Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

How many CVers here were bike mechanics or bike manufacturers in your previous life?

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

How many CVers here were bike mechanics or bike manufacturers in your previous life?

Old 06-13-21, 09:25 PM
  #26  
badger_biker 
Senior Member
 
badger_biker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Rural Western Wisconsin
Posts: 1,460

Bikes: 10 vintage touring machines

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 99 Post(s)
Liked 93 Times in 47 Posts
I was the jack of all trades including mechanic in a small town shop in 1984. Sold mostly Bridgestone with some Gitane, Motobecane and Kuwahara. The shop tried to empathize touring bikes and equipment but mostly sold mid to low end Bridgestones.

Didn’t make much money but I developed a life long love of anything touring and bikes from the mid 80’s. I developed a sickness that directly resulted in 8 touring bikes vintage 1983 - 1987 hanging in my garage today😊
__________________
Nothing compares to the simple pleasure of a bike ride - JFK
badger_biker is offline  
Likes For badger_biker:
Old 06-13-21, 10:12 PM
  #27  
Jeff Wills
Insane Bicycle Mechanic
 
Jeff Wills's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: other Vancouver
Posts: 9,561
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 684 Post(s)
Liked 332 Times in 221 Posts
Originally Posted by pcb View Post
Hey Jeff, Euro-Asia was my account at Suntour USA, and Bob Hansing would always call me in Jersey late in the day, and want his orders shipped to Cali the same day. We had a very surly warehouse mgr who'd make me pack/box my own pain-in-the-rear rush orders ("I don't care what Bob Hansing wants, I ain't packing it. If you want it out today, box it yourself."). One particular rush order I was low on boxes, UPS was waiting, so I packed 4 or 5 smaller boxes to get it out the door. Bob called me after the order arrived, "What idiot packed my order? Do you know how much extra I had to pay for all those boxes?!?" I said: "That idiot was me, Bob. That's what happens when you call me that late." There was silence for a bit, then "Oh....," no more yelling, no apology, but he start calling earlier in the day. RIP.
Yeah, that sounds like Bob. I grew to like him a lot- he had his own way of doing business but it served him well. I visit Euro-Asia when I'm down there- it really hasn't changed that much. They still have a ton of NOS Campy and Shimano- some of it in boxes that I labeled 30 years ago. Kind of like the warehouse at the end of Indiana Jones.
__________________
Jeff Wills

Comcast nuked my web page. It will return soon..
Jeff Wills is offline  
Old 06-14-21, 01:59 AM
  #28  
Cougrrcj 
Over forty victim of Fate
 
Cougrrcj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 3,831

Bikes: A few...

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 585 Post(s)
Liked 322 Times in 225 Posts
I did once, for one weekend only. The amily-owned shop where I bought my first two bottom-of-the-barrel Fujis (all steel '74 Special Tourers) hired me to assemble bikes one weekend. His normal wrench was off on vacation and asked me if I wanted to help out. All I can remember was that I had unboxed, assembled, and adjusted probably five or six bikes on each of the two days. Must have been sometime in October '75 since the World Series was playing on the radio... I had to true/tension the wheels, insert stem/handlebars/seatpost/saddle, bolt on the brakes, run/cut/adjust the brake cables. install the derailleurs, run/cut adjust the derailleur cables, install the chain, pedals... I think the shop dealt with Fuji, Kabuki, and a few others. It normally had about fifty bikes on the sales floor at any one time, ranging from kids bikes to the whole line of Fujis. I later bought my S-10S from the same shop at a discount because it was a scratched floor model... I lusted after the America, but it was twice the price of the 'scratch & dent' S-10S. Oh, they had some higher-end models, but I wanted nothing to do with tubulars...
__________________
'75 Fuji S-10S bought new, 52k+ miles and still going!
'84 Univega Gran Tourismo
'84 Univega Viva Sport
'86 Miyata 710
'90 Schwinn Woodlands
Unknown brand MTB of questionable lineage aka 'Mutt Trail Bike'
Plus or minus a few others from time-to-time

Cougrrcj is offline  
Old 06-14-21, 02:17 PM
  #29  
bulgie
blahblahblah chrome moly
 
bulgie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Seattle
Posts: 635
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 359 Post(s)
Liked 509 Times in 265 Posts
Me, 6 years ('71-'76) as a LBS mechanic and retail sales person, 4 years of that part-time while in high school (full-time summers). Five different shops.

Then 22 years ('77-'98) as a full-time custom framebuilder, also spread over 5 different shops. Santana, Rodriguez + Erickson (R+E), Counterpoint, Davidson, Ti Cycles, and Match (Schwinn Paramount & some Rivendells). That makes 6, but Counterpoint hardly counts; I was brought in as a consultant to improve the design and manufacturing processes.

I've been out of the biz for 23 years. When Match failed and went out of business, I switched to IT consulting to make some money, something you don't see in a bike shop job. I do miss it though and I'm trying to set up a home shop to build frames as a hobby.

Mark B
bulgie is offline  
Old 06-14-21, 03:39 PM
  #30  
mgopack42 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Los Banos, CA
Posts: 748

Bikes: 2020 Argon 18 Krypton Pro, 2012 Pinarello FP Quatro, 1994 Specialized Allez, 1985 Masi 3V Volumetrica.

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 285 Post(s)
Liked 242 Times in 136 Posts
Originally Posted by badger_biker View Post
I was the jack of all trades including mechanic in a small town shop in 1984. Sold mostly Bridgestone with some Gitane, Motobecane and Kuwahara. The shop tried to empathize touring bikes and equipment but mostly sold mid to low end Bridgestones.

Didn’t make much money but I developed a life long love of anything touring and bikes from the mid 80’s. I developed a sickness that directly resulted in 8 touring bikes vintage 1983 - 1987 hanging in my garage today😊
curious about where in western WI you worked.
I will tell my boring story too, in case anyone is interested. I started wrenching on my own bikes as young as 13 or 14, always tinkering, adjusting, upgrading etc. When I went away to college in 1978 in River Falls WI, I took a bicycle maintenance class at the local bike shop... The Village Pedaler if IRC. it was a multi week course on a weeknight. I helped all of the students with their bikes, my Aerospace Pro didn't need any maintenance. At the end of the night, Tim asked me why I took the class, and I said I wanted to learn about trueing and building wheels. he offered me a job, and I worked there during the school year for 2 years. Tim was a frame builder, and he and I designed a custom for me, and I did a lot of the work, and he wielded the torch. When I moved back to Green Bay (to be closer to my GF, (kids huh?, but I am still married to her, so there is that!) I started working at Wheels and Boards for the summers as a second job. mostly as a mechanic, and once in a while helping on the sales floor. I did that from 1980 to 1985. I took a lot of my earnings in bike stuff, so it was a good thing I lived with mom and dad, and had a day job! I still remember the blue 3Rensho frame that was hanging on the wall there, and lusting after it! That and Phil's very early Allez, that was a hot bike!
mgopack42 is offline  
Old 06-14-21, 03:50 PM
  #31  
tiger1964 
Senior Member
 
tiger1964's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 1,398

Bikes: Drysdale/Gitane/Zeus/Masi/Falcon/Palo Alto

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 455 Post(s)
Liked 157 Times in 109 Posts
Worked at three different LBS in MD, 1974-1978, basically my college years. 30hr/wk. Probably 70% new-bike assembly, the remainder split between floor sales and repairs. Low point was 2 days trying to decode one of those 2-speed rear hubs and failing; boss couldn't figure it out either so he bought the customer a new wheel. High point was hand grinding a crank pin for a penny farthing, and being allowed to ride the bike briefly as a reward.
__________________
Larry:1958 Drysdale, 1961 Gitane Gran Sport, 1974 Zeus track, 1988 Masi Gran Corsa, 1974 Falcon, 1980 Palo Alto. Susan: 1976 Windsor Profesional.
tiger1964 is offline  
Old 06-14-21, 05:00 PM
  #32  
daka
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 262

Bikes: Raleigh Super Course x2, Raleigh International

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 121 Post(s)
Liked 138 Times in 84 Posts
[QUOTE=nlerner;22099838]California Bikes, Palo Alto, CA, 1986-1989: Small, family-owned shop where I did a bit of everything while I was getting my master’s degree at San Jose State. It’s where I learned to overhaul Sturmey Archer 3-speed hubs and dread when someone would bring in a Firenze for repair. The first year or two we actually patched flatted tubes for $5 while the customer waited. Carried mid-level Nishikis and one or two other brands that I don’t remember. They had just about gone out of business when I left after completing my degree, and the owner, Fred Morse, moved to Napa, where he became a painter/artist.

I worked at the same shop a little more than a decade before you did while I was going to school at Foothill JC. The shop then was run by Fritz' parents, Freddy and Helen, and Fritz and Virginia had just gotten married. I don't claim to have been a competent mechanic, Freddy and Fritz did all the challenging work, I did assembly and fixed a sh**load of flats. In the 70s the shop was a Raleigh dealer and also sold Gitane, Centurion, Nishiki, and the occasional Zeus. With the likes of Cupertino Bike Shop and Sugden & Lynch just minutes away, Freddy largely just avoided the high-end market - Stanford students, faculty and Palo Alto suburbanites were his bread & butter. The entire Morse family was very good to me and for that I am grateful.

I knew the Garner twins when they had the bike shop in South Palo Alto, my wife and three kids all rode bikes that were purchased there, as the shop is just a few blocks from my house. Who knows, we may have met during the time you worked there?
daka is offline  
Old 06-14-21, 05:08 PM
  #33  
tricky 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Upper Left, USA
Posts: 1,680
Mentioned: 48 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 526 Post(s)
Liked 300 Times in 204 Posts
I worked at Performance in the University District in Seattle from mid 2010 to mid-2011 doing sales and some repair work. The rest of my "pro" mechanic experience is volunteering at Bikeworks.
tricky is offline  
Old 06-14-21, 05:12 PM
  #34  
nlerner
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 14,679
Mentioned: 362 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2395 Post(s)
Liked 2,266 Times in 1,122 Posts
[QUOTE=daka;22102164]
Originally Posted by nlerner View Post
California Bikes, Palo Alto, CA, 1986-1989: Small, family-owned shop where I did a bit of everything while I was getting my master’s degree at San Jose State. It’s where I learned to overhaul Sturmey Archer 3-speed hubs and dread when someone would bring in a Firenze for repair. The first year or two we actually patched flatted tubes for $5 while the customer waited. Carried mid-level Nishikis and one or two other brands that I don’t remember. They had just about gone out of business when I left after completing my degree, and the owner, Fred Morse, moved to Napa, where he became a painter/artist.

I worked at the same shop a little more than a decade before you did while I was going to school at Foothill JC. The shop then was run by Fritz' parents, Freddy and Helen, and Fritz and Virginia had just gotten married. I don't claim to have been a competent mechanic, Freddy and Fritz did all the challenging work, I did assembly and fixed a sh**load of flats. In the 70s the shop was a Raleigh dealer and also sold Gitane, Centurion, Nishiki, and the occasional Zeus. With the likes of Cupertino Bike Shop and Sugden & Lynch just minutes away, Freddy largely just avoided the high-end market - Stanford students, faculty and Palo Alto suburbanites were his bread & butter. The entire Morse family was very good to me and for that I am grateful.

I knew the Garner twins when they had the bike shop in South Palo Alto, my wife and three kids all rode bikes that were purchased there, as the shop is just a few blocks from my house. Who knows, we may have met during the time you worked there?
Hah, that’s awesome. Yes, Fred and Virginia were very good to me. They had a daughter, Kelly, while I worked for them, and Fred started making wooden toys and crafts and selling them in the bike shop in a section marked “Kelly’s Country Corner.” Business was pretty darn slow the last year I was there, and I was often working by myself. Plenty of time to take apart and rebuild 3-speed hubs. Fred Sr. would pop in frequently; he was wiry and fit and very amiable. He still ran the shop on the Stanford campus, mostly selling used bikes, iirc. Fred also sold me my first Raleigh: a ‘79 Super Course that he had bought new (this was around 1987). I put a ton of miles on that bike.

Btw, had I stayed in the Bay Area, it would have been my dream job to land a teaching position at Foothill College. Beautiful place!
nlerner is offline  
Old 06-14-21, 05:17 PM
  #35  
jjames1452 
Senior Member
 
jjames1452's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Dayton, Ohio
Posts: 1,367

Bikes: Trek 720, Trek 620, Trek 520, Steel Schwinns, AD Puch, Kona, Nishiki Pro, All City Disc Spacehorse, Waterford

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Liked 63 Times in 38 Posts
Me

South Side Cycle and Mower in the South end of Columbus, Seibert and Parsons Avenue. We were a Schwinn Shop. Early 80's. I have one of the two hand built bikes I made back in the day. Good memories.
jjames1452 is offline  
Old 06-14-21, 07:34 PM
  #36  
jdawginsc 
Edumacator
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Goose Creek, SC
Posts: 2,402

Bikes: '87 Crestdale, '87 Basso Gap, '92 Rossin Performance EL-OS, Faggin Matrix thingy

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 729 Post(s)
Liked 572 Times in 388 Posts
This is awesome! Great stories and interesting Kevin Bacon degrees of connection!

bulgie Glad you are building once more!
__________________
1987 Crest Cannondale, 1987 Basso Gap, 1992 Rossin Performance EL, 1990ish Van Tuyl, 1980s Vanni Losa Cassani thingy, 1988 Faggin Matrix with not Matrix tubes, 1990ish MBK Atlantique, 1982 Rossin Record, 1987 Trek Elance

jdawginsc is offline  
Likes For jdawginsc:
Old 06-14-21, 10:19 PM
  #37  
badger_biker 
Senior Member
 
badger_biker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Rural Western Wisconsin
Posts: 1,460

Bikes: 10 vintage touring machines

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 99 Post(s)
Liked 93 Times in 47 Posts
Originally Posted by mgopack42 View Post
curious about where in western WI you worked.
I will tell my boring story too, in case anyone is interested. I started wrenching on my own bikes as young as 13 or 14, always tinkering, adjusting, upgrading etc. When I went away to college in 1978 in River Falls WI, I took a bicycle maintenance class at the local bike shop... The Village Pedaler if IRC. it was a multi week course on a weeknight. I helped all of the students with their bikes, my Aerospace Pro didn't need any maintenance. At the end of the night, Tim asked me why I took the class, and I said I wanted to learn about trueing and building wheels. he offered me a job, and I worked there during the school year for 2 years. Tim was a frame builder, and he and I designed a custom for me, and I did a lot of the work, and he wielded the torch. When I moved back to Green Bay (to be closer to my GF, (kids huh?, but I am still married to her, so there is that!) I started working at Wheels and Boards for the summers as a second job. mostly as a mechanic, and once in a while helping on the sales floor. I did that from 1980 to 1985. I took a lot of my earnings in bike stuff, so it was a good thing I lived with mom and dad, and had a day job! I still remember the blue 3Rensho frame that was hanging on the wall there, and lusting after it! That and Phil's very early Allez, that was a hot bike!
You never know the connections on these forums! Someone I worked with in a landscaping company and his brother wanted to purchase the remains of The Village Pedaler in RF and asked if I was interested in running it for them. I’d wrenched on my own bikes for years and decided to try it.

Tim Paterek used to stop by on a beautiful tandem he built with his daughter along and was always willing to provide advice. He was building bikes out of his home at the time and had people come to help build their bikes on occasion. My biggest regret is that I was strapped for cash having year old twin boys and that I wasn’t able to have Tim build something for me at the time.

I have fond memories from my 2 years in the the shop before the owners got out of it and still have the 1984 Bridgestone 400 I got there. I rode it on a few tours and still ride it as an urban trail bike.
__________________
Nothing compares to the simple pleasure of a bike ride - JFK
badger_biker is offline  
Old 06-15-21, 06:05 AM
  #38  
mgopack42 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Los Banos, CA
Posts: 748

Bikes: 2020 Argon 18 Krypton Pro, 2012 Pinarello FP Quatro, 1994 Specialized Allez, 1985 Masi 3V Volumetrica.

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 285 Post(s)
Liked 242 Times in 136 Posts
Originally Posted by badger_biker View Post
You never know the connections on these forums! Someone I worked with in a landscaping company and his brother wanted to purchase the remains of The Village Pedaler in RF and asked if I was interested in running it for them. I’d wrenched on my own bikes for years and decided to try it.

Tim Paterek used to stop by on a beautiful tandem he built with his daughter along and was always willing to provide advice. He was building bikes out of his home at the time and had people come to help build their bikes on occasion. My biggest regret is that I was strapped for cash having year old twin boys and that I wasn’t able to have Tim build something for me at the time.

I have fond memories from my 2 years in the the shop before the owners got out of it and still have the 1984 Bridgestone 400 I got there. I rode it on a few tours and still ride it as an urban trail bike.
Yeah, Small world for sure. I still have Park cone wrenches with "PATEREK" engraved on them in my tool box. My wife (GF at the time) and I used to borrow Tim's tandem, and go out to dinner at a country club somewhere around RF. The head chef was a guy I knew from the Village Pedaler who rode a Paramount, and teased me because my bike didn't have lugs, so it HAD to be crap (Aerospae Pro) When I worked there, Tim was always tinkering with trailers for that tandem. The one I remember was the aluminum skin of a airplane wing tip, covering a CrMo lattice frame. I sometimes think about contacting him, and seeing if he still has that tandem.
Mark

Last edited by mgopack42; 06-15-21 at 06:10 AM.
mgopack42 is offline  
Old 06-15-21, 07:04 AM
  #39  
Rocket-Sauce 
Port
 
Rocket-Sauce's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Boston
Posts: 8,407

Bikes: 2021 Calfee Draqonfly 44, 1984 Peter Mooney, 2017 Soma Stanyan, 1990 Fuji Ace, 1990 Bridgestone RB-1, 1995 Independent Fabrications Track, 2003 Calfee Dragonfly Pro

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 700 Post(s)
Liked 584 Times in 385 Posts
I worked sales and as a mechanic at a LBS. Just enough to keep an employee discount and a good chunk of my paycheck want right back to the shop. Mostly assembling low end mountain bikes for college kids, tune ups, fixing flats etc.

I was a bike messenger full time for 5 years while in grad school. Now that was fun.
Rocket-Sauce is offline  
Old 06-15-21, 07:13 AM
  #40  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 18,796

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 161 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5234 Post(s)
Liked 1,862 Times in 1,217 Posts
I worked for a few years in the latter part of the 80s at the Bikesmith in New Orleans. I worked mainly sales when I was in college but I also built bikes and did repairs. At different times the shop sold Peugeots, Treks, Miyatas, and Bridgestones. The shop sold a lot of Peugeots. I was lucky enough to have worked for a year part time in a bike shop in Paris as well selling mainly Motobecanes. I bought one and commuted everywhere on a bike. There weren't a lot of commuters on bikes then in Paris and it was more than a little crazy but fun. I've always liked French bikes.

Last edited by bikemig; 06-15-21 at 08:23 PM.
bikemig is offline  
Likes For bikemig:
Old 06-15-21, 07:22 AM
  #41  
seedsbelize 
smelling the roses
 
seedsbelize's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Tixkokob, Yucatán, México
Posts: 15,428

Bikes: 79 Trek 930, 80 Trek 414, 84 Schwinn Letour Luxe (coupled), 92 Schwinn Paramount PDG 5

Mentioned: 104 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7079 Post(s)
Liked 890 Times in 605 Posts
I maintained a rental fleet, in Merida, on a volunteer basis, up until Covid struck. 90s Mongoose mtbs and Cannondale hybrids. A much more recent past life. I learned about threadless stems and headsets.
__________________
Originally Posted by Bah Humbug View Post
Auto-pause is a honey-tongued devil whispering sweet lies in your ear.


seedsbelize is offline  
Old 06-15-21, 02:31 PM
  #42  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: High Falls, NY, USA
Posts: 39,989

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 486 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6909 Post(s)
Liked 1,566 Times in 991 Posts
I started working as a shop mechanic in my senior year in high school, 1978. I worked as a mechanic and salesman in summers of 1978, 1979, and 1980. Then I started working 12 months a year as a mechanic as I took a leave from college. I even became head mechanic of the esteemed Toga Bike Shop in 1981-1983. Eventually, I was able to get work in my field, computer science, and I left the industry. I taught bike mechanics to children and adults as a volunteer for a bike advocacy group I co-founded in NJ in 2009. In 2011 and 2014, I was between IT jobs and worked as a shop mechanic in NJ and NYC, respectively. The latter job was with my FIRST boss from 1978! In 2019, I "found my tribe" and worked as a volunteer at Mechanical Gardens in Brooklyn, a coop, teaching people about bikes and how to fix them. Then Pandemic came, and I haven't been back. I plan to go back when I return to the city. I love working there.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Likes For noglider:
Old 06-15-21, 10:10 PM
  #43  
badger_biker 
Senior Member
 
badger_biker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Rural Western Wisconsin
Posts: 1,460

Bikes: 10 vintage touring machines

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 99 Post(s)
Liked 93 Times in 47 Posts
Originally Posted by mgopack42 View Post
Yeah, Small world for sure. I still have Park cone wrenches with "PATEREK" engraved on them in my tool box. My wife (GF at the time) and I used to borrow Tim's tandem, and go out to dinner at a country club somewhere around RF. The head chef was a guy I knew from the Village Pedaler who rode a Paramount, and teased me because my bike didn't have lugs, so it HAD to be crap (Aerospae Pro) When I worked there, Tim was always tinkering with trailers for that tandem. The one I remember was the aluminum skin of a airplane wing tip, covering a CrMo lattice frame. I sometimes think about contacting him, and seeing if he still has that tandem.
Mark
Coolest thing I remember about that tandem is that the bottom connecting tube had a filler cap on top and a pet cock underneath so it could be used to store camp stove fuel. I thought that was such a great idea at the time.
__________________
Nothing compares to the simple pleasure of a bike ride - JFK
badger_biker is offline  
Likes For badger_biker:
Old 06-16-21, 04:58 PM
  #44  
old's'cool
curmudgineer
 
old's'cool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Chicago SW burbs
Posts: 4,371

Bikes: 2 many 2 fit here

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 240 Post(s)
Liked 48 Times in 35 Posts
Originally Posted by mechanicmatt View Post
... I believe the year I competed for ASME HPV competition I came in as the 15th fastest male and through a mistake the 6th fastest female 🤣.
Sounds like a very serious mistake!
old's'cool is offline  
Likes For old's'cool:
Old 06-16-21, 07:05 PM
  #45  
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 20,547

Bikes: 1959 Capo Modell Campagnolo; 1960 Capo Sieger (2); 1962 Carlton Franco Suisse; 1970 Peugeot UO-8; 1982 Bianchi Campione d'Italia; 1988 Schwinn Project KOM-10;

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1017 Post(s)
Liked 441 Times in 323 Posts
Heck yeah. As a UCLA undergrad I worked vacations and weekends as a repair tech in the hi-fi/audio department of Henry Radio. Starting in my senior year of college, I worked in a friend's small used bike shop, then switched to Bikecology, a Peugeot/Nishiki dealership, when that shop closed. I worked Friday nights (often until 11 pm or so) and all day Saturdays at various branches of Bikecology for a couple of years, until I got a graduate fellowship and then a career-related internship. Having grown up in Los Angeles, I knew some of our customers or their kids.

My favorite story was from 1973, when the father of one of my childhood friends popped into the shop and was trying to figure out how I knew him and his son. At this point I was in top physical shape, having completed a double century in 1972. He finally said, "Oh ... you were that little ROUND kid!" :Guilty as charged -- bicycling was a life-changer and probably life-saver for me.
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Carlton: 1962 Franco Suisse, S/N K7911
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline  
Old 06-18-21, 01:04 AM
  #46  
tungsten
Senior Member
 
tungsten's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 134

Bikes: 1962 Cinelli Mod. "B" / 1988 Bailey 531c / '92 Rocky Vertex / Obed Baseline / CroMag Wideangle/

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 57 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 7 Posts
I was driving a cab in 1984 when I started lacing and building wheels part time for an operation which was suppling the wheels for the mtn. bike frames being imported from Taiwan for a little start up named Rocky Mtn. Bicycles. We worked in a sweltering hot, stuffy, windowless little mezzanine behind the small Rocky warehouse above a shop named Bikes on Broadway.
The standing joke was that I wasn't working for a paycheck, I was just there for the bike parts.
After a few months they moved the wheel building to a shop in a small industrial park way out by the south arm of the Fraser River and being pretty sick of driving hack I jumped into the bike biz full time.
In the shop alongside us Paul Brodie and Derek Bailey were fillet brazing mtn. bike frames (Derek was also gaz welding lugged road frames). Some guy named Ross who billed himself as the only Irish Jew busker in BC was painting the frames. That ended when he asked WCB to come check the quaility of the air he was breathing and the new part owner of the company told him that "we aren't running a charity here" to which he replied "they're my lungs *****".
Upshot was that Ross quit and the following weekend, reposing up at Whistler, in an ancient log cabin that used to be a brothel, after riding in the precusor to the Cheakamus Challenge, a race then named See Colours and Puke (because you were supposed to eat magic mushrooms beforehand), Paul recruited me to become the painter. And after a cursory introduction to bike painting I was left on my own figure it out.

To be continued.......

Last edited by tungsten; 06-18-21 at 01:17 AM.
tungsten is offline  
Likes For tungsten:
Old 06-18-21, 02:17 AM
  #47  
bulgie
blahblahblah chrome moly
 
bulgie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Seattle
Posts: 635
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 359 Post(s)
Liked 509 Times in 265 Posts
Originally Posted by tungsten View Post
<snip> he asked WCB to come check the quality of the air he was breathing and the new part owner of the company told him that "we aren't running a charity here" to which he replied "they're my lungs *****".
I worked at Santana from right when they started. Built workbenches, ran electrical and compressed-air lines etc. I was not supposed to be a painter but I did paint one or two early prototypes before they had their real painter, or even a spray booth. Just plastic sheets hung from the ceiling to make a sort of room, not to protect me but to keep the paint from drifting over and getting on the other machinery, bike parts etc. No respirator. DON'T DO THIS!!

When I went home and blew my nose, I saw metalflake blue snot on the kleenex. This was Imron, famous for being incredibly toxic... though they didn't tell me that at the time. They probably didn't know either. Everyone there was more or less a beginner at everything. But I do remember the two older guys who had actually built frames before were not volunteering to go into the "Paint Room of Death" themselves. No, get the apprentice to do it, they're expendable.

Does isocyanate poisoning cause you to write long rambling posts on the internet? If so that would explain a lot.

Mark B
bulgie is offline  
Old 06-18-21, 10:21 PM
  #48  
Jeff Wills
Insane Bicycle Mechanic
 
Jeff Wills's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: other Vancouver
Posts: 9,561
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 684 Post(s)
Liked 332 Times in 221 Posts
Originally Posted by jdawginsc View Post
This is awesome! Great stories and interesting Kevin Bacon degrees of connection!

bulgie Glad you are building once more!
Yeah, the connections are weird. When I was growing up in Southern California you got used to meeting celebrities in casual situations.

Then again, South Pasadena stood in for a lot of small towns. The block where my shop used to be appears in this clip from Teen Wolf (about 1:40 to 2:10). The "hardware store" was Balk's Hardware- a local institution and next door to the bike shop..

__________________
Jeff Wills

Comcast nuked my web page. It will return soon..
Jeff Wills is offline  
Old 06-19-21, 01:42 PM
  #49  
repechage
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 16,135
Mentioned: 109 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1969 Post(s)
Liked 805 Times in 624 Posts
I started earning money working on bikes of neighbors at age 9.
Tall for my age helped and I kept my bike very clean.
I recall having to go to the local library and find the book that explained how to adjust a Sturmey-Archer shift linkage.
got my first paycheck bike shop job at 14.
was bummed that my very first task was to clean the wood staircase to the upstairs office, it WAS really dirty, but did not complain, part of the job, was counseled by my Mom that the initial tasked might be tests of resolve.
I could do the work but learned to do it fast, diagnose the problems quickly and often do a small easy to do but big notice added fix as part of the job. ( that and always place the bike if a geared bike in a slightly lower gear, customers always were please, “ so much easier to pedal now!” “ yes it is.
worked outdoors mostly to start along with the bread and butter mechanic, Willie T. Brooks.
Who was a bike mechanic by day and a jazz drummer by night. No idea when he slept.
maybe from 3-7am?
He was able to say things to the Beverly Hills women that would have earned a slap on the face from anyone else. A different time.
repechage is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.