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Sport Tourer hall of fame

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Sport Tourer hall of fame

Old 07-20-21, 07:10 PM
  #26  
USAZorro
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Originally Posted by ShannonM View Post
Rack trunk & small panniers / fold-up combo unit or medium saddlebag out back, plus a reasonably-sized handlebar bag seems just right to me.

Probably because that's what I've got on my Fuji. Topeak folding-pannier trunk and a Roswheel three-velcro-strap bag on the bars.

--Shannon

PS: While my League Fuji is a great sport-touring bike, it's not HoF-worthy. If they'd made a bike with the 9658 tubeset from the Team and the Club / League geometry, that bike would be a strong contender for inclusion... the 1769 pipes are a teeny bit too heavy and stiff for perfection.
Nothing against your Fuji. I have a 1972 Finest, and it's an awesome ride.. My personal opinion is that once you've moved beyond a rando bag in the front and a seat bag in the back, you've entered "touring" territory.
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Old 07-20-21, 09:11 PM
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Originally Posted by icepick_trotsky View Post
What are your picks for the all time great sport touring frames? I'm (very casually) thinking about a new project in this vein. In the past, I've owned a Trek 600 (great but too big) and a Specialized Sequioa (also great but too big). The Specialized was Miyata made and really stuck out to me and I would definitely snap up another if I could find one.
What size frame works best for you? I have a 56cm '82 Sequoia that I should probably let go.
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Old 07-20-21, 09:22 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by USAZorro View Post
Nothing against your Fuji. I have a 1972 Finest, and it's an awesome ride.. My personal opinion is that once you've moved beyond a rando bag in the front and a seat bag in the back, you've entered "touring" territory.
Yeah, handlebar bag + seat bag = credit card tourer
Add panniers, sleeping bag, tent and cooking gear, call it a pure tourer.

Just my opinion.
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Old 07-20-21, 10:12 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by USAZorro View Post
My personal opinion is that once you've moved beyond a rando bag in the front and a seat bag in the back, you've entered "touring" territory.
By "rando bag", do you mean the big, boxy, beautiful French-style bags with small front rack and decaleur?

Comparing rack trunk + small handlebar bag to big handlebar bag + seat wedge, storage space and number of racks are about the same, I'd think. There seems to be a difference in handling, but also people seem to prefer one or the other and I doubt anyone could predict which one they like better until they've ridden both... and I haven't, so take that for what it's worth. Aesthetically, though the bags are gorgeous, the big front / small rear setup has always looked unbalanced to my eye. Oddly, the reverse, big rear / no front, doesn't push my asymmetry button much at all.

To me, there's a (small) distinction between "sport-touring bike" and "French-style rando bike".

I guess I wanna say, "siblings, not twins."

--Shannon

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Old 07-20-21, 11:15 PM
  #30  
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Austro Daimler called a series of bikes "fast touring".
Vent Noir and Olympian used 531 butted tubing, 73* head angle, single set of eyelets at dropouts&forkends

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Old 07-21-21, 12:57 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by ShannonM View Post
By "rando bag", do you mean the big, boxy, beautiful French-style bags with small front rack and decaleur?

Comparing rack trunk + small handlebar bag to big handlebar bag + seat wedge, storage space and number of racks are about the same, I'd think. There seems to be a difference in handling, but also people seem to prefer one or the other and I doubt anyone could predict which one they like better until they've ridden both... and I haven't, so take that for what it's worth. Aesthetically, though the bags are gorgeous, the big front / small rear setup has always looked unbalanced to my eye. Oddly, the reverse, big rear / no front, doesn't push my asymmetry button much at all.

To me, there's a (small) distinction between "sport-touring bike" and "French-style rando bike".

I guess I wanna say, "siblings, not twins."

--Shannon
I have one of each, the red ‘87 SLX Marinoni posted above in #14 that always has a large seat-post rear bag (about 7.5 l capacity), and the rando-bagged ‘79 Miyata 912 below with Gugificazione! magic. I love them both. The Marinoni gets more mileage, but the Miyata is more versatile.

Mark G. used his fork re-raking expertise (and much more) on the stock Miyata fork so that the bikes handle quite similarly with comparable loads. But it is worth noting that with the now-low trail fork, which is vital for a front-loaded bike, it can easily handle large variations in load, from an empty bag to full with packed front panniers with no appreciable change in steering or handling. I was amazed when I first tried it with full panniers.

Miyata 912 with Gugificazione!
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Old 07-21-21, 01:15 AM
  #32  
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Here's my recently acquired 1982 Lotus Classique. Tange Champion #2 tubing, built by Tsunoda. Shimano 600 Arabesque groupset with a long cage derailleur and 13-32 6-speed cassette.

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Old 07-21-21, 01:33 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by icepick_trotsky View Post
You know, when I saw the title of this thread the first bike that came to mind was my Sequoia, but I see it was already here.

It fits me perfectly, BTW.

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Old 07-21-21, 05:25 AM
  #34  
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I’m going to throw this Miyata 610 on the list, picked it up last night for $90. Not my first, but definitely the least I’ve paid for one. I’m still amazed that such high quality bikes can still be bought for so little money.
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Old 07-21-21, 06:31 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by USAZorro View Post
My personal opinion is that once you've moved beyond a rando bag in the front and a seat bag in the back, you've entered "touring" territory.
I picked up a too big Fuji America recently that came with a set of small Cannondale front panniers on a Blackburn lowrider rack. I'd say the volume of the bags is comparable to a rando bag and saddle bag combo. The first owner had gone one way across country with it. The second owner put a couple hundred miles on it. I didn't see any evidence of a rear rack or handle bar yoke mounted. One of the panniers has a "Bicycle Tours USA" patch on it, which may been a supported tour, but that's out of my generational radar. Its only one bit of the historical record, but performance wise putting everything in a set of small front panniers is an advantage over the handlebar bag seat bag combo, particularly if you don't have a low trail bike. Of course that's all sorts of inconvenient compared a handlebar bag for tooling around day rides. Apologies for the thread drift.
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Old 07-21-21, 07:12 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by nlerner View Post
I've always thought of the Fuji S12-S as the ultimate sports tourer. One of the ones I had I set up with 650B x 38mm wheels.
I was aware of the S12-S reputation when I found mine, and I was not disappointed. I have the LTD version, which is a step closer the the America. It was originally black, but I wanted something more like Fuji's Rainbow Blue.


1981 Fuji S12-S LTD
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Old 07-21-21, 07:59 AM
  #37  
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Also a fan of what the Internationals have going on.


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Old 07-21-21, 08:19 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by Insidious C. View Post
What size frame works best for you? I have a 56cm '82 Sequoia that I should probably let go.
If you're in the market to sell, I'm interested if the OP passes. Feel free to PM me a price.
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Old 07-21-21, 08:21 AM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by gugie View Post
Yeah, handlebar bag + seat bag = credit card tourer
Add panniers, sleeping bag, tent and cooking gear, call it a pure tourer.

Just my opinion.
Yeah, I wonder how much it's a form vs. function distinction. For instance, lots of people have done loaded touring on bikes not OEM equipped for such us, and plenty ride dedicated tourers (e.g., Surly LHT) on weekend fast fifties. And then there are bikes designed to be "all-rounders," straddling a bunch of classifications. A contemporary version of that is my Black Mountain Cycles Road.

I've used it for bikepacking:
PA/NJ/NY bikepacking your

Credit-card touring:
Untitled

And weekend fast fifties:
Untitled
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Old 07-21-21, 09:24 AM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by nlerner View Post
Uh, drive side QR? You put it on that side when you think no one's looking?
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Old 07-21-21, 09:26 AM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by gugie View Post
Uh, drive side QR? You put it on that side when you think no one's looking?
Hey, trying to start a new trend! We all can't be influencers.
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Old 07-21-21, 09:47 AM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by Andy_K View Post
You know, when I saw the title of this thread the first bike that came to mind was my Sequoia, but I see it was already here.

It fits me perfectly, BTW.

Glad to see it getting some miles!
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Old 07-21-21, 10:23 AM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by nlerner View Post
Yeah, I wonder how much it's a form vs. function distinction. For instance, lots of people have done loaded touring on bikes not OEM equipped for such us, and plenty ride dedicated tourers (e.g., Surly LHT) on weekend fast fifties. And then there are bikes designed to be "all-rounders," straddling a bunch of classifications. A contemporary version of that is my Black Mountain Cycles Road.

I've used it for bikepacking:
PA/NJ/NY bikepacking your

Credit-card touring:
Untitled

And weekend fast fifties:
Untitled
The bicycle says, "I'm home! I'm home!"
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Old 07-21-21, 10:25 AM
  #44  
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I've read that some consider the Sequoia the best production sports tourer ever made.

@Andy_K says it's his 7-iron, the only truly safe club in his bag.

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Old 07-21-21, 10:54 AM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by gugie View Post
I've read that some consider the Sequoia the best production sports tourer ever made.

@Andy_K says it's his 7-iron, the only truly safe club in his bag.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rVfIhrHTs5M
One of my riding buddies set up his Sequoia with 650b x 42mm wheels plus fenders. No frame mods needed.

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Old 07-21-21, 11:11 AM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by nlerner View Post
One of my riding buddies set up his Sequoia with 650b x 42mm wheels plus fenders. No frame mods needed.
I had mine setup like that for a while.



I moved back to 700c when I built my 650B Grand Jubilé, but I've got a spare set of 650B wheels now. I may go back to that configuration some day.

Mine required a bit of extra drop for the rear brake, even with the long reach Tektros.

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Old 07-21-21, 05:45 PM
  #47  
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This “Hall of Fame” seems to feature volume-built bikes. No excuses are needed, except perhaps for mine that are anything but.

But I’m surprised no owner of a French randonnuese (spelling?) has posted, nor one of the fine more recent US versions such as J. P. Weigle, Mark Nobillette, M.A.P., Jeff Lyon/L’Avecaise, and so forth. Seems to me that the French really pioneered and developed the sport touring bike back in the 30’s-70’s, and those Americans are continuing a very worthy pursuit.

We should acknowledge @gugie’s contributions. I guess I touched on that earlier, and his variations on the Raleigh Gran(d) Sport(s), “Big Red” and many more in other’s hands deserve visibility in this HoF.

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Old 07-21-21, 06:55 PM
  #48  
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Well I of course put this in the other sport tourer thread and had resisted putting it here but now think I will.

EDIT- turns out it went in the top of the line thread.

As indicated many times, it was built for Paris-Brest-Paris but not taken for being a bit small, pretty sure that ride is the epitome of sports touring so.....

Here it is again.



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Old 07-21-21, 07:21 PM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by Dfrost View Post
This “Hall of Fame” seems to feature volume-built bikes. No excuses are needed, except perhaps for mine that are anything but.

But I’m surprised no owner of a French randonnuese (spelling?) has posted, nor one of the fine more recent US versions such as J. P. Weigle, Mark Nobillette, M.A.P., Jeff Lyon/L’Avecaise, and so forth. Seems to me that the French really pioneered and developed the sport touring bike back in the 30’s-70’s, and those Americans are continuing a very worthy pursuit.

We should acknowledge @gugie’s contributions. I guess I touched on that earlier, and his variations on the Raleigh Gran(d) Sport(s), “Big Red” and many more in other’s hands deserve visibility in this HoF.
I'm flattered!

@Andy_K is my publicist, I need to acknowledge you as my P.R. person. Man, payroll is going to be upset...
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Old 07-21-21, 09:14 PM
  #50  
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Originally Posted by Dfrost View Post
This “Hall of Fame” seems to feature volume-built bikes. No excuses are needed, except perhaps for mine that are anything but.

But I’m surprised no owner of a French randonnuese (spelling?) has posted, nor one of the fine more recent US versions such as J. P. Weigle, Mark Nobillette, M.A.P., Jeff Lyon/L’Avecaise, and so forth. Seems to me that the French really pioneered and developed the sport touring bike back in the 30’s-70’s, and those Americans are continuing a very worthy pursuit.

We should acknowledge @gugie’s contributions. I guess I touched on that earlier, and his variations on the Raleigh Gran(d) Sport(s), “Big Red” and many more in other’s hands deserve visibility in this HoF.
...and let's not forget builders from "across the pond" who were inspired by the French constructeurs. My Jack Taylor Tour of Britain, while called a road racing bike, is pure randonneuse: 17.5" chainstays, 73 deg head angle with 2.5" of rake, and tons of clearance (except between the chainstays). The only hitch is there aren't many of them out there. In 1978 (the year mine was built), the Taylor brothers made 170 frames. TOTAL. That includes tandems and various other models of singles. It took me 40 years to find mine. (Sorry, no pics. Yet.)
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