Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Cinelli SC Pista for commuting

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Cinelli SC Pista for commuting

Old 05-28-21, 09:17 PM
  #1  
Anfieldtramp
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Cinelli SC Pista for commuting

Hi all,

I recently managed to get a NOS Cinelli Supercorsa pista frame from a good friend in my size, and was thinking of building it up for commuting purposes. (There are no velodromes near where I live) I would like to know if anyone has owned one of these bikes before, and how do they ride? From the geometry charts provided on the Cinelli site, the frame doesn't seem crazy aggressive (for a track bike I mean), and it's a gorgeous frame. I also live in a very flat area with lots of rain year round, so I thought going on a fixed gear for commuting would make sense.

Do let me know your thoughts, thanks!
Anfieldtramp is offline  
Likes For Anfieldtramp:
Old 05-28-21, 09:38 PM
  #2  
Dylansbob 
2k miles from the midwest
 
Dylansbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Washington
Posts: 1,453

Bikes: ~'75 Colin Laing, '80s Schwinn SuperSport 650b, ex-Backroads ti project...

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 303 Post(s)
Liked 444 Times in 219 Posts
I've commuted for years on assorted fixed gears. I never minded the steep angles, but I'm used to the toe-overlap that comes with most any track bike under a 56cm. You'll be on your own for hauling your kit and/or water, no eyelets. Fenders will be impossible to fit, unless you lace up a set of 650b wheels and then potentially be limited to ~35mm tires by the frame.

You can commute on anything, but this sounds like the kind of thing that's best saved for special road rides or sell it to someone who likes to go in circles.
Dylansbob is offline  
Old 05-28-21, 09:41 PM
  #3  
scarlson 
Senior Member
 
scarlson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Medford MA
Posts: 1,491

Bikes: Ron Cooper touring, 1959 Jack Taylor 650b ladyback touring tandem, Vitus 979, Joe Bell painted Claud Butler Dalesman, Colin Laing curved tube tandem, heavily-Dilberted 1982 Trek 6xx, René Herse tandem

Mentioned: 51 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 685 Post(s)
Liked 830 Times in 465 Posts
The geometry doesn't seem untoward. That would be fine on the road, handling wise, I'd think.

The trouble is those forks have a track crown, don't they? You can't drill a track crown for a front brake. I'd not commute without a front brake, no matter how flat it is. S**t happens. Drivers are unpredictable. You need brakes.

You can get a Keirin brake adapter. They are expensive and there may not be room, depending on clearances. You could also get a different fork. Just about any 700c/27" fork should be ok.

Or disregard my post completely if you've got brakes worked out.
__________________
Owner & co-founder, Cycles René Hubris. Unfortunately attaching questionable braze-ons to perfectly good frames since about 2015. With style.
scarlson is offline  
Old 05-29-21, 12:00 AM
  #4  
P!N20
Senior Member
 
P!N20's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,594
Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 704 Post(s)
Liked 883 Times in 479 Posts
We need to see some pictures!
P!N20 is offline  
Likes For P!N20:
Old 05-29-21, 04:07 AM
  #5  
jeirvine 
Senior Member
 
jeirvine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Bethesda/Baltimore MD
Posts: 3,736

Bikes: '72 Moto Grand Record, '72 Gitane tandem, '72 Raleigh Super Course, '73 Raleigh Gran Sport, '73 and '76 Colnagos Super, '76 Fiorelli Coppi, '78 Raleigh SBDU Team Pro, '78 Trek 930, '81 Holdsworth Special 650B, '86 Masi GC, '87 Panasonic DX5000

Mentioned: 58 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 675 Post(s)
Liked 283 Times in 167 Posts
Depending on the year, that could be a quite valuable frame, especially NOS. If it were me, I would not use it as a commuter.
__________________
The man who dies with the most toys…is dead. - Rootboy
jeirvine is offline  
Likes For jeirvine:
Old 05-29-21, 04:44 AM
  #6  
clubman 
Youngman Grand
 
clubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 7,712

Bikes: roadsters, club bikes, fixed and classic

Mentioned: 107 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1882 Post(s)
Liked 1,047 Times in 703 Posts
When I think about commuting, it means taking risks, riding in bad weather, picking up stuff from stores and using a big effin' U lock whenever possible.
I wouldn't do that to an NOS SC. There's too many other nice road frames to convert.
clubman is offline  
Likes For clubman:
Old 05-29-21, 06:00 AM
  #7  
Anfieldtramp
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by jeirvine View Post
Depending on the year, that could be a quite valuable frame, especially NOS. If it were me, I would not use it as a commuter.
It's quite recent, from 2018!

Originally Posted by clubman View Post
When I think about commuting, it means taking risks, riding in bad weather, picking up stuff from stores and using a big effin' U lock whenever possible.
I wouldn't do that to an NOS SC. There's too many other nice road frames to convert.
Fair enough. Thing is, I've always had a thing for the vintage Italian track bikes, especially the lugged ones. I used to commute on a Wabi Classic, which admittedly is nothing similiar, so riding fixed isn't new to me. But i do see the point about commuter bikes generally being banged up after bad weather and constant use, which is something one might not want to do to a NOS Cinelli SC.

Originally Posted by scarlson View Post
The geometry doesn't seem untoward. That would be fine on the road, handling wise, I'd think.

The trouble is those forks have a track crown, don't they? You can't drill a track crown for a front brake. I'd not commute without a front brake, no matter how flat it is. S**t happens. Drivers are unpredictable. You need brakes.

Or disregard my post completely if you've got brakes worked out.
I actually was thinking of using the Keirin clamp on brake option!
Anfieldtramp is offline  
Old 05-29-21, 06:19 AM
  #8  
JohnDThompson 
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Posts: 23,046

Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2770 Post(s)
Liked 1,539 Times in 951 Posts
For commuting, especially in a rainy area, I'd want something with enough clearance for mudguards. And unless you have a safe place indoors to lock it up, I'd want something less flashy. An old English 3-speed served as my commuter for many years (retired now). Low maintenance (internally geared hub), mudguards, rack to carry things, no theft appeal, inexpensive. What's not to like?
JohnDThompson is offline  
Old 05-29-21, 11:56 AM
  #9  
uncleivan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 204

Bikes: '92 MX Leader, 84 Colnago Mexico, 85 Recherche, 92 Klein, 86 Panasonic ATB Pro, 88 Roberts, 80 moser, 90 Wojcik, 92 Spectrum... ect

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 44 Post(s)
Liked 61 Times in 37 Posts
I have a keirin brake for my samson, they make a couple types depending on the shape of the fork blades. Personally I like to ride it without the brakes. I don't really like the idea of the stress on the fork legs.
That said, they do make an adapter that mounts from underneath internally into the steertube through the fork crown.
(pictures are worth...)
On my bike I'm limited clearance wise and can barely fit a 24mm tire let alone with that mount. On yours it should work.
As far as a commuter, it's your bike, ride!
uncleivan is offline  
Old 05-30-21, 04:54 AM
  #10  
Anfieldtramp
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
I was also wondering about the stress on the fork from the clamp on front brake. If the brake is there for emergency purposes and legal reasons (since I'm quite confident in stopping using my legs most of the time), and it's not used very much at all, would it still be a problem for the structural integrity of the fork? My thinking is that since it won't be used often, it should be ok? Or is it just the fact of having something clamped to the fork that makes it in itself problematic.
Anfieldtramp is offline  
Old 05-30-21, 06:20 AM
  #11  
Johno59
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Cambridge UK
Posts: 774

Bikes: 1903 24 spd Sunbeam, 1927 Humber, 3 1930 Raleighs, 2 1940s Sunbeams, 2 1940s Raleighs, Rudge, 1950s Robin Hood, 1958 Claud Butler, 2 1973 Colnago Supers, Eddie Merckx, 2 1980 Holdsworth, EG Bates funny TT bike, another 6 or so 1990s bikes

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 308 Post(s)
Liked 275 Times in 150 Posts
Fixed is safer

On a fixed bike you have to anticipate everything. You dial into the road traffic otherwise you are roadkill. City couriers use fixed for this reason. I used a track bike in traffic for commuting, just change the forks with a drilled crown.
For the first 60 years all bikes had clamped on brakes- so no problem there. Resilion brakes were always clamp ons as well as most rod brakes.
Get a good coat for road spray and/or there are plenty frame mounted fenders to help out. You must have a front brake minimum (in Europe it is illegal and if an unbraked bike is involved in a crash the cyclists are treated the same as a drunk driver) pedestrians can't hear bikes and step out without looking. Many drivers simply don't care if you are on a bike competing for roadspace. You don't exist for some. A rear brake is next to useless for stopping.

Last edited by Johno59; 05-30-21 at 06:40 AM.
Johno59 is offline  
Old 05-30-21, 07:36 AM
  #12  
repechage
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 16,486
Mentioned: 110 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2078 Post(s)
Liked 910 Times in 708 Posts
Originally Posted by Anfieldtramp View Post
I was also wondering about the stress on the fork from the clamp on front brake. If the brake is there for emergency purposes and legal reasons (since I'm quite confident in stopping using my legs most of the time), and it's not used very much at all, would it still be a problem for the structural integrity of the fork? My thinking is that since it won't be used often, it should be ok? Or is it just the fact of having something clamped to the fork that makes it in itself problematic.
think about the forces and where applied
this is not a disc brake
plenty of other reasons to not use it all year but the clamp on brake does not worry me
repechage is offline  
Old 05-31-21, 01:38 AM
  #13  
Gary Fountain
Senior Member
 
Gary Fountain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Hervey Bay, Qld, Australia.
Posts: 2,855

Bikes: Colnago (82, 85, 89, 90, 91, 96, 03), 85 Cinelli, 90 Rossin, 83 Alan, 82 Bianchi, 78 Fountain, 2 x Pinarello, Malvern Star (37), Hillman (70's), 80's Beretto Lo-Pro Track, 80's Kenevans Lo-Pro, Columbus Max (95), DeGrandi (80's) Track.

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 151 Post(s)
Liked 116 Times in 83 Posts
I loved a track bike for commuting so I'm a bit envious. I also place Cinelli SC at the top of my bike list, again, I'm even more envious. Some of my most memorable times have been on a 'commuter' track bike. Now I wish I was young enough to enjoy those times all over again. Gee, this has been a 'sad' thread for me but a fantastic one for you Anfieldtramp. Wishing you all the best.


Oh yeah, with such an iconic frame I would be worried about fitting a brake to the Cinelli front fork. I'd try to source a replacement front fork that would accomodate a brake calliper. I can understand the urge to go brakeless - Shhhh - I'd go brakeless too.

Last edited by Gary Fountain; 05-31-21 at 01:45 AM.
Gary Fountain is offline  
Old 05-31-21, 03:43 AM
  #14  
Anfieldtramp
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Johno59 View Post
On a fixed bike you have to anticipate everything. You dial into the road traffic otherwise you are roadkill. City couriers use fixed for this reason. I used a track bike in traffic for commuting, just change the forks with a drilled crown.
For the first 60 years all bikes had clamped on brakes- so no problem there. Resilion brakes were always clamp ons as well as most rod brakes.
Get a good coat for road spray and/or there are plenty frame mounted fenders to help out. You must have a front brake minimum (in Europe it is illegal and if an unbraked bike is involved in a crash the cyclists are treated the same as a drunk driver) pedestrians can't hear bikes and step out without looking. Many drivers simply don't care if you are on a bike competing for roadspace. You don't exist for some. A rear brake is next to useless for stopping.
That's really interesting on the Resilion brakes, a cool piece of history. Thanks for letting me know!

Originally Posted by repechage View Post
think about the forces and where applied
this is not a disc brake
plenty of other reasons to not use it all year but the clamp on brake does not worry me
Yea, I was thinking the same thing as well. I actually am leaning towards using the brake adapater that inserts into the head tube; saw another thread from some time ago on this and a user was talking about how the SC pista fork has decent clearance for a track fork.

Originally Posted by Gary Fountain View Post
I loved a track bike for commuting so I'm a bit envious. I also place Cinelli SC at the top of my bike list, again, I'm even more envious. Some of my most memorable times have been on a 'commuter' track bike. Now I wish I was young enough to enjoy those times all over again. Gee, this has been a 'sad' thread for me but a fantastic one for you Anfieldtramp. Wishing you all the best.

Oh yeah, with such an iconic frame I would be worried about fitting a brake to the Cinelli front fork. I'd try to source a replacement front fork that would accomodate a brake calliper. I can understand the urge to go brakeless - Shhhh - I'd go brakeless too.
Aw thanks for the well wishes man! Much appreciated. My main concern about swapping out the fork would be how it would impact the handling of the bike tho. I heard that track frames with road forks can be very twitchy in handling,
Anfieldtramp is offline  
Old 05-31-21, 04:50 AM
  #15  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 26,267
Mentioned: 210 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14850 Post(s)
Liked 2,626 Times in 1,948 Posts
Originally Posted by P!N20 View Post
We need to see some pictures!
@Anfieldtramp's Album:
https://www.bikeforums.net/g/user/521356
https://www.bikeforums.net/g/album/18690715





Well,that doesn't look like a Cinelli.
CliffordK is online now  
Old 05-31-21, 05:05 AM
  #16  
iab
Senior Member
 
iab's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: NW Burbs, Chicago
Posts: 11,013
Mentioned: 158 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2324 Post(s)
Liked 1,677 Times in 745 Posts
Originally Posted by Anfieldtramp View Post
That's really interesting on the Resilion brakes, a cool piece of history. Thanks for letting me know!
Resillion had their offering, but on Italian bikes, Bowden was the brake of choice. I don't recommend them. Braking ceases to be an active verb and is only somewhat of a weak suggestion.

Frejus 49 by iabisdb, on Flickr
iab is offline  
Old 05-31-21, 05:07 AM
  #17  
Anfieldtramp
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
@Anfieldtramp's Album:






Well,that doesn't look like a Cinelli.
HAHA yea its been sold off already! That didn't actually belong to me though, was helping someone to hold it awhile. But it was a gorgeous frame. Wish it was mine
Anfieldtramp is offline  
Old 05-31-21, 05:22 AM
  #18  
Bianchigirll 
Bianchi Goddess
 
Bianchigirll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Shady Pines Retirement Fort Wayne, In
Posts: 27,667

Bikes: Too many to list here check my signature.

Mentioned: 146 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2059 Post(s)
Liked 928 Times in 564 Posts
Back in the day, 87-91, I commuted a lot and while I would occasionally ride my prized possession, a 90 Bianchi Proto, mostly I’d ride my older Sport SX or borrowed team Cannondale frame. personally I’d never buy something like that with the idea of commuting on it.
__________________
Bianchis '90 Proto, '90 Campione del Fausto Giamondi Specialisma Italiano Mundo, '91 Boarala 'cross, '93 Project 3, '86 Volpe, '97 Ti Megatube, '93 Reparto Corse SBX

Others but still loved; '80 Batavus Professional, '87 Cornelo, '?? Jane Doe (still on the drawing board), '90ish Haro Escape SLX Bertoni "Speckled Trout"
Bianchigirll is offline  
Old 05-31-21, 12:02 PM
  #19  
3alarmer
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 20,105

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 286 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22335 Post(s)
Liked 5,389 Times in 3,918 Posts
3alarmer is offline  
Likes For 3alarmer:
Old 05-31-21, 12:17 PM
  #20  
scarlson 
Senior Member
 
scarlson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Medford MA
Posts: 1,491

Bikes: Ron Cooper touring, 1959 Jack Taylor 650b ladyback touring tandem, Vitus 979, Joe Bell painted Claud Butler Dalesman, Colin Laing curved tube tandem, heavily-Dilberted 1982 Trek 6xx, René Herse tandem

Mentioned: 51 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 685 Post(s)
Liked 830 Times in 465 Posts
Originally Posted by Anfieldtramp View Post
My main concern about swapping out the fork would be how it would impact the handling of the bike tho. I heard that track frames with road forks can be very twitchy in handling,
The reason for that is that a road fork will normally have a bit more rake than a track fork. This combined with the steep head angle can result in a very low trail. And low trail geometry can be twitchy, especially at low speeds. At higher speeds, and/or with a front load, it's great.

Finding a road fork with very little rake would be a possibility, but a non-original fork would also ruin the aesthetic of the track bike. If you can get your hands on one of those Keirin adapters, it'll be a bit more seamless.
__________________
Owner & co-founder, Cycles René Hubris. Unfortunately attaching questionable braze-ons to perfectly good frames since about 2015. With style.
scarlson is offline  
Old 05-31-21, 01:14 PM
  #21  
Senrab62 
It's the little things
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 586

Bikes: Too many, yet not enough

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 195 Post(s)
Liked 196 Times in 84 Posts
My two cents

The clamp on brake, in question, made me nervous in my limited use. Plus I have seen pictures of fork damage caused by this setup. I used it once on a shakedown ride, and immediately went for the quill adapter option.

It is expensive, but a beautiful piece of machining. Shipping and service is top notch as well. Do it right the first time, it will be cheaper!

I too, considered the fork route, but expense would be approximately the same and would change the looks and characteristics of the bike as well. It is something to consider though as a fork designed for a brake caliper will offer best fit and performance of said caliper.

Good luck and keep us posted.
Senrab62 is offline  
Old 05-31-21, 01:30 PM
  #22  
3alarmer
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 20,105

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 286 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22335 Post(s)
Liked 5,389 Times in 3,918 Posts
I hope this might help in your decision...

...I know that it is declasse of me to bring this up, but I'll say it anyway. thre are a lot of relatively well constructed track frames coming out of Taiwan now, that are inexpensive compared to your Cinelli, and some of them are even drilled for a front brake. If you absolutely must have the experience of commuting on a track frame, build one of them up, or even buy a complete bike like a Bianchi Pista (depending on where the Pistadex is sitting on Craigslist right now).

You can build some kind of coaster brake rear wheel for your current frame, and it will be at least street legal in California and most states.

But there's no getting around the fenders, rack, and wider, more durable tyres that most people want on a commuter bike any place it rains and if you need to change clothes, carry your lunch, do any of the mundane things that are involved in commuting by bicycle year around. I believe this has already been covered by others offering advice.

Here are two photos of commuter bikes I've used in the past. the Raleigh three speed was by far the best all around commuter, but the black one is something I put together to go faster in good weather, which we have here for about six months out of the year in California. It originated as a "track" frame, made in Taiwan, and on half price year end sale from Performance online. It's smaller than any track bike I would ride for that purpose, because it turns out to be an advantage in traffic to have a more upright position for visuals. Those New York City messenger bike guys, with their heads down in full tuck, look impressive in the movies, but they have an unfortunate tendency to run into cars and stuff. Good luck. Bike commuting is one of life's grand adventures.


Slow but not too bad with custom lighter wheel rims.

Mechanicals built around a SRAM P5 IGH

A Bianchi with a flip flop hub, and some elevation for the bar provided with an up angled stem. By the time I got this, I was retired. Which I highly recommend when possible.
3alarmer is offline  
Likes For 3alarmer:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.