Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Looking for a Rando Conversion Candidate: Fuji Espree?

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Looking for a Rando Conversion Candidate: Fuji Espree?

Old 10-13-21, 03:12 PM
  #51  
reluctantsuburb
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 132
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 72 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 13 Posts
Originally Posted by polymorphself View Post
And I’m not sure but I imagine this bike is not very low trail, as most tourers of the era don’t seem to be. You’d want a specifically rando bike for that geometry or maybe to have somebody modify it.
For trail, yes, that makes sense. I don't know that I've seen anything in the Dallas market that's a true rando frame, though that may just be a case of my ignorance! I think if I were to really fall in love with a frame, I might consider getting the fork re-raked, but that's probably a few steps downfield from where I am today
reluctantsuburb is offline  
Likes For reluctantsuburb:
Old 10-13-21, 03:36 PM
  #52  
Korina
Happy banana slug
 
Korina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Arcata, California, U.S., North America, Earth, Saggitarius Arm, Milky Way
Posts: 2,484

Bikes: 1992 Specialized Rockhopper Sport, 2016 Giant Liv Rove Lite, 1995 Trek Singletrack 930, 1994 Trek Multitrack 750

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 921 Post(s)
Liked 606 Times in 406 Posts
Don't know if this'll help, but it can't hurt!

Korina is offline  
Likes For Korina:
Old 10-13-21, 05:09 PM
  #53  
bark_eater 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Eastern Shore, MD
Posts: 1,451

Bikes: Road ready: 1993 Koga Miyata City Liner Touring Hybrid, 1989 Centurion Sport DLX, "I Blame GP" Bridgestone CB-1. Projects: Yea, I got a problem....

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 490 Post(s)
Liked 235 Times in 171 Posts
You've got a great set of components. I'd keep an eye out for a larger sized Fuji s10 or s12 to steal the low trail frame from.
bark_eater is offline  
Likes For bark_eater:
Old 10-13-21, 07:48 PM
  #54  
ThermionicScott 
working on my sandal tan
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 20,906

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers), All-City Space Horse (hers)

Mentioned: 93 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3097 Post(s)
Liked 1,219 Times in 818 Posts
Sounds like you're off to a great start with this one! Since we're heading into winter, I'd just focus on having fun and observing what you like and don't like for now. Go on longer rides, and bring allen wrenches to experiment with the saddle and stem positions. (I think I spy a witness line on your seatpost -- I do the same thing.)

Some neck pain might be normal right now since you're needing to hold you head up at an angle. Make sure you're not hunching your back -- holding it straighter lets you see ahead without needing to bend your neck as much.

If the ride is comfortable, some road buzz isn't bad. Subconsciously, it might encourage you by making you feel like you're going fast!
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498

Last edited by ThermionicScott; 10-13-21 at 08:07 PM.
ThermionicScott is offline  
Old 10-13-21, 08:56 PM
  #55  
Classtime 
Senior Member
 
Classtime's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 2,888

Bikes: 82 Medici, 2011 Richard Sachs, 2011 Milwaukee Road

Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1093 Post(s)
Liked 498 Times in 337 Posts
I don't understand drop bars with that stem. Try Northroads, Albatross or Oxford bars. Or maybe you really want to try drop bars on your Cimarron with the RTP tires. And maybe your saddle can come forward some? I always shoot for clamping the middle of the rails.
__________________
I don't do: disks, tubeless, e-shifting, or bead head nymphs.
Classtime is offline  
Likes For Classtime:
Old 10-14-21, 05:53 AM
  #56  
Prowler 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Near Pottstown, PA: 30 miles NW of Philadelphia
Posts: 1,823

Bikes: 2 Trek Mtn, Cannondale R600 road, 6 vintage road bikes

Mentioned: 72 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 346 Post(s)
Liked 424 Times in 211 Posts
Drops: I have 10 bikes with drops, all are 25 to 30mm lower than the saddle. I submit that they are better for you as they offer 6 hand positions and being lower than the saddle, force your weight onto your legs and off your hands and butt. Nice. You don't need to be "super aero" but, I think, having much of your weight centered on your legs is a good thing. Yes, your neck will hurt for a while but push through that. All sports hurt for a while as your body adjusts. I can comfortably ride in the drops and see well down the road. No worries.

Trail: trail is hard to see but easy to measure. I use a long straight rod to map the steering center through the head tube and fork. I have a shorter rod with one end bent 90° so it inserts into the hollow axle and the rest goes straight to the floor/tire contact point. The difference on the floor is trail. I have an 84 Fuji TS III that has the original trail of 35mm. I enjoy that ride but have not toured yet with a heavy front load. Sumptin kynna plowed those plans aside for a bit.
Prowler is online now  
Likes For Prowler:
Old 10-14-21, 06:46 AM
  #57  
bark_eater 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Eastern Shore, MD
Posts: 1,451

Bikes: Road ready: 1993 Koga Miyata City Liner Touring Hybrid, 1989 Centurion Sport DLX, "I Blame GP" Bridgestone CB-1. Projects: Yea, I got a problem....

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 490 Post(s)
Liked 235 Times in 171 Posts
This bike is a proportionately larger frame on me, but I started off with a fully elevated Nitto Technomic stem and generic Maes bars. I probably gained some conditioning, but I think where I ended up is mostly finding a ergonomic fit. Right now the the bars are 42cm randonneur bars and the Technomic is "slammed". I am actually very comfortable in the drops with this set up. One thing you have to look out for is that the as you bring a stem up the effective reach gets shorter. Hard telling, not knowing, but it could be that your neck is being effected by your back scrunching into to short of a cockpit.

Redundant embarrassing illustration:

bark_eater is offline  
Likes For bark_eater:
Old 10-16-21, 05:19 AM
  #58  
bark_eater 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Eastern Shore, MD
Posts: 1,451

Bikes: Road ready: 1993 Koga Miyata City Liner Touring Hybrid, 1989 Centurion Sport DLX, "I Blame GP" Bridgestone CB-1. Projects: Yea, I got a problem....

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 490 Post(s)
Liked 235 Times in 171 Posts


https://www.facebook.com/marketplace...c-cb2d3c7066e4
bark_eater is offline  
Old 10-16-21, 06:01 AM
  #59  
reluctantsuburb
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 132
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 72 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 13 Posts
Well, thanks to all for the input. I can tell you I am very, thoroughly confused

Here's where I stand today:
  • I've gotten in a few sub ten mile rides and they've all been very enjoyable. The bike is speedy and fun. I feel like I'm growing used to the drops and enjoying them
  • The bike is definitely smaller than ideal, but I'm trying to decide if it's a workable size. I've been considering some wheel sets but am currently afraid to pull the trigger due to some of the comments here
  • When it comes to a vintage bike like this, I imagine there will always be something I'm compromising on... Trying not to set too high of expectations
All of that being said, I'd love input on a couple of things from anyone still viewing the thread. I forced my wife to take a few profile shots of me on the bike so we're not just in the theoretical when talking about fit. One on the tops, one on the hoods, one in the drops.
  • Based on fit with my current frankenstem, does the bike look like it's worth continuing to invest in? Next steps are stem, wheel set, and brakes
  • Based on what you're seeing and my stated use case of pseudo rando, am I barking up the wrong tree?
thanks!


reluctantsuburb is offline  
Old 10-16-21, 06:14 AM
  #60  
Jeff Neese
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 407
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 154 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 71 Times in 50 Posts
You're getting a lot of good recommendations, but back to your original post, vintage Fuji road bikes do have a fantastic ride quality. The Espree was on the lower end of their line though. You may want to hold out for something a bit higher on the food chain.

Whatever you choose, remember that it takes just as much time and costs as much money to restore/upgrade a lower-tier bike as it does a better one, so choose the best bike with the best frame that you can, from the start. Make sure the bike you choose is worth it.
Jeff Neese is offline  
Old 10-16-21, 10:11 AM
  #61  
52telecaster
ambulatory senior
 
52telecaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Peoria Il
Posts: 3,650

Bikes: Bob Jackson World Tour, Falcon and lots of other bikes.

Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1125 Post(s)
Liked 618 Times in 347 Posts
In your pic you don't look way too tall for the frame but the bars are extremely high. At my age and my neck problems I feel the need to ride very upright as well. To facilitate this I use north road or porteur bars. It might be an option for you.

Keep riding baby!

650b

700c
52telecaster is offline  
Old 10-16-21, 12:56 PM
  #62  
ThermionicScott 
working on my sandal tan
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 20,906

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers), All-City Space Horse (hers)

Mentioned: 93 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3097 Post(s)
Liked 1,219 Times in 818 Posts
Originally Posted by reluctantsuburb View Post
Well, thanks to all for the input. I can tell you I am very, thoroughly confused

Here's where I stand today:
  • I've gotten in a few sub ten mile rides and they've all been very enjoyable. The bike is speedy and fun. I feel like I'm growing used to the drops and enjoying them
  • The bike is definitely smaller than ideal, but I'm trying to decide if it's a workable size. I've been considering some wheel sets but am currently afraid to pull the trigger due to some of the comments here
  • When it comes to a vintage bike like this, I imagine there will always be something I'm compromising on... Trying not to set too high of expectations
All of that being said, I'd love input on a couple of things from anyone still viewing the thread. I forced my wife to take a few profile shots of me on the bike so we're not just in the theoretical when talking about fit. One on the tops, one on the hoods, one in the drops.
  • Based on fit with my current frankenstem, does the bike look like it's worth continuing to invest in? Next steps are stem, wheel set, and brakes
  • Based on what you're seeing and my stated use case of pseudo rando, am I barking up the wrong tree?
thanks!

I didn't appreciate how tall you are before seeing these pictures! The fact that you can put a foot down while in the saddle makes me think the saddle itself is a bit too low. Raising it up a bit would probably convince most others that the frame is at least a size too small. If it were me in this situation, I'd pull the plug on this frame and look for something that's bigger, but perhaps not much longer in the top tube. Some brands of road bikes tended to use about the same top tube length between frame sizes, so it shouldn't be too hard.

I see that you're holding your arms straight in the photos. Maybe that's a function of trying to hold a pose, but you'll want to ride with your elbows bent a little -- that helps a lot with absorbing shocks before they get to your shoulders and neck. Apart from that, I wouldn't fret about having your handlebars set "too high" for now. When I first got into road bikes, I used a short stem set at least as high as the saddle, but as my core strength and flexibility improved, I was able to stretch out and down.

P.S. Tell your wife that a random person from your bike website says she's a good sport.
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498

Last edited by ThermionicScott; 10-16-21 at 01:01 PM.
ThermionicScott is offline  
Likes For ThermionicScott:
Old 10-16-21, 01:01 PM
  #63  
52telecaster
ambulatory senior
 
52telecaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Peoria Il
Posts: 3,650

Bikes: Bob Jackson World Tour, Falcon and lots of other bikes.

Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1125 Post(s)
Liked 618 Times in 347 Posts
Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
I didn't appreciate how tall you are before seeing these pictures! The fact that you can put a foot down while in the saddle makes me think the saddle itself is a bit too low. Raising it up a bit would probably convince most others that the frame is at least a size too small. If it were me in this situation, I'd pull the plug on this frame and look for something that's bigger, but perhaps not much longer in the top tube. Some brands of road bikes tended to use about the same top tube length between frame sizes, so it shouldn't be too hard.

I see that you're holding your arms straight in the photos. Maybe that's a function of trying to hold a pose, but you'll want to ride with your elbows bent a little -- that helps a lot with absorbing shocks before they get to your shoulders and neck. Apart from that, I wouldn't fret about having your handlebars set "too high" for now. When I first got into road bikes, I used a short stem set at least as high as the saddle, but as my core strength and flexibility improved, I was able to stretch out and down.
Second look at him and I think you are right about the frame size. Another inch at least.
52telecaster is offline  
Old 10-16-21, 01:32 PM
  #64  
GhostRider62
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 919
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 555 Post(s)
Liked 437 Times in 270 Posts
I have many bikes that I randonneur on and also one that is a 650B conversion. I would strongly recommend getting a higher quality frame that fits OR buying someone else's mistake.

I got an unbelievable deal on an older custom made frame with True Temper OS Platinum tubes. I built up a set of 650B wheels with good quality parts and put on Rene Hearse Extra legere tires. I had pretty much all of the other parts but if I had to purchase them, I would into this bike for a lot of money. The bottomline message from me.....it won't be cheap and starting with an undersized frame of mediocre quality is a mistake. Sorry to be so blunt.

I also have another randonneuring bike that runs 700 x 35 tires or sometimes 32 mm.

They both are more comfortable than a full on racing bike using 25 or 28 mm tires but the racing bike also finishes the randonneuring brevet much quicker. There is no contest. If your objective is to have a comfy bike for rides under 100 miles, you are on the right path but expect it not to be so inexpensive. Do yourself a favor.....start with a different frame.
GhostRider62 is offline  
Old 10-16-21, 01:35 PM
  #65  
Dfrost 
Senior Member
 
Dfrost's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 1,763

Bikes: ‘87 Marinoni SLX Sports Tourer, ‘79 Miyata 912 by Gugificazione

Mentioned: 151 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 420 Post(s)
Liked 212 Times in 136 Posts
@reluctantsuburb,
Looking at your photos, the frame might be a size too small, or at least the seat height might be a touch low.

Try checking your leg position while coasting, after you’ve been riding for a few minutes to get in your usual seated position. Put your heel, or arch if shoes have a significant heel height, on the pedal. Your leg should then be completely straight to maintain contact with the pedal. When pedaling normally with the ball of your foot on the pedal, then the leg has a good bend, like this:



Your saddle might also be a bit too far forward. Many like to check that the kneecap is directly above the pedal spindle when the crank is forward, like this.



Only change one thing at a time, and in small increments (1/8-1/4”). Try that change for a while before you adjust farther. You’ll get a sense when you’ve gone a bit to far, so then return to the previous position. Saddle tilt is another important variable for me, after having figured out the saddle that works well for my posterior.

I'll ride alone with appropriate wrenches and a small tape measure when adjusting my “cockpit”. BTW, I put the bike on a “wind trainer”, camera on a tripod with time delay photos to verify fit and compare on different bikes. All that background detail helps visualize how my position changes. The first shot was part of a sequence comparing two bikes a few years ago, second (actually about 6 years earlier) was taken when I first got this bike to compare different stems and bar heights, and this was not the final stem choice. My stem height is now just below seat height as in the shot with the white bar tape, which works for my 72 years and loss of torso length/flexibility over decades of riding. I’m extremely comfortable on this bike for any distance that my legs, etc. can handle.

Last edited by Dfrost; 10-16-21 at 01:42 PM.
Dfrost is offline  
Old 10-16-21, 01:37 PM
  #66  
reluctantsuburb
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 132
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 72 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 13 Posts
Eesh what a bummer. Dallas does not see a lot of frames of this style come across. Lots of old MTBs or carbon fiber frames. I'll keep a lookout but was really hoping to make this work.

I guess this is a lesson learned in trusting the seller's measurements Thanks to all for the input.
reluctantsuburb is offline  
Old 10-16-21, 01:42 PM
  #67  
reluctantsuburb
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 132
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 72 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 13 Posts
Any chance anyone can be of help in identifying this Bianchi? It's the only intriguing listing of the day on CL! Not much info, listed at $200

https://dallas.craigslist.org/mdf/bi...394734744.html

reluctantsuburb is offline  
Old 10-16-21, 01:45 PM
  #68  
Dfrost 
Senior Member
 
Dfrost's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 1,763

Bikes: ‘87 Marinoni SLX Sports Tourer, ‘79 Miyata 912 by Gugificazione

Mentioned: 151 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 420 Post(s)
Liked 212 Times in 136 Posts
That Bianchi is a very big frame, much larger than the bike in your photos - compare the head tube lengths. The CL post says 58, but it looks like 63+cm. Judging by the “turkey” levers and stem shifters, it’s a lower end bike.

Way up in the first post, you suggested that a 60cm frame is probably a good size, and backed that up with your PBH measurement.

Once you’ve established your acceptable range of sizes, watch the C&V Sales sub-forum. Also check the Sticky threads for the “Frame doesn’t fit”. We all love to help spend other folk’s money!

Last edited by Dfrost; 10-16-21 at 01:54 PM.
Dfrost is offline  
Old 10-16-21, 01:51 PM
  #69  
Classtime 
Senior Member
 
Classtime's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 2,888

Bikes: 82 Medici, 2011 Richard Sachs, 2011 Milwaukee Road

Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1093 Post(s)
Liked 498 Times in 337 Posts
To play internet fitter, the seat tube is ok (could confirm with pedals at 6 and 12) but looks like you have a long torso-arm combination and could use a bigger frame. Pass on the bianchi. Look closely at the rear corset-derailleur and notice that there is a separate metal derailleur hanger and that the derailleur is not bolted directly to the frame? Not what you want. A separate claw like often signals less than "Nice Bike".

go get this https://dallas.craigslist.org/dal/bi...376666513.html
It will take some work but it is cool as hell and I don't think it will be too big.
__________________
I don't do: disks, tubeless, e-shifting, or bead head nymphs.

Last edited by Classtime; 10-16-21 at 01:57 PM.
Classtime is offline  
Old 10-16-21, 02:10 PM
  #70  
reluctantsuburb
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 132
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 72 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 13 Posts
Originally Posted by Dfrost View Post
That Bianchi is a very big frame, much larger than the bike in your photos - compare the head tube lengths. The CL post says 58, but it looks like 63+cm. Judging by the “turkey” levers and stem shifters, it’s a lower end bike.

Way up in the first post, you suggested that a 60cm frame is probably a good size, and backed that up with your PBH measurement.

Once you’ve established your acceptable range of sizes, watch the C&V Sales sub-forum. Also check the Sticky threads for the “Frame doesn’t fit”. We all love to help spend other folk’s money!
Haha! Love it. Thanks for both replies. Honestly I think I was just fishing on the bianchi, hoping that as this frame seems like it's not an option something else could be

I think you are right and your pictures were very helpful, I just made a few micro adjustments and things felt a little more natural and I was able to keep a bend in my arms. Either way, I think a 60 cm frame is ultimately what I'm after and now it's a question of how much I try to make this bike work versus just list it for sale and begin the search again
reluctantsuburb is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.