Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Favorite Grease?

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Favorite Grease?

Old 09-25-21, 09:39 AM
  #26  
iab
Senior Member
 
iab's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: NW Burbs, Chicago
Posts: 11,393
Mentioned: 177 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2534 Post(s)
Liked 2,295 Times in 955 Posts
Whatever the LBS has on their point of purchase display. Used some this morning on some hubs. Don't recall the brand, it don't matter.
iab is offline  
Old 09-25-21, 11:58 AM
  #27  
BFisher
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 2,202
Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 711 Post(s)
Liked 1,650 Times in 792 Posts
Any quality grease is more than sufficient for bicycle maintenance. Lucas red grease is about ten bucks a pound. Park is almost double that. Spend what you want, but don't fool yourself.

I've never tasted any of them, so I have no favorite.
BFisher is offline  
Old 09-25-21, 12:39 PM
  #28  
Mr. Spadoni 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 668
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 247 Post(s)
Liked 196 Times in 108 Posts
Originally Posted by rjhammett View Post
For bearings I use blue #2 marine grease. For everything else (bolts/screws, BB cups, etc.) I use the green heavy duty grease. The green grease is identical to one of the bike specific grease I used in the past but about a third the price.

And as I was almost home today, in a pile of free stuff at a neighbors, was a tube of Quicksilver! Maybe I’ll find the green grease on tomorrow’s ride.
Mr. Spadoni is offline  
Likes For Mr. Spadoni:
Old 09-25-21, 01:30 PM
  #29  
SurferRosa
Señor Member
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Pac NW
Posts: 6,109

Bikes: Old school lightweights

Mentioned: 75 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2560 Post(s)
Liked 3,534 Times in 1,881 Posts
Originally Posted by BFisher View Post
I've never tasted any of them, so I have no favorite.
"It's a floor wax!"

"No, it's a dessert topping!"

SurferRosa is offline  
Likes For SurferRosa:
Old 09-25-21, 01:45 PM
  #30  
rjhammett
Senior Member
 
rjhammett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Saint Paul, Minnesota
Posts: 2,301

Bikes: 92 Colnago Master PIU, 83 Pinarello Record, 92 Tommaso, 92 Merckx MX Leader, 90 Serotta Colorado II, 99 Tommasini Sintesi, 90 Pinarello Montello, 89 Tommasini Super Prestige, 08 Look 585, 89 Merckx Corsa Extra, 72 Holdsworth Professional and 3 more

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 311 Post(s)
Liked 390 Times in 183 Posts
I mentioned that it (Lucas x-tra heavy duty grease) was identical to a bike specific grease in my post above. I didn't mention that it was Park brand. I think I paid about $5 for a pound of the Lucas grease at Menards.

Originally Posted by brian3069 View Post
Lucas x-tra heavy duty grease looks, smells and tastes like Park polylube for a fraction of the price.
rjhammett is offline  
Old 09-25-21, 01:49 PM
  #31  
Chombi1 
Senior Member
 
Chombi1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 3,947
Mentioned: 100 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1406 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 521 Times in 353 Posts
Has anyone tried Super Lube Synthetic grease on their bike components?
asking, because I just bought some to lube the poly bushings on the aftermarket antisway bar I just installed on my car..... now I have lots of it and I'm looking for other uses for it.....
Surprised how light the grease is. Kinda similar to Phil Wood grease in consistency.

Last edited by Chombi1; 09-26-21 at 12:03 AM.
Chombi1 is offline  
Old 09-25-21, 02:38 PM
  #32  
brian3069
Senior Member
 
brian3069's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 1,872

Bikes: Raleigh Supercourse

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 208 Post(s)
Liked 142 Times in 85 Posts
Originally Posted by rjhammett View Post
I mentioned that it (Lucas x-tra heavy duty grease) was identical to a bike specific grease in my post above. I didn't mention that it was Park brand. I think I paid about $5 for a pound of the Lucas grease at Menards.

I would of know that if I actually read the thread before posting.
brian3069 is offline  
Old 09-25-21, 02:59 PM
  #33  
KLiNCK
Optically Corrected
 
KLiNCK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Posts: 582

Bikes: 2012 Specialized Sirrus , 2012 Specialized Roubaix Comp

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 105 Post(s)
Liked 66 Times in 30 Posts
Either or ither...


KLiNCK is offline  
Old 09-25-21, 03:41 PM
  #34  
Chuck M 
Butted Hi-Tensile
 
Chuck M's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 1,197

Bikes: Hi-Ten bike boomers, a Trek Domane and some projects

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 401 Post(s)
Liked 1,044 Times in 522 Posts
Originally Posted by BFisher View Post
Any quality grease is more than sufficient for bicycle maintenance.
I've worked with enough machinery in my life that I agree with you. I suppose someone will come out of the woodwork to say how many watts you can gain from spending more for bike specific grease. But maybe not, forum users don't seem to be as passionate about grease as they are chain lube.
__________________
"It is the unknown around the corner that turns my wheels." -- Heinz Stücke

Chuck M is offline  
Likes For Chuck M:
Old 09-25-21, 07:13 PM
  #35  
etherhuffer 
Senior Member
 
etherhuffer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: West Seattle
Posts: 1,079

Bikes: Surly Long Haul Trucker,81 Fuji Gran Tour SE, 83 Fuji S12S LTD, Voyageur 11.8 chrome, Raleigh R300 Touring, Voyageur 11.8

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 141 Post(s)
Liked 249 Times in 117 Posts
Yes, I did the exact same thing, replaced all the bushings on my 1984 Mazda diesel pickup. I have Super Lube and Marine Grease. I use marine grease in areas that will be wet regardless, like bearings. And of course, never forget the other essentials, anti-seize paste and Lock Tite.
The lubricity, viscosity, shear strength numbers on most greases are for automotive use. What may matter more is that greases and lubes that are well formulated often have ph stabilizers or anti-oxidant products in them. For fun, look up the history of Ballistol. I use that stuff on my black powder rifle and dueling pistol.
etherhuffer is offline  
Old 09-25-21, 08:28 PM
  #36  
sdn40
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Green Bay, WI
Posts: 638

Bikes: 88 Cannondale Criterium

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 284 Post(s)
Liked 136 Times in 86 Posts
Originally Posted by Chuck M View Post
I've worked with enough machinery in my life that I agree with you. I suppose someone will come out of the woodwork to say how many watts you can gain from spending more for bike specific grease. But maybe not, forum users don't seem to be as passionate about grease as they are chain lube.
Pretty much. If the Dollar Store has grease I'm sure it can handle any bike bearings. If there has been any bike bearing failures due to excessive heat surpassing the grease specs I haven't heard of it.
sdn40 is offline  
Old 09-25-21, 10:52 PM
  #37  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 13,225

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 196 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4389 Post(s)
Liked 2,430 Times in 1,578 Posts
I've used Phil's green grease since the 1970s, just because it was available in a toothpaste sized tube that was enough for my occasional needs. It's always seemed fine in wheel hubs, bottom brackets, headsets, pretty much anything that needed grease.

But more recently I've noticed some Shimano 600 Tricolor and later Ultegra hubs with original Shimano grease feel smoother, spin longer and more quietly. However, this is on a bike stand. No idea whether that translates to any measurable advantage when riding. Can't say I see any difference in my middling-speed riding.

In comparison, when I spin a hub or wheel with Phil's grease, after a few spins I can feel less... I'm not sure what the word is... it's less cohesive and buttery. And if there's any play in the bearings, however slight, I can hear a slight metallic sound. It sounds as if Phil's liquefies and loses some cohesion even with the relatively small amount of friction and heat in bicycle bearings. But I can't say that characteristic has caused any problems in bearing wear, or rolling qualities on the road.

Still, I'm kinda tempted to spend a bit more for Shimano premium grease next time I do overhaul these 600 Tricolor and Ultegra hubs. Reminds me, I need to open up the 600 Tricolor hub for a late-1980s rear wheel from an Ironman, one of those with the Wolber Alpine Super Champion rims. The rear rim cracked a year or so ago -- same month the Araya CTL-370 rear rim from my '89 Ironman cracked. Seems to be a thing with those lightweight low profile hard anodized rims after a few decades of perfectly fine service. I can salvage the hub and spokes from both wheels for another project, especially if I ever get around to trying to build my own wheels.

Reminds me, I didn't realize how much variation there is in greases until about 25 or so years ago when I overhauled a few spring piston airguns and bought a sample of every grease and lubricant sold by Beeman's back in the 1980s-'90s. Beeman's just bought specialty greases and lubes in bulk and repackaged them in small containers suitable for hobbyists. There was a red gel type grease with a lighter body, a very stiff waxy white paste, messy moly in synthetic grease, etc. A small 1 oz container could last a hobbyist a lifetime. But each was intended for specific purposes, especially to prevent dieseling inside spring piston compression chambers from grease residue contaminating the compression chamber. Some users would deliberately add inappropriate greases and oils to compression chambers to induce dieseling, which could significantly boost the power and velocity of a tiny lead pellet... at the cost of eventually damaging the airgun and injuring anyone nearby in a worst case scenario.

And I had a bunch of traditional and modern lubes intended for black powder guns. Discharged black powder residue can be very messy and damage the metal if neglected. Some folks just used old fashioned lard, which did work pretty well, but there were newer lubes with wintergreen odorants added which also worked well and reduced the sulfur smell.

I misplaced or inadvertently discarded most of those lubes during a move about 15 years ago, but still have a few samples. Might be interesting to see if I can identify them in the catalog of an industrial lube supplier to determine the characteristics. Or maybe just try 'em and see what happens. Bicycle bearings aren't a very intensive usage so I'd suspect pretty much any grease, lube, lard, wax, etc., will work for awhile.
canklecat is offline  
Old 09-26-21, 06:18 AM
  #38  
Narhay
Senior Member
 
Narhay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Toronto, ON, Canada
Posts: 3,716
Mentioned: 121 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 952 Post(s)
Liked 535 Times in 300 Posts
I have some red stuff but recently bought some blue stuff and I can figure out when I last did maintenance because the last tube was green.

I think clean, liberally applied and regularly changed is the best type of grease. I have one of those little grease guns pictured above and have to say they are the bees knees.
Narhay is offline  
Old 09-26-21, 06:38 AM
  #39  
P!N20
Senior Member
 
P!N20's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,967
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 854 Post(s)
Liked 1,261 Times in 645 Posts
Originally Posted by Chuck M View Post
I suppose someone will come out of the woodwork to say how many watts you can gain from spending more for bike specific grease.
Things You Won't Read in the C&V Forum
P!N20 is offline  
Old 09-26-21, 07:13 AM
  #40  
Bianchigirll 
Bianchi Goddess
 
Bianchigirll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Shady Pines Retirement Fort Wayne, In
Posts: 28,566

Bikes: Too many to list here check my signature.

Mentioned: 162 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2428 Post(s)
Liked 1,551 Times in 907 Posts



__________________
One morning you wake up, the girl is gone, the bikes are gone, all that's left behind is a pair of old tires and a tube of tubular glue, all squeezed out"

Sugar "Kane" Kowalczyk
Bianchigirll is offline  
Likes For Bianchigirll:
Old 09-26-21, 10:38 AM
  #41  
DiegoFrogs
Senior Member
 
DiegoFrogs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Scranton, PA, USA
Posts: 2,524

Bikes: '77 Centurion "Pro Tour"; '67 Carlton "The Flyer"; 1984 Ross MTB (stored at parents' house)

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 157 Post(s)
Liked 63 Times in 44 Posts
I don't think I've ever exhausted any one that I've bought. Typically I toss or donate whatever is left of what I have when I move (to another state or country) due to the risk of making a giant mess and buy something new when I arrive in the new place.

I've learned that I don't use much. I pretty much rebuild one bike's worth of bearings about once a year, plus lubing some stems and seatposts. In the past I've had small tubes with tiny applicator nozzles and tight fitting caps, tubes intended for grease guns that usually have a loose fitting cap, tiny tins with a loose fitting cap, and giant tubs like a small coffee can.

Honestly, I like the stuff in a tube with a tiny applicator. It's more efficient, cleaner and since I'm not worried about the cap coming off, I'd take it with me when I move. The form factor and user experience is more important to me than the specific grease.

Coaster brakes are the one application where I have to think carefully about what type I'd use, and I no longer have a bike with a coaster brake.
DiegoFrogs is offline  
Likes For DiegoFrogs:
Old 09-26-21, 10:55 AM
  #42  
Mr. Spadoni 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 668
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 247 Post(s)
Liked 196 Times in 108 Posts
Wait! You can buy bacon grease? And pass up the opportunity to cook and eat bacon? Madness, just madness.
Mr. Spadoni is offline  
Likes For Mr. Spadoni:
Old 09-26-21, 12:34 PM
  #43  
Bianchigirll 
Bianchi Goddess
 
Bianchigirll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Shady Pines Retirement Fort Wayne, In
Posts: 28,566

Bikes: Too many to list here check my signature.

Mentioned: 162 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2428 Post(s)
Liked 1,551 Times in 907 Posts
Originally Posted by Mr. Spadoni View Post
Wait! You can buy bacon grease? And pass up the opportunity to cook and eat bacon? Madness, just madness.

I was a bit surprised to see it on the store at the Kroger last holiday season. I don't eat enough bacon to collect a usable amount of grease, but was tempted to buy some for the little baking I did last year. They also have duck fat and I think some other animal.
__________________
One morning you wake up, the girl is gone, the bikes are gone, all that's left behind is a pair of old tires and a tube of tubular glue, all squeezed out"

Sugar "Kane" Kowalczyk
Bianchigirll is offline  
Old 09-26-21, 10:15 PM
  #44  
squirtdad
Senior Member
 
squirtdad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: San Jose (Willow Glen) Ca
Posts: 8,647

Bikes: 85 team Miyata (modern 5800 105) , '84 Team Miyata,(dura ace old school) 80?? SR Semi-Pro 600 Arabesque

Mentioned: 91 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1781 Post(s)
Liked 1,476 Times in 895 Posts
phil's
__________________
Life is too short not to ride the best bike you have, as much as you can
(looking for Torpado Super light 56,57 or so)

squirtdad is offline  
Old 09-27-21, 06:30 AM
  #45  
bluesteak 
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 170
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 97 Post(s)
Liked 63 Times in 32 Posts
I have a can of Phil wood grease that I use for most things, and a tube of “moly” grease that I put on threads, and (this is not approved) a chain lube. I use wd40 as a solvent, and then give a light coat of moly grease, wiping of the excess.
__________________
TigerTom
bluesteak is offline  
Old 09-27-21, 07:31 AM
  #46  
mechanicmatt
Hoards Thumbshifters
 
mechanicmatt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Signal Mountain, TN
Posts: 1,143

Bikes: '87 Bruce Gordon Chinook, '08 Jamis Aurora, '86 Trek 560, '97 Mongoose Rockadile, & '91 Trek 750

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 229 Post(s)
Liked 294 Times in 176 Posts
I used to Use Phil's and Park blue for years. But they both break down in the hot Kansas summers and bleed out. Then bought this, 10 years in, no troubles. It's very, very good. I think now it goes by Valvoline synthetic grease. It's a moly-synthetic blend, never had a heat failure with it. Anyone use the various branded marine rated red grease?


Last edited by mechanicmatt; 09-27-21 at 07:35 AM.
mechanicmatt is offline  
Old 09-27-21, 09:27 AM
  #47  
tjfastback66
Junior Member
 
tjfastback66's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 199

Bikes: a few

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 67 Post(s)
Liked 196 Times in 78 Posts
tjfastback66 is offline  
Old 09-27-21, 12:11 PM
  #48  
scarlson 
Senior Member
 
scarlson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Medford MA
Posts: 1,821

Bikes: Ron Cooper touring, 1959 Jack Taylor 650b ladyback touring tandem, Vitus 979, Joe Bell painted Claud Butler Dalesman, Colin Laing curved tube tandem, heavily-Dilberted 1982 Trek 6xx, René Herse tandem

Mentioned: 67 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 837 Post(s)
Liked 1,114 Times in 599 Posts
Originally Posted by Bianchigirll View Post
I was a bit surprised to see it on the store at the Kroger last holiday season. I don't eat enough bacon to collect a usable amount of grease, but was tempted to buy some for the little baking I did last year. They also have duck fat and I think some other animal.
Duck fat is soooo goood!!
I have been making duck confit in my crock pot pretty regularly since the covid shutdowns. It is my absolute favorite food and you get so much fat leftover after you're done with the duck. Oven fries made with duck fat are absolutely to die for. In order not to die from them, you gotta ride! I also like to use duck fat to fry up the venison I get from hunters in my family. Helps to compensate for how lean it is. When I run out of fat, it is time to make duck again.

I have thought about using animal fat as bicycle grease, but of course I would not waste good fat on bicycles. I bet beef tallow would work best in warm temperatures. Cooler temperatures call for something less stiff, like chicken or duck fat. I do wonder if it would break down in use, and run out of the bearings.

You ever hear about those mountain bikers getting attacked by bears? Maybe this is why... The bears just wanted the grease in the hubs!
__________________
Owner & co-founder, Cycles René Hubris. Unfortunately attaching questionable braze-ons to perfectly good frames since about 2015. With style.
scarlson is offline  
Old 09-28-21, 12:11 AM
  #49  
The Thin Man 
Senior Member
 
The Thin Man's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Corvallis, OR
Posts: 1,171
Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 115 Post(s)
Liked 124 Times in 54 Posts
Motorex for all around grease. Great stuff! I've been using it for years.

Finish Line premium with Teflon for headsets, BB's and wheel bearings.

Shimano Premium for my personal rigs.


The Thin Man is offline  
Old 09-28-21, 09:05 AM
  #50  
RustyJames 
Senior Member
 
RustyJames's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2021
Location: Beaverton, OR
Posts: 866

Bikes: You had me at rusty and Italian!!

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 336 Post(s)
Liked 514 Times in 290 Posts
This is the most civilized oil/grease discussion I’ve ever read on the internet!
RustyJames is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.