Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

What is the Modern Day Equal to the Mid-Late 80s Trek 400

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

What is the Modern Day Equal to the Mid-Late 80s Trek 400

Old 06-20-21, 02:47 PM
  #26  
Germany_chris
Senior Member
 
Germany_chris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Southern Germany
Posts: 1,501
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 311 Post(s)
Liked 457 Times in 245 Posts


The cross check is a $500ish dollar frame the could probably be a runner for $800-$900 with some eBay/Amazon deals..
Germany_chris is offline  
Likes For Germany_chris:
Old 06-20-21, 09:40 PM
  #27  
CleanClassics
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2021
Location: United States
Posts: 17
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Wow this thread has been really helpful. I didn't realize how active the classic bike community was. When I'm working on classic cars it usually takes a few days before I can get a response to a question. You guys are fantastic.

Originally Posted by fishboat View Post
If your dad tends to like sitting upright more than the road bike (drop bars) posture, look into the Trek 7.x FX series. (7.1, 7.2...etc). The 7.5 is a nice, fast, comfortable bike with decent tires on it(dump the hardcase tires they come with..replace with Panaracer Gravelking slicks 700x35).
Thank you for that info. I actually have a Trek FX that I use around my area. From time to time we ride together to something local so I go on my mountain bike and he takes my FX. He likes it because it's super light, but he's definitely a fan of the drop bars. I honestly don't know why. I could never get used to them, but he likes them. He had drop bars since he was a kid, so he just might be used to them.

Originally Posted by tkamd73 View Post
Trek 400s are pretty easy to find, they made a lot of them. Donít know where you live, but searching my local Milwaukee Craigslist site, there are currently 9 listed.
Of all my bikes, my 88 400t is my favorite, the most versatile, and gets the most miles. Found it hanging in a shed in San Antonio rotting away, cleaned it up, and upgraded the wheels, not a fan of Treks Matrix rims and Mallard hubs. Good luck replicating the feel and ride of a 400, with a modern bike.
Tim

1988 Trek 400t
That bike is really nice

Mine was a similar story, a local guy posted that he needed to clear space in his garage and this bike needed out. I liked the look of the red (even though at the time it was grey/brown covered in dust). The tire rubber had turned to plastic and since they were old cloth side wall it was all tearing and ripping. But it was exciting to have something new to work on, and I had fun restoring it. I even got the retro cycle-computer to work on it.

Originally Posted by Korina View Post
CleanClassics , what the guys are asking is, what city and state do you live in? Some of them really want to go CL shopping for you; it's a fun hobby. I don't think anyone will track you down and stalk you with that minimal info.
Gotcha. I'm in SE Michigan.

Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
Great looking bike. The light blue and yellow with the black rims works nicely together. I like running aero levers on my vintage bikes as well especially when running a fat tire to give me a double quick release for the front wheel. And it does provide better braking.

Yeah of all my bikes, my 1979 Trek 510 gets the most miles. Trek just dialed it in with the sports touring geometry.
Looks great! How are the brakes? When I was restoring a few bikes with the Trek400 I had a late 70s, maybe early 80s Ross bike. I really disliked the brakes on it and figured that was just how brakes were in that era (I could've been wrong), so I told myself not to get bikes older than mid 80s. But if this assessment is wrong let me know.

Originally Posted by fettsvenska View Post
One other thing that might help is to know what your budget is? If you're working on a tight budget, then I would suggest you just be patient try to find another older steel Trek. They can still be found, usually for a very reasonable price. If you have the budget and willingness to pay for a new bike, there are some great options. Previous responses referenced Soma and Surly Cross Check. The brand new bike will certainly cost more. The had to pay $1,279 for my brand new Cross Check last month. One other disadvantage of buying new is that right now the inventory is quite low due to supply chain constraints from the COVID pandemic.
Yeah... Inventory has been a problem. I split my time 50/50 between mountain biking and biking around town. Last year I waited all year to get my first new mountain bike (I mountain biked for years on borrowed or used equipment). Inventory came back around November, so I can wait till fall. My area is seasonal so as winter approaches the bike stores inventory and service get better (luckily).

As for used budget, I usually try to stay below $<200-$300, depending on the condition. I'm ok with going over if I know the bike will keep its value. I've done that before with mountain and hybrid bikes, where I dropped $500 on a used bike, rode it for a bit, cleaned and maintained it, then when I needed to upgrade I was able to get my $500 back.

For new bikes the prices of the 520, Domane AL2, or Surly, are pretty much our max.

Originally Posted by Germany_chris View Post

The cross check is a $500ish dollar frame the could probably be a runner for $800-$900 with some eBay/Amazon deals..
I like the look of Surly (and the price!)... but I don't think I have much access to Surly in my area. I looked up online it looks like I have some stores that might have access but I'll need to investigate a bit more and see if I can find something.
CleanClassics is offline  
Old 06-21-21, 02:51 AM
  #28  
Lazyass
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Minas Ithil
Posts: 9,245
Mentioned: 63 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2378 Post(s)
Liked 558 Times in 344 Posts
Originally Posted by clubman View Post
pic assist

That picture brings back memories of when I bought a red 400 on ebay about 12 years ago. When I got it I noticed the downtube/fork was slightly bent from a head on collision that you couldn't see in the pictures. And I could never contact the seller, he ripped me off.
Lazyass is offline  
Old 06-21-21, 04:52 AM
  #29  
fishboat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 1,289

Bikes: Lemond '01 Maillot Jaune, Lemond '02 Victoire, Lemond '03 Poprad, Lemond '03 Wayzata drop bar conv(Poprad), '79 AcerMex Windsor Carrera Professional(purchased new), '88 GT Tequesta(purchased new), '01 Bianchi Grizzly, 1993 Trek 970 drop bar conv

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 467 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 396 Times in 232 Posts
OP..from your comments, you may enjoy the youtube channel "OldShovel" ..

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzr...x2JFfJb-ipGk8A
fishboat is offline  
Old 06-21-21, 05:07 AM
  #30  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 19,001

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 164 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5311 Post(s)
Liked 1,992 Times in 1,302 Posts
Originally Posted by CleanClassics View Post


Looks great! How are the brakes? When I was restoring a few bikes with the Trek400 I had a late 70s, maybe early 80s Ross bike. I really disliked the brakes on it and figured that was just how brakes were in that era (I could've been wrong), so I told myself not to get bikes older than mid 80s. But if this assessment is wrong let me know.


The brakes on the Ross bike simply could have been crummy brakes. If you have decent quality vintage brakes, it is easy to set them up properly. You can improve braking by (1) quality brake shoes (kool stop makes good ones) and (2) quality housing and cables. Also modern aero levers can help.
bikemig is online now  
Old 06-21-21, 10:08 PM
  #31  
CleanClassics
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2021
Location: United States
Posts: 17
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by Lazyass View Post
That picture brings back memories of when I bought a red 400 on ebay about 12 years ago. When I got it I noticed the downtube/fork was slightly bent from a head on collision that you couldn't see in the pictures. And I could never contact the seller, he ripped me off.
Sorry to hear that, eBay is really the wild west in it's current state. I've been on it since its beanie baby days but since around 2014 onwards it's been hit or miss for me.

Were you able to get a new fork to get er running?

Originally Posted by fishboat View Post
OP..from your comments, you may enjoy the youtube channel "OldShovel" ..
I do like watching restoration channels on youtube.

Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
The brakes on the Ross bike simply could have been crummy brakes. If you have decent quality vintage brakes, it is easy to set them up properly. You can improve braking by (1) quality brake shoes (kool stop makes good ones) and (2) quality housing and cables. Also modern aero levers can help.
Yea. That was my conclusion. It was a crummy brake design. Even if I had the ability to set it to brand new tolerances it would have been inadequate (compared to what we have today). The biggest flaw was the way the line pulled on the brake assembly it would always lead to one side of the pad hitting the wheel first. No matter what you did, it could not (the way it was designed) clamp both at the same time or near the same time. It had to hit one side of the wheel before the other side of the brake assembly could clamp down. This made the hand brake pretty much useless the first 40% of the pull and awfully unlinear to engage. Even when 100% pulled it just didn't stop well. I stopped trying to investigate it after a few hours determining there was nothing I could do to fix it (other than new cables and pads, which still would only bandaid the problem from what I assessed).
CleanClassics is offline  
Old 06-22-21, 02:26 AM
  #32  
Lazyass
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Minas Ithil
Posts: 9,245
Mentioned: 63 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2378 Post(s)
Liked 558 Times in 344 Posts
Originally Posted by CleanClassics View Post
Sorry to hear that, eBay is really the wild west in it's current state. I've been on it since its beanie baby days but since around 2014 onwards it's been hit or miss for me.

Were you able to get a new fork to get er running?
No, it was trash. The down tube was bent.
Lazyass is offline  
Old 06-25-21, 05:05 AM
  #33  
thumpism 
Bikes are okay, I guess.
 
thumpism's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Richmond, Virginia
Posts: 7,661

Bikes: Waterford Paramount Touring, Giant CFM-2, Raleigh Sports 3-speeds in M23 & L23, Schwinn Cimarron oddball build, Marin Palisades Trail dropbar conversion, Nishiki Cresta GT

Mentioned: 54 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2200 Post(s)
Liked 1,133 Times in 830 Posts
Here's a local one.

https://richmond.craigslist.org/bik/...341677010.html

thumpism is offline  
Old 06-25-21, 07:17 AM
  #34  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 26,265
Mentioned: 210 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14832 Post(s)
Liked 2,612 Times in 1,939 Posts
If you are looking for a USA made bicycle, there are literally hundreds of small builders here in the USA working in anything from Carbon Fiber to Titanium to Steel. Even Bamboo.

A lot of welded frames, but some also make lugged frames.

They may not come cheap, but there are some excellent bikes.

I think Portland Oregon has an annual handmade bicycle show.
CliffordK is offline  
Old 06-27-21, 03:27 PM
  #35  
CleanClassics
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2021
Location: United States
Posts: 17
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
I got lucky. I didn't think I'd find another vintage Trek and I was ready to get a new one. But this one popped up locally in very good condition. Pops is back to riding again. He's very happy. The difference we could tell from his is that this one has two tone paint and has 2 front gears instead of 3 in the old one (He seems to prefer the 2 gear, the 3 gear model kept grabbing his jeans). The owner we purchased it from had put a more comfort based seat as the original one (vetta) had degraded. Dad likes it so no point in messing with it for now. Thanks everyone for the help.

CleanClassics is offline  
Likes For CleanClassics:
Old 11-25-21, 02:11 PM
  #36  
Gym123456
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2021
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I joined recently and am a bit surprised to see the number of people who are in the Milwaukee area. The Craig's List 400 in Pewter that's leaning against the tree (Brown Deer, WI) looks almost exactly like mine.
Gym123456 is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.