Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

A Little Disappointed with DT Friction Shifting - Ideas for Improvement?

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

A Little Disappointed with DT Friction Shifting - Ideas for Improvement?

Old 08-11-21, 11:07 AM
  #1  
Harold74
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: Calgary, AB Canada
Posts: 197

Bikes: 1992 Miyata 1000, 1997 Trek 730, 2001 Airborne Zeppelin, 1980+ Nishiki Olympic

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 121 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 19 Posts
A Little Disappointed with DT Friction Shifting - Ideas for Improvement?

So my friction shifting resume looks like this:

1) Last summer, I rebuilt a 1997 Trek 730 and did it up with friction stem shifter for sport. This setup feels great to me: responsive and solid.

2) Last month, I rebuilt a 1986 Miyata 210 with Shimano downtube friction shifters. They're nice and make little clicky noises. This setup feels... meh to me. Kinda "spongy".

3) Last week, I rebuilt a 1983 Nishiki Olympic with Suntour Power Ratchet downtube friction shifters. This setup feels cheap and very spongy to me.

Given that I love the friction shifting on my Trek, I really expected to love it on these other bikes, perhaps even more. When you read about friction DT shifting, its fans often comment on how good it feels owing to the short cable runs and minimal housing. That's not how it feels to me though.

So my questions are these:

1) Do I need to adjust my expectations of friction shifting downwards?

2) Is there anything that I might do to improve my setup?

3) Would high end cables help? All three bikes got some cheapo cables from the developing world. I expected that friction shifting would be fairly insensitive to cable quality and nice cables would cost almost as much as I paid for these bikes.

4) The only explanation that I can come up with for why the Trek feels good to me and the older bikes don't is that, perhaps, the more modern derailleur offers less shifting resistance and that tends to make the shifting experience feel more "positive"? Is this what is meant when derailleurs are sometimes described as having "light action"? With the older bikes, shifting feels kind of like trying to reel in a big fish with a lot of line out...


Trek

Miyata

Nishiki

Last edited by Harold74; 08-11-21 at 11:11 AM.
Harold74 is offline  
Old 08-11-21, 11:18 AM
  #2  
noobinsf 
Senior Member
 
noobinsf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 2,707

Bikes: '82 Univega Competizione, '72 Motobecane Grand Record, '83 Mercian KOM Touring, '85 Univega Alpina Uno, '76 Eisentraut Limited

Mentioned: 50 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 852 Post(s)
Liked 677 Times in 445 Posts
There are folks here who will offer detailed and specific advice (and are much more qualified than I am to do so), but the short answer is that all of those things and more can affect how a drivetrain feels -- cable and housing quality, derailleur design, shifter design, freewheel/cassette tooth profiles, chain design, chain length, wear to individual components...
noobinsf is offline  
Old 08-11-21, 11:43 AM
  #3  
juvela
Senior Member
 
juvela's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Alta California
Posts: 11,243
Mentioned: 312 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2672 Post(s)
Liked 1,059 Times in 806 Posts
-----

one type you might wish to explore, if you have not done so already, are the Retrofriction shift levers from Lucien Juy (Simplex)

catalogue page of 1974 -

​​​​​​

many members find these most pleasing...

-----
juvela is online now  
Likes For juvela:
Old 08-11-21, 11:51 AM
  #4  
Harold74
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: Calgary, AB Canada
Posts: 197

Bikes: 1992 Miyata 1000, 1997 Trek 730, 2001 Airborne Zeppelin, 1980+ Nishiki Olympic

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 121 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 19 Posts
Thanks for the comments guys. For what it's worth, all three of my bikes:

1) Have new chains.

2) Have new cassettes / freewheels with teeth that are ramped, pinned etc.

3) Feel good as far as the actual gear changes go. Things dance around in spritely fashion as they should. My issues seem to occur between my hand and the guide jockey wheel. Or, at the least, that's my perception of it to date.
Harold74 is offline  
Old 08-11-21, 11:58 AM
  #5  
Harold74
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: Calgary, AB Canada
Posts: 197

Bikes: 1992 Miyata 1000, 1997 Trek 730, 2001 Airborne Zeppelin, 1980+ Nishiki Olympic

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 121 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 19 Posts
Originally Posted by onyerleft View Post
Take your bike to a shop for an expert opinion, all we can do online is make an educated guess.
I appreciate the input but I'll not be taking any of these bikes to the bike shop for expert opinions. None of them is of a high enough value to justify that in my opinion and, more importantly, all of these bikes are meant to be personal project bikes. If I can't improve the feel of the friction shifters myself, with the help of this community, I'll do one of the following:

1) live with what I've got.

2) tinker endlessly.

3) divest myself of the bikes.

Educated guesses are precisely what I seek here.
Harold74 is offline  
Likes For Harold74:
Old 08-11-21, 12:03 PM
  #6  
clubman 
Youngman Grand
 
clubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 7,709

Bikes: roadsters, club bikes, fixed and classic

Mentioned: 107 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1882 Post(s)
Liked 1,046 Times in 702 Posts
Three words...Suntour Power Shifters.

Available for any configuration, including stem shifters. Do an image search.

Whoops, I didn't scroll down below the Trek.

Well, they may feel cheap and spongy but that could be cables, housing or personal preference. When set up correctly, they don't slip. And they last.

And I would say yourrear loop on the Nishiki is big and combined with cheap housing, may be part of the problem.

Last edited by clubman; 08-11-21 at 12:12 PM.
clubman is offline  
Likes For clubman:
Old 08-11-21, 12:07 PM
  #7  
noobinsf 
Senior Member
 
noobinsf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 2,707

Bikes: '82 Univega Competizione, '72 Motobecane Grand Record, '83 Mercian KOM Touring, '85 Univega Alpina Uno, '76 Eisentraut Limited

Mentioned: 50 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 852 Post(s)
Liked 677 Times in 445 Posts
I can't really make out what you have as a rear derailleur on the Miyata, but on the Nishiki, it looks like a Suntour ARx, which is okay, but not the best Suntour has to offer. If you can find a Cyclone, Vx, V-GT, or BL, give one of those a try. I have a Cyclone on one bike with a modern ramped cassette, Suntour Symmetric shifters, and cheap cables/housing, and shifting has always been crisp, light, and precise. Also be sure to check droupout and derailleur hanger alignment. As a comparison, I had an older Suntour GT matched with a Suntour freewheel on a different bike, and while it was reliable, it always needed overshifting.
noobinsf is offline  
Likes For noobinsf:
Old 08-11-21, 12:12 PM
  #8  
SJX426 
Senior Member
 
SJX426's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Fredericksburg, Va
Posts: 8,240

Bikes: '73 Bottecchia Giro d'Italia, '83 Colnago Superissimo, '84 Trek 610, '84 Trek 760, '88 Pinarello Veneto, '88 De Rosa Pro, '89 Pinarello Montello, '94 Burley Duet, 97 Specialized RockHopper, 2010 Langster, Tern Link D8

Mentioned: 61 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1126 Post(s)
Liked 913 Times in 540 Posts
"SPONGY" is of interest to me in your description. My interpretation is that the cable has flex in combination with resistance. Is the housing to the RD specific shifting housing? Don't use the spiral wound housing for shift cables.

Are the ends square with the stop? I always cut the ends with the housing in the final curved position to ensure the housing wires are the correct length when in that position. They should not be cut while the housing is in the straight position because you can get compression movement as some are compressed and other are not touching the stop.

Are the cables as tight as they can be with the derailleur in its relaxed adjusted position?
__________________
Bikes don't stand alone. They are two tired.
SJX426 is offline  
Old 08-11-21, 12:24 PM
  #9  
canopus 
Senior Member
 
canopus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Kingwood, TX
Posts: 1,538

Bikes: Road, Touring, BMX, Cruisers...

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 116 Post(s)
Liked 141 Times in 88 Posts
Friction shifting "feel" is most definitely dependent on cables. Good stainless thick cables and firm outer housing that is lined makes a world of difference. Derailleur spring, cleanliness, lubrication and the play in the pivot joints make a difference.
Up to seven speeds is good. 8 and up gets touchy so practice makes perfect. Personally I love my indexed DT 10Sp Campy shifting.
Ramped freewheel or cassette can assist shifts.
Derailleur hanger alignment makes a huge difference also.

Ultimately it will come down to feel, and that just requires a lot of riding and shifting to get the feel of where to place the lever for your speed and cadence.

ps - Jockey wheel play can make a difference also in the feel and needing to overshift and trim.
__________________
1984 Cannondale ST
1985 Cannondale SR300
1980 Gary Littlejohn Cruiser
1984 Trek 760
1981 Trek 710
Pics

Last edited by canopus; 08-11-21 at 12:33 PM.
canopus is offline  
Old 08-11-21, 12:30 PM
  #10  
masi61
Senior Member
 
masi61's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 3,055

Bikes: Puch Marco Polo, Saint Tropez, Masi Gran Criterium

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 811 Post(s)
Liked 218 Times in 155 Posts
Originally Posted by clubman View Post
Three words...Suntour Power Shifters.

Available for any configuration, including stem shifters. Do an image search.

Whoops, I didn't scroll down below the Trek.

Well, they may feel cheap and spongy but that could be cables, housing or personal preference. When set up correctly, they don't slip. And they last.

And I would say yourrear loop on the Nishiki is big and combined with cheap housing, may be part of the problem.
Having a generous rear loop is a pretty good idea but I think you could remove a bit of the loop and still be fine. Also It is a good idea to use index ready "compressionless" housing for derailleur housing, it has much crisper action. BTW, no one mentioned the adjuster screw that changes where the upper jockey pulley rests with respect to the smallest freewheel cog. I believe this is called the "B" adjuster (please correct me if I'm wrong here, B-adjuster doesn't sound right). By tightening this up you can get quicker shifts on the tighter cogs, just don't over do it because you still want crisp shifting in the big cogs.
masi61 is offline  
Likes For masi61:
Old 08-11-21, 12:30 PM
  #11  
rccardr 
aka: Dr. Cannondale
 
rccardr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 6,624

Bikes: Lots. Just...lots.

Mentioned: 187 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1585 Post(s)
Liked 1,054 Times in 500 Posts
^^This.
Plus, the housing loop for the RD is way too long on each bike. Should be just long enough to make a smooth curve, that’s usually around a foot long.
Quality housing and quality cables make a huge difference. I give away zinc coated cables and use only premium Shimano stainless drawn cables and Jagwire housing for both brakes and shifters. That’s a bike-lifetime investment.
Better RD’s result in better shifting, just like your ramped and pinned chainrings. Even the cheapest Shimano 105 RD made after 1987 will give you outstanding shifting quality.
__________________
Hard at work in the Secret Underground Laboratory...
rccardr is offline  
Old 08-11-21, 12:36 PM
  #12  
jamesdak 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Utah
Posts: 7,109

Bikes: Paletti,De Rosa Neo Pro,Pinarello Monviso,Duell Vienna,Giordana XL Super(2)Lemond Maillot Juane (2) & custom & Versailles,PDG Paramount,Serotta CSI,Fuji Opus III,Davidson Impulse,Pashley Guv'nor,Evans,Fishlips,Jan De Reus,Prologue TT,Y-Foil,Softride

Mentioned: 126 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1782 Post(s)
Liked 1,505 Times in 740 Posts
Yep, as others are saying. Good modern cables and housing go a long way towards improving feel. Make sure your RD pullers are good too. It's a system so getting every part of it the best you can helps. Case in point an old Campagnolo Victory setup on a bike I worked over this past year. It was balky, heavy feeling, and imprecise when I got it. Had to overshift and then trim back each gear change. I took it all apart, fully serviced and lubed the RD, replaced the pulleys that had to much play, new modern cables and housing. I also took apart the DT shifters and fully cleaned and serviced them also, going as fair as polishing the inside of the barrel sections and such. When I reassembled it all everything was night and day. What had been my worse function friction setup ever now equaled the best I've ever had. Light touch, precise shifting, no trimming, etc. Oh and I did swap the rear wheel from an old 6 speed freewheel setup to a modern freehub with an 8 speed cassette. So, tighter gears with better shift capability that showed in operation.
__________________
Steel is real...and comfy.
jamesdak is offline  
Likes For jamesdak:
Old 08-11-21, 12:48 PM
  #13  
ThermionicScott 
working on my sandal tan
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 21,206

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers), All-City Space Horse (hers)

Mentioned: 95 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3228 Post(s)
Liked 1,373 Times in 926 Posts
I can't speak to SunTour power ratchet shifters, but sometimes my Shimano downtube shifters get a little dry, and so they get noisier and seem to have more resistance. When that happens, I'll take off the mounting bolt and squirt a little WD-40 in there. That quiets them down and makes them feel nice again.
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is offline  
Old 08-11-21, 01:59 PM
  #14  
clubman 
Youngman Grand
 
clubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 7,709

Bikes: roadsters, club bikes, fixed and classic

Mentioned: 107 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1882 Post(s)
Liked 1,046 Times in 702 Posts
One last thing not mentioned...ferrules.
clubman is offline  
Likes For clubman:
Old 08-11-21, 02:03 PM
  #15  
cb400bill
Forum Moderator
 
cb400bill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Kalamazoo MI
Posts: 19,890

Bikes: Fuji SL2.1 Carbon Di2 Cannondale Synapse Alloy 4 Trek Checkpoint ALR gravel Viscount Aerospace Pro Schwinn Paramount PDG 5

Mentioned: 51 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2581 Post(s)
Liked 3,612 Times in 2,174 Posts
Nothing to do with shifting, but that Trek is a small frame. If the saddle is the correct height for you, then that frame is too small.

__________________
Life is good






cb400bill is offline  
Likes For cb400bill:
Old 08-11-21, 02:14 PM
  #16  
dddd
Ride, Wrench, Swap, Race
 
dddd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Northern California
Posts: 8,211

Bikes: Cheltenham-Pedersen racer, Boulder F/S Paris-Roubaix, Varsity racer, '52 Christophe, '62 Continental, '92 Merckx, '75 Limongi, '76 Presto, '72 Gitane SC, '71 Schwinn SS, etc.

Mentioned: 116 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1143 Post(s)
Liked 607 Times in 429 Posts
I too usually go in and lubricate the shift lever's innards, both the friction surfaces and the pivot itself! I keep a TriFlow bottle with motor oil in it for this.

The old grease can cause a rubbery/viscous feel at the lever that is awful, quite detrimental to shifting ease.

The cabling has the pull path (inner wire) and the push path (housing and stops) which together add up to allow some unwanted elasticity between the shift lever and the derailer.

The "pull" elasticity is increased by sharp bends, such as skewed cable exits from ferrules or from a tight-radius cable guide atop the bb shell.
These bends tend to straighten in response to changes in cable tension such that the tangents straighten out, and which thus increases the cable's elasticity.

Traditional (wound) cable housing becomes more elastic wherever the coils aren't aligned in a straight line, so are best replaced with modern derailer housing (with it's structural wires running longitudinally). These modern cable housings also won't cause changes in cable tension as the handlebars are turned, so while they were invented to deal with indexed-shifting precision needs, they also greatly improve the friction-shifting experience!

Friction in the cable housings or in the derailer mechanism is what causes more of a change in the range of cable tension while shifting, and this frictional force mathematically multiplies the realized elasticity of both the cable and housings to produce error and unresponsiveness between the lever's movement and the derailer's movement.
And, where the cable follows any curved "wrap-around" path, the friction and thus error will be found to increase logarithmically with any surface-friction variable (according to T2 = T1^eμθ or "rope friction" laws of science).

All of the above, plus adding some kind of lubricated plastic material at the bottom bracket cable guide, are what I pay attention to on every vintage build that I take on.

Lastly, clean (inside), lined cable housing, combined with a silicone-based cable-specific grease such as sold by Shimano, SRAM and Finish Line, allow the cable to move with the absolute minimum of friction, so contribute to lowest-effort and greatest precision while shifting.

Last edited by dddd; 08-11-21 at 02:30 PM.
dddd is offline  
Old 08-11-21, 02:22 PM
  #17  
BFisher 
Senior Member
 
BFisher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,838
Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 582 Post(s)
Liked 1,210 Times in 603 Posts
One little point to add - make sure that when you cut your cable housing, you get a nice flat, even end. This can be achieved with either a high quality cable cutter, a Dremel and cutoff wheel, or a bench grinder.
BFisher is offline  
Likes For BFisher:
Old 08-11-21, 02:29 PM
  #18  
dweenk 
Senior Member
 
dweenk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Maryland
Posts: 3,769

Bikes: 1972 Fuji S-10-S,1970 Raleigh Sports, and more

Mentioned: 51 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 813 Post(s)
Liked 207 Times in 149 Posts
In my experience a friction system can shift very well as long as the shifter hub has the proper diameter for the rear mech. I noticed that the Trek 730 has stem shifters. My first thought was that those shifters cannot pull enough cable to go over 7 cogs reliably. As I recall the 730 Treks came with indexed twist shifters.
__________________
"The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." –Mark Twain
dweenk is offline  
Old 08-11-21, 04:01 PM
  #19  
Harold74
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: Calgary, AB Canada
Posts: 197

Bikes: 1992 Miyata 1000, 1997 Trek 730, 2001 Airborne Zeppelin, 1980+ Nishiki Olympic

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 121 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 19 Posts
Originally Posted by dweenk View Post
In my experience a friction system can shift very well as long as the shifter hub has the proper diameter for the rear mech. I noticed that the Trek 730 has stem shifters. My first thought was that those shifters cannot pull enough cable to go over 7 cogs reliably. As I recall the 730 Treks came with indexed twist shifters.
The stem shifters have enough pull to handle the 7speed cassette with about 20 degrees rotation to spare I'd say. That's correct about the twist shifters: early generation SRAM. They're much reviled, it seem, but they worked very well for me without any maintenance at all.
Harold74 is offline  
Old 08-11-21, 04:03 PM
  #20  
Harold74
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: Calgary, AB Canada
Posts: 197

Bikes: 1992 Miyata 1000, 1997 Trek 730, 2001 Airborne Zeppelin, 1980+ Nishiki Olympic

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 121 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 19 Posts
Regarding the housing ends:

1) I cut them as square as I was able to.

2) I used the Park cutters.

3) I've got alloy end caps on the housing for the two DT bikes, some SRAM and some Shimano.

4) I've been putting some grease in the end caps.
Harold74 is offline  
Likes For Harold74:
Old 08-11-21, 04:04 PM
  #21  
blamester
Blamester
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Ireland
Posts: 973

Bikes: Peugeot teamline

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 240 Post(s)
Liked 91 Times in 77 Posts
There are Shimano shifters whuch do not have the ratchetting mechanism. Dura ace 7700 for certain and i am sure other types 600 and maybe 105. I tried the ratchetting type and i didn't like them. Same reason as you. Clean friction is better for me especially when shifting down a gear helped by the derailleur spring. It's just a nicer movement.
​​​​​​
blamester is offline  
Old 08-11-21, 04:06 PM
  #22  
Harold74
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: Calgary, AB Canada
Posts: 197

Bikes: 1992 Miyata 1000, 1997 Trek 730, 2001 Airborne Zeppelin, 1980+ Nishiki Olympic

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 121 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 19 Posts
Originally Posted by rccardr View Post
Plus, the housing loop for the RD is way too long on each bike. Should be just long enough to make a smooth curve, that’s usually around a foot long.
Noted. I just measured the housing lenghts:

Trek = 16" (shifts the best)
Miyata = 11" (shifts better than the Olympic)
Nishiki = 14" (shifts the worst)
Harold74 is offline  
Old 08-11-21, 04:12 PM
  #23  
Harold74
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: Calgary, AB Canada
Posts: 197

Bikes: 1992 Miyata 1000, 1997 Trek 730, 2001 Airborne Zeppelin, 1980+ Nishiki Olympic

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 121 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 19 Posts
Originally Posted by cb400bill View Post
Nothing to do with shifting, but that Trek is a small frame. If the saddle is the correct height for you, then that frame is too small.
Yeah it is. If you're interested, I have a thread dedicated to precisely that issue: Link.

Interestingly, the only catalog photo that I could find of the bike actually has it set up not too far off of where I have it. It winds up with the bars an inch or two below the seat which is rather alot like all of my road bikes. Granted, I'm sure that the Trek was meant to be more upright than I ride it. Two things help to mitigate this:

1) I have disproportionately long arms.

2) That bike's sole function is to be the dog park dog trailer puller for use by everybody in the family. Even when it's me riding the bike, the excess stand over is helpful for all of the stop and go, fetch while in motion action.
Harold74 is offline  
Old 08-11-21, 04:15 PM
  #24  
Harold74
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: Calgary, AB Canada
Posts: 197

Bikes: 1992 Miyata 1000, 1997 Trek 730, 2001 Airborne Zeppelin, 1980+ Nishiki Olympic

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 121 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 19 Posts
Originally Posted by blamester View Post
There are Shimano shifters whuch do not have the ratchetting mechanism. Dura ace 7700 for certain and i am sure other types 600 and maybe 105. I tried the ratchetting type and i didn't like them. Same reason as you. Clean friction is better for me especially when shifting down a gear helped by the derailleur spring. It's just a nicer movement.​​​​​​
It's good to hear that I'm not alone in feeling that way. The ratchet shifters seem to have quite the following. The other thing that i don't love about them is that they rattle quite a bit when I hit rough patches of road. That's not a big deal but I don't love it. I may wind up using the stem shifters on al of these bikes, despite th extra housing that implies. They're cheap and they just feel good. I already have a spare pair that I bought for the appocolypse.
Harold74 is offline  
Old 08-11-21, 04:30 PM
  #25  
tkamd73 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Menomonee Falls, WI
Posts: 1,291

Bikes: 1984 Schwinn Supersport, 1988 Trek 400T, 1977 Trek TX900, 1982 Bianchi Champione del Mondo, 1978 Raleigh Supercourse, 1986 Trek 400 Elance, 1991 Waterford PDG OS Paramount, 1971 Schwinn Sports Tourer, 1985 Trek 670

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 423 Post(s)
Liked 515 Times in 285 Posts
I’ve got 7 bikes with DT friction shifters, they all feel different, even ones with the same system. If I ride one bike for a couple of days in a row, that’s the one that feels right. I guess that’s the downside of multiple bike ownership, first world problem.
Tim
tkamd73 is offline  
Likes For tkamd73:

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.