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Would my Miyata 610 benefit from new wheels?

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Would my Miyata 610 benefit from new wheels?

Old 09-13-21, 09:15 AM
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RH Clark
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Would my Miyata 610 benefit from new wheels?

Hello everyone. I have a nice 83 Miyata 610. I put a set of 700c wheels off a Trek Comfort bike to see how well they would fit. No problems at all and I only had to adjust the cantilever brake angle from the 27" wheel position. I have put a new Altus derailleur on it which works excellent with the Shimano 7 speed MegaRange that was on the 700c wheels.

My question is whether or not I would benefit from a new wheel set in the around $500 range. I have a set of Bell 38c comfort bike tires mounted with good clearance and intend to swap them to Rene Herse soon. That made me wonder if I might benefit from a set of fairly inexpensive wheels. These wheels are 36 spoke Matrix 750 with Shimano FH-RM40 hubs. They are in very good shape and straight. I won't be going tubless. I don't need to turn this tourer into a racer. I have lighter racing bikes. On the other hand I don't load this bike.. I use it for longer distance single day rides and as a townie. I have been riding it a couple years and fit is spot on. I am just not familiar enough with wheels to know what if any improvements $500-$600 will buy me in a rim brake wheel. I can service bearings but have never built a wheel from scratch so would likely need a pre built wheel set.
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Old 09-13-21, 09:24 AM
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It is time for you to build a set of wheels. Get a nice pair of vintage FW hubs like 600 or Dura Ace, some DT Comp spokes, and TB14 rims.
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Old 09-13-21, 10:08 AM
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Your current 700c wheels sound like entry to mid level. If they donít have tons of miles on them Iíd suggest waiting until you get the new tires to see how happy you are. Thatís a good choice and I would have suggested quality new tires first before anything else. If youíre happy with the ride then all is good. If youíre not putting too high a demand on the wheelset, the biggest thing you might run across is shorter lifespan with cheaper bearings, etc.

If you decide on new wheels, a Shimano 105 (or older Ultegra/600) on Open Pro rims will give you many years of quality riding.

BTW, what brake set are you using? The 27Ē to 700c conversion with canti brakes can often be a challenge and viewers want to know!
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Old 09-13-21, 10:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Classtime View Post
It is time for you to build a set of wheels. Get a nice pair of vintage FW hubs like 600 or Dura Ace, some DT Comp spokes, and TB14 rims.
Probably right. I have some nice 600 hubs on some tubular wheels. They came on a Trek 560 Professional with a Renolds 531 frame, I just bought. Learning wheel building is something I have been wanting to do. I currently own 14 bikes,4 of them wife and kids bikes.
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Old 09-13-21, 10:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Spaghetti Legs View Post
Your current 700c wheels sound like entry to mid level. If they donít have tons of miles on them Iíd suggest waiting until you get the new tires to see how happy you are. Thatís a good choice and I would have suggested quality new tires first before anything else. If youíre happy with the ride then all is good. If youíre not putting too high a demand on the wheelset, the biggest thing you might run across is shorter lifespan with cheaper bearings, etc.

If you decide on new wheels, a Shimano 105 (or older Ultegra/600) on Open Pro rims will give you many years of quality riding.

BTW, what brake set are you using? The 27Ē to 700c conversion with canti brakes can often be a challenge and viewers want to know!
They are the original Dia Comp. I don't know much else. I could take some pictures for you guys. I didn't post any because I just got this PC and haven't gone through the process of setting it up to quickly post pictures.
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