the second round! The third round starts in back and forth the 1mm and another breakthrough moment, I got the full pull! Oh course it was stuck in the full pull, but the range was there!! So I'm bathed in WD and going toe toe with Simplex, Ali and Fraser, I beat Simplex again!!! Full action Unbroken Simplex. I am riding high hog heaven, oh yeah!

So riding high on French enthusiasm re-installed, very carefully and I check the settings the low is fine as is, I pull to check the up limit and that's not enough. It just had to happen, (it is French and as French goes), thegosh darn cage is rusted to the shaft and the cage needs to moved 3mm for full range. Simplex wins

Simplex calls for battle, I accept! I name it the Rumble in the Jungle 2021. Challenger Mr. 66 vs World Champion Simplex FD.

Here are some pictures



Fossilized Green Manilisha


Not all the pantograph was perfect, I do have a funny on that, I will post.

Last edited by Mr. 66; 06-02-21 at 11:15 AM.
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Old 06-02-21, 11:11 AM
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A fleeting idea to move the cage.


Now this is getting closer.

The chain remover is near the size. The one above may work if I grind the stops and a little more to center the pin to the shaft. I'll look for an alternative for now, that's still a good chain tool.
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Old 06-02-21, 11:38 AM
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Another day, another 32 kilometers down! That brings my total up to 81km. For the life of me I can't get this saddle at a comfortable angle, and I believe I've tried them all! I had to stop for a pic here, and I asked the owner for the go ahead. He said it has no battery but still runs. From one clunker to another, I tip my hat.


A mileage shot - note the rain drops. I got poured on at the tail end of the ride.

Last edited by BFisher; 06-02-21 at 11:50 AM.
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Old 06-02-21, 05:03 PM
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Is a 1998 Trek 730 old enough to count as "C&V"? I had no plans to participate in this event, but when this showed up on Craigslist for $40 I couldn't resist buying, and am thinking it would make a fun entry:

I've already replaced the seatpost ($8 at the local Bike Kitchen) and seat (parts bin, free from a friend - count as $10?), and spent another $2 today for a longer bolt to fix one of the brakes, plus a new rim strip ($4) and tube ($6) for the rear wheel. I think - but could still find out I'm mistaken - that it will be rideable after cleaning, lube and reassembly. Might need new cables and housing. What would you all recommend as good uses of another $30-40? New tires? (I have a set that came new on my gravel bike and I found them too buzzy, but they'd probably be good for this bike.)
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Old 06-02-21, 05:13 PM
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I've long suspected that EvapoRust involved some sort of dark magic beyond chemistry. I feel like I now have definitive proof. Check out this chain.

Before


After


Note that the "before" image shows the chain sprawling rather than neatly rolled. That's because most of the links wouldn't move. I said yesterday that I didn't think I'd be able to get this to the point of usability, but now I'm not so sure. I won't use it because the cheap Vuelta replacement I bought is shiny, but I think I could.

The "after" pic is the result of about two weeks of soaking in EvapoRust, with a couple of scrubbings with a wire brush on the last two days, followed by a day soaking in vinegar (because I needed the EvapoRust spa for something else). The vinegar didn't improve the appearance at all, but I think it dissolved some of the gunk inside the links because the chain is moving better now than it had been.
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Old 06-02-21, 05:32 PM
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When I first started tinkering with bikes at age 14 or so, we’d just leave chains in a container of motor oil for a few days. Did wonders to free up stiff links.
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Old 06-02-21, 05:32 PM
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@Mr. 66, that PR10 is classy and the saddle transformation was impressive.

I spent more time detailing the Follis. Touched up some places I missed, then had an "Aha" moment when I realized my Navajo White paint was a perfect match for those remnants of plastic still on the cable sheathing. I could (sort of) improve the look of those rusty metal coils where the plastic had fallen off. So like @andy k, I was watching paint dry for a while, then did a few neighborhood rides to perfect the bar angle and saddle height. Also added some scraps of cork bar tape near the hoods for comfort. Today I headed out on a 6 mile round trip to our local Bi-Mart. Follis has a nice ride, no problems with the bike, but my neck was killing me by time I got home. Seems I can't ride a bike with drop bars at the moment. Like Dirty Harry said, "Man's got to know his limitations", so I'm going to suspend my Clunker rides for now. Still lots of time to do 100 km. I have a Fisher Hoo Koo E Koo with North Road bars that should keep me fit while I vicariously follow the Clunker narrative. Hopefully I can resume in July. Don

Before

After Touch Up

Finished Clunker

87/88 Hoo Koo E Koo Place Holder

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Old 06-02-21, 05:55 PM
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@Mr. 66 "So riding high on French enthusiasm"
I have also experienced this effect while working on my French bikes. Could it be the side effect of a good CABERNET? Don

Last edited by ollo_ollo; 06-02-21 at 05:56 PM. Reason: grammar
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Old 06-02-21, 07:03 PM
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Originally Posted by nlerner
When I first started tinkering with bikes at age 14 or so, we’d just leave chains in a container of motor oil for a few days. Did wonders to free up stiff links.
I've got it in corn oil right now. That's pretty similar, right?
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Old 06-02-21, 07:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Andy_K
I've got it in corn oil right now. That's pretty similar, right?
Nice job on that chain. How can you not use it? Think of how great it will smell once that corn oil heats up.

I'm actually shocked at how smooth the crusty old Sedis on my clunker has been. After the vinegar bath, rinse, and wire wheel I soaked it with tri-flow. Not a squeak.
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Old 06-02-21, 07:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Andy_K
I've got it in corn oil right now. That's pretty similar, right?
As long as a deep fryer is involved, you're good.
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Old 06-02-21, 08:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Andy_K
I've long suspected that EvapoRust involved some sort of dark magic beyond chemistry. I feel like I now have definitive proof. Check out this chain.

Before


After


Note that the "before" image shows the chain sprawling rather than neatly rolled. That's because most of the links wouldn't move. I said yesterday that I didn't think I'd be able to get this to the point of usability, but now I'm not so sure. I won't use it because the cheap Vuelta replacement I bought is shiny, but I think I could.

The "after" pic is the result of about two weeks of soaking in EvapoRust, with a couple of scrubbings with a wire brush on the last two days, followed by a day soaking in vinegar (because I needed the EvapoRust spa for something else). The vinegar didn't improve the appearance at all, but I think it dissolved some of the gunk inside the links because the chain is moving better now than it had been.
evaporust is one of the few products that exceeds the hype...
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Old 06-02-21, 10:22 PM
  #372  
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Originally Posted by nlerner
As long as a deep fryer is involved, you're good.
Of course, how else would I get my chain crispy?
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Old 06-03-21, 03:07 PM
  #373  
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A lesson in overkill...

So in order to save a bit of financial room since people keep inflating my parts...I decided to see what I could do to a chain...
1. Soak in Dawn and water.
2. Soak in my toxic runoff stash of WD-40
3. Soak in Dawn and water.
4. Scrub aimlessly.
5. Throw in evaporust
6. Hours later...






For the record, there was so much grime, I didn’t see the rust until step 4...

No money added! Victory!
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Old 06-03-21, 03:09 PM
  #374  
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Originally Posted by jdawginsc
So in order to save a bit of financial room since people keep inflating my parts...I decided to see what I could do to a chain...
1. Soak in Dawn and water.
2. Soak in my toxic runoff stash of WD-40
3. Soak in Dawn and water.
4. Scrub aimlessly.
5. Throw in evaporust
6. Hours later...
Looking at your pictures, I think you mean "6. Throw it away and get a new chain", right?
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Old 06-03-21, 04:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Andy_K
Looking at your pictures, I think you mean "6. Throw it away and get a new chain", right?
Heck no! That thing is as smooth as silk now! However I reserve the right to add your suggestion as number 7...I just got a new shipment of triflow so I should be a’ight...

Sneak peek at Bumblebeena...with smooth as silk chain...

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