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How can you figure out whether to restore or not.

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How can you figure out whether to restore or not.

Old 07-16-21, 03:05 PM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by Unlovedwarrior View Post
Do you have bicycle type tools? Ever repaired anything? Actually yea I've been basically repairing a friend's motorized bike for him to exercise my problem solving, thinking out of the box and critical thinking plus I'm able to do normal guy stuff like that and other, I'm not like most guys when it comes to guy stuff but I'm learning. I've been buying new tools as I need them for different projects mainly woodworking and recently stuff for bikes. Surface rust is an easy fix. Deeper rust is more work. Rusty components clean well if you can dis&reassemble. Yea rust removal won't be hard I'm sure I can dis and reassemble it. Whether riding or selling - clean stuff is worth much more. I originally pulled it out to see if it was fixable/ridable, need something until I can afford a fuel pump for 17 Camry. Does the frame fit your size body? Idk I think. Haven't got on it yet it rides in it's current shape had my useless brother test that
You are about to embark on a real learning exercise. For example, you say - "Yea rust removal won't be hard I'm sure I can dis and reassemble it. Whether riding or selling - clean stuff is worth much more."

Apply that theory to the spoke/nipple connection. With rims that badly oxidized, chances are very good that the spokes and nipples will be all but impossible to remove without damaging the nipples. Truing a wheel is not just an exercise in mechanical ability, it is a bit of an art. It takes a basic understanding of how to true and dish and stress a wheel. With that learned, it takes practice to actually do it. However, with patience, anyone can build wheels. But those rims are close to toast, in my mind, hence my suggestion for a junk bike build. And, once the steel rim wheels are built, don't expect them to stop well in wet conditions. My point is...

You will learn a lot with that seventies something Peugeot Mixte and what you learn can be applied to your next bike and the next one after that, in case a case of N+1 sets in. You might also learn that if you are five foot eight, or taller, that the bike does not fit you properly.

Anyway, best of luck with the experiment. Please keep us posted with your progress and do not hesitate to seek help here. The Bike Forums is a great place to share your vintage bicycle interest.

In closing, be prepared to spend $$$. I got this bike for free, did all of my own work, and presently have close to or over $400.00 CND invested in it. Can I sell it for that much? Probably but only by exercising patience. Was the investment of cash, time, blood, sweat and tears worth it? You bet it was...

As found...


Lots of cash, time, blood, sweat and tears later...
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Old 07-16-21, 03:15 PM
  #27  
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I may be in the minority here but I would love to have the OP's bike - a mixte Peugeot of around 1969-71 vintage that appears to be unmolested (even if it appears to be unmaintained).

Paint looks great (well as good as it ever did) and decals are all intact, so no major frame cosmetic issues. Lots of dirt is all. The rims are looking like the most challenging; easy enough to build up new ones though the chrome on those rims might have held up well - try the cheap OA/Aluminum foil tricks to see what is there after you remove the visual distraction of the rust.

Also, I hear the "problem with french parts" discussion all the time - on a bike boom era bike I believe the only "parts issue" you might have is bottom bracket cups. I have a couple of francophone bikes from that era and have not yet run into any kind of issue with "French only" parts....I reused the BB cups to go cotterless at one point on my Pug and had no issues (since reverted to cottered).

I think a lot could be done with liberal application of elbow (and real) grease. If the objective is to flip you might get away with a lot of labour, some brake pads and tires and tubes.....
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Old 07-16-21, 03:37 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by markk900 View Post
I may be in the minority here but I would love to have the OP's bike - a mixte Peugeot of around 1969-71 vintage that appears to be unmolested (even if it appears to be unmaintained).

Paint looks great (well as good as it ever did) and decals are all intact, so no major frame cosmetic issues. Lots of dirt is all. The rims are looking like the most challenging; easy enough to build up new ones though the chrome on those rims might have held up well - try the cheap OA/Aluminum foil tricks to see what is there after you remove the visual distraction of the rust.

Also, I hear the "problem with french parts" discussion all the time - on a bike boom era bike I believe the only "parts issue" you might have is bottom bracket cups. I have a couple of francophone bikes from that era and have not yet run into any kind of issue with "French only" parts....I reused the BB cups to go cotterless at one point on my Pug and had no issues (since reverted to cottered).

I think a lot could be done with liberal application of elbow (and real) grease. If the objective is to flip you might get away with a lot of labour, some brake pads and tires and tubes.....

"Also, I hear the "problem with french parts" discussion all the time - on a bike boom era bike I believe the only "parts issue" you might have is bottom bracket cups." Really, lots of these Simplex front derailleurs have arrived at my door step looking just like this...

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Old 07-16-21, 04:04 PM
  #29  
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Hmmm...

It might be a fun bike to restore... and you don't have to worry about "breaking anything".

Option 1: Sell it on Craigslist/Facebook for somewhere between FREE and $25.

Option 2: Restore it. Spend $150 on parts and supplies. Plus your time. Plus the $25 "value", and you'll end up with a fully restored $100 bicycle!!!
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Old 07-16-21, 04:39 PM
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Originally Posted by randyjawa View Post
"Also, I hear the "problem with french parts" discussion all the time - on a bike boom era bike I believe the only "parts issue" you might have is bottom bracket cups." Really, lots of these Simplex front derailleurs have arrived at my door step looking just like this...
Oh I get that part Randy - sorry I meant much more that people seem to imply that somehow french stuff is harder to work on, harder to get parts for, etc. That to me is not true, but then again I replaced my simplex front derailleur in 1975 with a suntour and its still going strong Which actually makes my point - the basic bikes are fine and you can upgrade them almost infinitely - when I started doing upgrades to my Pug 40 years ago I had no idea about things like seat post diameter etc....I always found something to make it all work.
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Old 07-16-21, 04:49 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by machinist42 View Post
Put the old girl to rest. She's led an interesting life. Cremation or burial may be your best bet.
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Old 07-16-21, 04:55 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by markk900 View Post
Oh I get that part Randy - sorry I meant much more that people seem to imply that somehow french stuff is harder to work on, harder to get parts for, etc. That to me is not true, but then again I replaced my simplex front derailleur in 1975 with a suntour and its still going strong Which actually makes my point - the basic bikes are fine and you can upgrade them almost infinitely - when I started doing upgrades to my Pug 40 years ago I had no idea about things like seat post diameter etc....I always found something to make it all work.
I hear you and fully understand. Sometimes, we at Bike Forums, tend to under sell the problems with fixing up old bikes. I have built a few, over the years, and not one of them has actually been restored. Not one. Restoration is very costly but just getting a bike on the road need not break the bank. That said...

I, too, am a fan of French bikes. When compared to any other country, they are more than competitive in the looks and performance departments. There are, however, issues that would prove troublesome to just about anyone getting into vintage bicycle building for the first time. Heck, I still tend to ask myself if it is worth it and the answer, always, is yes...
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Old 07-18-21, 11:46 PM
  #33  
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One thing I don't think anyone has mentioned yet.
Make sure you catalogue and bag every part that comes of the bike if you restore it. A box of plastic zip lock bags is cheap and taking the time to carefully photograph every part as you take it off the bike and place it in a bag with a slip of paper i.d.ing it will likely save you untold grief later.

There are specialty parts on your bike that you might easily loose that if you do will make reassembly impossible. They are sometimes virtually irreplaceable.
Be especially careful as you do the disassembly not to drop anything on the floor. I am still looking for a wrench I dropped years ago that disappeared into a parallel universe.
I suggest getting an old white sheet and spreading it out under the bike stand as you do the tear down . Hopefully, when you inevitably do drop that tinny Ferrell that you will need later to assemble the brake cables it will fall on the sheet which will keep it from bouncing 6 feet away under a scrap of cardboard on the floor never to be seen for months or years. Seriously, Do this.

Those of us who restore bikes frequently have boxes and bins full of misc. bits and pieces acquired over the years that we fill with random parts we sweep up off the floor so that when something gets lost or the Gremlins hide it from us we can rummage around and find a replacement.
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Old 07-19-21, 12:55 AM
  #34  
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.
From the perspective of someone who has never restored a bike and never intends to restore a bike but has refurbished and flipped dozens...

- Is anything stuck? Check stem and seatpost first, then the cotter pins.

- Are the rims steel and can I refurbish those? What's the braking going to feel and sound like with those rims?

- Find out how much it's going to cost me to refurbish those brake calipers. If I have to buy kool-stops for Mafac, what's the cost?

- Can I overhaul those pedals? Is anything broken inside?

- Check the bb and hubs for anything that looks wack.

Oh, and "refurbish" means fully overhaul everything (even pedals), polish everything, and add new consumables everywhere ... or, in the least, where necessary.

I agree with the other poster that the paint looks really, really good. So, there's a great starting point here.
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Old 07-19-21, 05:13 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by Wileyone View Post
Put the old girl to rest. She's led an interesting life. Cremation or burial may be your best bet.
I've saved far worse. I suspect it's only real issue is the surface rust on the chrome. A few hours with some tasty tunes, your favorite beverages, some elbow grease, rags and polish and that little jewel could shine again.
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Old 07-22-21, 11:20 AM
  #36  
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don't be afraid of French restorations

Originally Posted by Unlovedwarrior View Post
How do you know what to do with a possible vintage frenchy. Sell as is restore then sell part it out or just toss it out?
Just sold this last week for $295. Had 2 buyers willing to drive some distance for it, and the one that missed out was very disappointed. I mainly do mixtes because I love them, and the bonus is that they are easy to sell because buyers love them. This same model was my first restoration and I've restored and sold a dozen+ by now, ranging $150-$340 based on condition and the amount of work and $$ I put into them. Don't be put off by the French idiosyncrasies. It's rare you can't reuse the various French-threaded parts: BB cups, headset, pedals. One thing to look out for is the French stem. It has a 22.0mm diameter (into the headtube) and 25.0mm diameter bar clamp. Both are problematic if you try to use a 25.4mm bar with the French stem, or try to put a standard stem into the French headtube (in that case you can file it down to 22.0).





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Old 07-22-21, 11:51 AM
  #37  
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I bought that bike!

Originally Posted by capnjonny View Post
I always look at the paint. The bike may be dirty but if the paint underneath is in good condition it will make any restoration easier. also if the paint is in good shape the bike will probably not have been ridden as much. You can get a beautiful result by deep cleaning the frame , rubbing out with white polishing compound , then either waxing or, like I often do, clear coating with Rustoleum Automotive clear. (warning, never spray this over fresh paint. Disaster lurks as it will alligator the finish if the paint is not THOUROUGHLY dry).

Also check to be sure the seat post and stem aren't stuck. that can be a show stopper. Beware of heliomatic rear freewheels. best to just replace the wheel rather than mess with them. Heavily rusted bike - stay away. wheels with severe hop in rim - look for new wheel. cotteed crank - you better have access to a cotter press.

Old French bikes in particular can have compatibility issues. They can usually be bought cheap though so buying a parts bike might be a good idea.

When things work out though you might just end up with something like this 1962 Pug I restored for the Bike Exchange a few years ago.

haha, I bought that bike!!! I saw it at a bikex sale and took a picture to show my nephew in LA. Partly because he is tall(!) and partly because he had expressed a desire to restore the AO-8 I started him out on. Subsequently, he really got into bikes and built a few Surly's, but also thought he might want to restore his Peugeot with vintage parts someday. So I send him the pic and he replies "purple is my favorite color!" So I called up bikex and bought it post-sale. I kept saying (to whomever, can't remember, but one of the founders I believe) I couldn't believe the quality of the restoration. And the bikex guy was quite casual about it like, no big deal, this is what we do. But I gotta say, after restoring so many vintage bikes, especially French, that this beauty was special, and restored with great attention to detail. My nephew was thrilled when he drove up from LA for pickup.

Here I am, at bikex's former Leghorn location, with receipt in hand.
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Old 07-23-21, 01:13 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by Unlovedwarrior View Post
How do you know what to do with a possible vintage frenchy. Sell as is restore then sell part it out or just toss it out?
If id like to ride it i restore. If not i dont buy it in the first place.
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Old 07-23-21, 05:49 AM
  #39  
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Unlovedwarrior ,
From your posts, I'm guessing that you don't have the tools or experience to take this on. But here's what I'd do with the subject bike. Overall strategy: part out the things of value, discard the rest.

Things of value:
1) frame/seatpost binder bolt/headset/fork - after disassembling everything and removing [them] from the frame, these items will have the most value. Clean up the binder bolt and headset components/bearings as best you can with a light penetrant and brass wire wheel. You can probably get $75 for them [clean polished frame and fork, headset, binder bolt] in most any market. Maybe keep the seatpost, too, as an example diameter for the purchaser to replace. Or, measure that diameter and record.
2) hubs - you'll need a freewheel remover tool (take to bike shop if you don't want to buy the tool), and have to get that freewheel off of the rear hub. Then you can simply cut all of the spokes and discard the spokes and rims. Those Simplex hubs will fetch $40-60 on eBay, once re-greased, polished, and skewers de-rusted, lubricated and shined up. Drip lubrication through the bearing seams in the freewheel and go over the cogs with a penetrant and soft brush. There may be some value there, depending. An additional $20 on eBay, maybe more.
3) brake calipers - disassemble, clean and hand polish the parts, re-assemble and lubricate. Discard the rubber pad inserts, but shine up the pad holders. Make certain to keep the straddle yolk, straddle cable, as well as front and rear center cable stops. Sell as a group for $30.
4) grips - these may have some value depending on branding and condition - I can't tell from the photo. Do your research.

Donate: bars and stem, brake levers. Keep the inner tubes.

The rest can go to a metal recycler.

There you go. A plan forward. PG
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Old 07-23-21, 09:58 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by sunburst View Post
Just sold this last week for $295. Had 2 buyers willing to drive some distance for it, and the one that missed out was very disappointed. I mainly do mixtes because I love them, and the bonus is that they are easy to sell because buyers love them. This same model was my first restoration and I've restored and sold a dozen+ by now, ranging $150-$340 based on condition and the amount of work and $$ I put into them. Don't be put off by the French idiosyncrasies. It's rare you can't reuse the various French-threaded parts: BB cups, headset, pedals. One thing to look out for is the French stem. It has a 22.0mm diameter (into the headtube) and 25.0mm diameter bar clamp. Both are problematic if you try to use a 25.4mm bar with the French stem, or try to put a standard stem into the French headtube (in that case you can file it down to 22.0).
I gather you sell on CL?
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Old 07-24-21, 05:28 PM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by Korina View Post
I gather you sell on CL?
yes, craigslist mostly, but I've started using Facebook Marketplace also. I sold a Univega Gran Turismo there last week. And when I'm desperate I'll even post on Nextdoor. My impression from responses (and extended interactions) is that people trust Facebook and Nextdoor more than craigslist

I'll be posting a Motobecane Mixte on at least the first two tomorrow.
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Old 07-24-21, 05:31 PM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by Phil_gretz View Post
Unlovedwarrior ,
Those Simplex hubs will fetch $40-60 on eBay, once re-greased, polished, and skewers de-rusted, lubricated and shined up.
Each, or a pair?
Damn, I've probably thrown away some of those because of spoke and rim condition.
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Old 07-26-21, 06:22 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by sunburst View Post
yes, craigslist mostly, but I've started using Facebook Marketplace also. I sold a Univega Gran Turismo there last week. And when I'm desperate I'll even post on Nextdoor. My impression from responses (and extended interactions) is that people trust Facebook and Nextdoor more than craigslist

I'll be posting a Motobecane Mixte on at least the first two tomorrow.
Cool. I've been on the lookout for a unicorn, which I'm told doesn't exist, or at least a one-horned goat. So to speak. Ideally it would be a 26"-wheel mixte (for my short legs) that I can put some mtb. gearing on (old short legs, and so many hills). Barring that, one that can take 650b and wide-ish tires for our terrible roads.

Does such a beastie exist?
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Old 07-26-21, 10:49 PM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by Korina View Post
Cool. I've been on the lookout for a unicorn, which I'm told doesn't exist, or at least a one-horned goat. So to speak. Ideally it would be a 26"-wheel mixte (for my short legs) that I can put some mtb. gearing on (old short legs, and so many hills). Barring that, one that can take 650b and wide-ish tires for our terrible roads.

Does such a beastie exist?
I haven't heard, but I have seen quite a variation in seatpost lengths in mixte frames with 27" wheels. I think the shortest I've found was 50cm. The Moto I'm selling is 55cm, as a comparison. And I'm keeping two 56cm Peugeots for myself. I've seen 52cm the most. Anyway, I fit a very short woman to a 50cm off-brand Japanese mixte and I even had to change to a low profile saddle to eke out a few extra mm, but I made it work.

Btw, I changed the tires this morning on the Moto prior to listing because a friend in SF may be interested and the roads can be pretty bad up there. These Continental Utrasports are the biggest honking 27 1/4" tires I have ever seen, by a big margin, so you might want to keep those in mind.





Checkout this Nishiki for gearing. Although I'm primarily a Francophile with mixtes this is the best mixte I've ever restored. It's light and solid with a cromoly frame. I had it for years before noticing the low BCD which supports a 34T chainring. I paired that with a 6-speed freewheel with a low of 34T. Like the above tires, this also was in deference to the hills of San Francisco. I gave this one to a (good!) friend but would replace it in a heartbeat if I could find another like it in need of restoration. This is a 52cm.

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Old 07-27-21, 01:00 AM
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Originally Posted by sunburst View Post
I haven't heard, but I have seen quite a variation in seatpost lengths in mixte frames with 27" wheels. I think the shortest I've found was 50cm. The Moto I'm selling is 55cm, as a comparison. And I'm keeping two 56cm Peugeots for myself. I've seen 52cm the most. Anyway, I fit a very short woman to a 50cm off-brand Japanese mixte and I even had to change to a low profile saddle to eke out a few extra mm, but I made it work.

Btw, I changed the tires this morning on the Moto prior to listing because a friend in SF may be interested and the roads can be pretty bad up there. These Continental Utrasports are the biggest honking 27 1/4" tires I have ever seen, by a big margin, so you might want to keep those in mind.

Checkout this Nishiki for gearing. Although I'm primarily a Francophile with mixtes this is the best mixte I've ever restored. It's light and solid with a cromoly frame. I had it for years before noticing the low BCD which supports a 34T chainring. I paired that with a 6-speed freewheel with a low of 34T. Like the above tires, this also was in deference to the hills of San Francisco. I gave this one to a (good!) friend but would replace it in a heartbeat if I could find another like it in need of restoration. This is a 52cm.
🤤 What model is that pretty, pretty Nishiki? So I know what to look for.
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Old 07-27-21, 10:36 AM
  #46  
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Nishiki

Originally Posted by Korina View Post
🤤 What model is that pretty, pretty Nishiki? So I know what to look for.
You can see the model name decal is worn away. I saved the serial number so I will dig it out, try to determine the year, then find a catalog for that year. I'm guessing they would have only one cromoly mixte model in a given year. I bought this as a frame and a box of parts, saving it from a fixie conversion. 😁
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Old 07-27-21, 10:50 AM
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I can vouch for early 1970s Peugeot AO8, UO8, UO18, UE8, UE18 being great general purpose road bikes. The frames are much better than the components, so most of these can benefit from Japanese drivetrains and aluminum cranks and rims. (Been there ... done that.)

My UO-8 with barcon cables routed between the rack and the cylindrical Bellwether front bag.
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Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
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Old 07-27-21, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by sunburst View Post
You can see the model name decal is worn away. I saved the serial number so I will dig it out, try to determine the year, then find a catalog for that year. I'm guessing they would have only one cromoly mixte model in a given year. I bought this as a frame and a box of parts, saving it from a fixie conversion. 😁
Thank you for your service to C&V; turning that beauty into a fixie would have been a crime.

I really appreciate you taking the time to find the bike for me. If I may ask, what name do you use on CL? I'm way north of you, but for the right bike (and a trip to TJ's) we might be willing to make the drive.
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Old 07-29-21, 04:41 PM
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name on cl?

Originally Posted by Korina View Post
Thank you for your service to C&V; turning that beauty into a fixie would have been a crime.

I really appreciate you taking the time to find the bike for me. If I may ask, what name do you use on CL? I'm way north of you, but for the right bike (and a trip to TJ's) we might be willing to make the drive.
My handle is "bluesjr". can you search for ads using that!?
Anyway, T-Mar on the Nishiki serial # thread says it is Royale or Olympic 12. I'm guessing Royale from what I can see of that decal.
Just listed this one Motobecane today.

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Old 07-30-21, 01:06 AM
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Open your wallet and check inside.
Also if you have to ask you may already have your answer. A project like that takes time, patience, passion, etc.
Did I mention open your wallet and check inside ?
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