Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

New video: How to purchase a vintage road bike. Let me know what you think.

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

New video: How to purchase a vintage road bike. Let me know what you think.

Old 10-12-21, 07:57 PM
  #1  
jjhabbs 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jjhabbs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 1,595

Bikes: to many to list

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 216 Post(s)
Liked 363 Times in 121 Posts
New video: How to purchase a vintage road bike. Let me know what you think.

Hey guys,
I did another "how to" video. How to purchase a vintage road bike. What to look for while purchasing. This video was based upon being able to see the bike in person.
Be gentle with me. lol

__________________
From Illinois. Collector of many fine bicycles from all over the world. Subscribe to my Youtube channel. Just search John's vintage road bike garage
jjhabbs is offline  
Likes For jjhabbs:
Old 10-12-21, 08:32 PM
  #2  
iab
Senior Member
 
iab's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: NW Burbs, Chicago
Posts: 10,938
Mentioned: 153 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2299 Post(s)
Liked 1,532 Times in 698 Posts
Use your finger to feel under the top and down tubes for a front-ender. Sometimes cracked paint on top doesn't happen.
Using a term like wheel dish will be unknown for beginners.
Show forged versus stamped dropout. Again, a beginner won't get it if you show only one.

But all in all, nice.
iab is offline  
Likes For iab:
Old 10-13-21, 01:53 PM
  #3  
jjhabbs 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jjhabbs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 1,595

Bikes: to many to list

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 216 Post(s)
Liked 363 Times in 121 Posts
What other "how to" videos would be interesting?

JJ
__________________
From Illinois. Collector of many fine bicycles from all over the world. Subscribe to my Youtube channel. Just search John's vintage road bike garage
jjhabbs is offline  
Old 10-13-21, 03:12 PM
  #4  
SurferRosa
Señor Member
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Pac NW
Posts: 4,739

Bikes: Old school lightweights

Mentioned: 61 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1949 Post(s)
Liked 2,230 Times in 1,236 Posts
You can normally tell if a bike is in good shape or not, just by looking at it and talking with the seller about its history. Conversation is one of the most important things when buying. Next, feel for dents, dings and bulges behind the head tube. Spin the wheels. If you must, ask the seller to loosen the stem and seatpost.

Personally, I wouldn't allow a potential buyer to put a spoke wrench to my bike.
SurferRosa is offline  
Old 10-13-21, 03:41 PM
  #5  
genejockey 
Klaatu..Verata..Necktie?
 
genejockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 7,184

Bikes: Canyon Endurace, 105; Battaglin MAX, Chorus; Bianchi 928 Veloce; Ritchey Road Logic, Dura Ace; Cannondale R500 RX100; Schwinn Circuit, Sante; Lotus Supreme, Dura Ace

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3677 Post(s)
Liked 3,871 Times in 1,969 Posts
I watched this last night, and I not only liked it, I "Liked" it - you know, thumbs up on YouTube? It gave me some ideas on how to approach buying bikes - though I really hope I'm done with that, for a while, anyway.

I like the idea of the straight edge. I haven't been using one, but I've been lucky so far. I do already look for the creases behind the head tube lugs. So far, the bikes I've bought have all been in the under $500 range - some WAY below that - so I'm a lot less persnickety than I would be if I were going for a Colnago covered in Nuovo Record!

SurferRosa makes a great point about talking with the seller, but something else that comes in really handy is knowing as much about the bike you're looking at as possible. I also collect vintage American watches, and in watch collecting, knowing more about the watch than the seller does is always to your advantage. With vintage bikes, knowing what components should be there, and thus what you may need to replace to make the bike more authentic can save you money. So, when I was buying a 1989 Schwinn Circuit that had a later, generic saddle, but the seller pulls out a new-looking San Marco Rolls, and says, "It had this saddle when I got it from the last guy who owned it. Do you want it?" I knew to say "YES!!"
__________________
"Don't take life so serious-it ain't nohow permanent."
genejockey is online now  
Old 10-13-21, 04:53 PM
  #6  
Gonzo Bob
cycles per second
 
Gonzo Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 1,883

Bikes: Early 1980's Ishiwata 022 steel sport/touring, 1986 Vitus 979, 1988 DiamondBack Apex, 1997 Softride PowerWing 700, 2001 Trek OCLV 110

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Liked 50 Times in 32 Posts
[QUOTE=jjhabbs;22268020]Hey guys,
I did another "how to" video. How to purchase a vintage road bike. What to look for while purchasing. This video was based upon being able to see the bike in person.
Be gentle with me. lol/QUOTE]
Good video and good advice, but maybe a bit too cautious?. Would've liked to have seen at least one of your "regrets" or "mistakes" but maybe you get rid of them right away. Plus, you panned across your collection way too fast and way too zoomed out .

All of my bikes probably qualify as vintage (my most recent purchase is a carbon fiber bike from ~20 years ago ) and none are in "perfect working order". My old aluminum bike (35-years-old) has been boxed up and put on countless airplane flights and has not been perfectly aligned for about 33 years, but it still rides fine (OK, it pulls slightly left when going no-handed) and I am not about to get it fixed since aluminum weakens with every bending. My steel MTB and sport/touring bikes have some exterior rust from cables and chains chipping away at the paint, so they don't look so pretty in some spots, but that damage is not structural. Wheel trueness is not as a big a deal as wheel roundness.

Re: rear triangle alignment. Don't need a straight edge. I was hit by a car and my bike frame was all messed up, and my bike shop used a piece of string around the headtube back to the rear drop outs, and measured the distance between the string and the seat tube to gauge alignment.
Gonzo Bob is offline  
Old 10-13-21, 05:51 PM
  #7  
jjhabbs 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jjhabbs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 1,595

Bikes: to many to list

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 216 Post(s)
Liked 363 Times in 121 Posts
[QUOTE=Gonzo Bob;22269016]
Originally Posted by jjhabbs View Post
Hey guys,
I did another "how to" video. How to purchase a vintage road bike. What to look for while purchasing. This video was based upon being able to see the bike in person.
Be gentle with me. lol/QUOTE]
Good video and good advice, but maybe a bit too cautious?. Would've liked to have seen at least one of your "regrets" or "mistakes" but maybe you get rid of them right away. Plus, you panned across your collection way too fast and way too zoomed out .

All of my bikes probably qualify as vintage (my most recent purchase is a carbon fiber bike from ~20 years ago ) and none are in "perfect working order". My old aluminum bike (35-years-old) has been boxed up and put on countless airplane flights and has not been perfectly aligned for about 33 years, but it still rides fine (OK, it pulls slightly left when going no-handed) and I am not about to get it fixed since aluminum weakens with every bending. My steel MTB and sport/touring bikes have some exterior rust from cables and chains chipping away at the paint, so they don't look so pretty in some spots, but that damage is not structural. Wheel trueness is not as a big a deal as wheel roundness.

Re: rear triangle alignment. Don't need a straight edge. I was hit by a car and my bike frame was all messed up, and my bike shop used a piece of string around the headtube back to the rear drop outs, and measured the distance between the string and the seat tube to gauge alignment.
Great point on the string method. I used that at the store I worked at in the 80s. Does exactly the same thing. Actually. I fyou string it a couple different ways you can determine if there is a twist in the frame as well.. GREAT Point!

JJ
__________________
From Illinois. Collector of many fine bicycles from all over the world. Subscribe to my Youtube channel. Just search John's vintage road bike garage
jjhabbs is offline  
Old 10-13-21, 07:04 PM
  #8  
steelbikeguy
Senior Member
 
steelbikeguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Peoria, IL
Posts: 2,770
Mentioned: 71 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1024 Post(s)
Liked 989 Times in 524 Posts
another thought... but it only applies to buying remotely...
back in the early internet days of 1997, I came across an ad for the Olmo that I now own. It was offered for sale by a fellow in the eastern USA. I talked to him, but wasn't sure about the deal. He offered to put me in touch with a fellow he had recently sold another bike to, and this fellow was able to give me some confidence in the seller. So, getting in touch with with someone else who has dealt with a prospective seller isn't a bad idea.

A side benefit is that the person acting as a reference might ride the same size bikes as you, which can be a useful thing! I ended up putting this fellow in touch with a local shop that was selling a nearly NOS Paramount.

As far as the Olmo, it had a bit more wear than I expected, but it's been a great bike! Lots of pantographed parts, and it's not too pretty to ride.


Steve in Peoria
steelbikeguy is offline  
Old 10-13-21, 08:05 PM
  #9  
jonny7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 273

Bikes: 1994 Cadex CFR3, 1993 Cannondale R600, 2006 Scott CR1 SL, Rossin x 2, Bertrand GB3000, Gardin

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Liked 39 Times in 26 Posts
All these bikes look like they'd be perfect for me great vid!
jonny7 is offline  
Old 10-13-21, 08:47 PM
  #10  
jjhabbs 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jjhabbs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 1,595

Bikes: to many to list

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 216 Post(s)
Liked 363 Times in 121 Posts
Originally Posted by steelbikeguy View Post
another thought... but it only applies to buying remotely...
back in the early internet days of 1997, I came across an ad for the Olmo that I now own. It was offered for sale by a fellow in the eastern USA. I talked to him, but wasn't sure about the deal. He offered to put me in touch with a fellow he had recently sold another bike to, and this fellow was able to give me some confidence in the seller. So, getting in touch with with someone else who has dealt with a prospective seller isn't a bad idea.

A side benefit is that the person acting as a reference might ride the same size bikes as you, which can be a useful thing! I ended up putting this fellow in touch with a local shop that was selling a nearly NOS Paramount.

As far as the Olmo, it had a bit more wear than I expected, but it's been a great bike! Lots of pantographed parts, and it's not too pretty to ride.


Steve in Peoria
Great suggestions. I omitted "how to buy remotely" from the video. Maybe I shouldn't have. I have a hard time buying online. I do it often but I dont like to. Ive been surprised at how good the bikes were that I purchased. On the other hand some were awful. I usually ask the seller to send me the five worst cosmetic wounds they could find. That eliminates a lot of potential purchases.
Good Ideas! Thanks

JJ
__________________
From Illinois. Collector of many fine bicycles from all over the world. Subscribe to my Youtube channel. Just search John's vintage road bike garage
jjhabbs is offline  
Old 10-14-21, 05:34 AM
  #11  
hose
Miyata Mike
 
hose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2021
Location: belchertown, MA
Posts: 113
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Liked 43 Times in 30 Posts
I've bought 3 of my bikes - $200 / $300 and $1200... going off the pictures and just looking at it for 5 seconds knowing im getting a DEAL. Research research research.
hose is offline  
Likes For hose:
Old 10-14-21, 06:41 AM
  #12  
steelbikeguy
Senior Member
 
steelbikeguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Peoria, IL
Posts: 2,770
Mentioned: 71 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1024 Post(s)
Liked 989 Times in 524 Posts
Originally Posted by jjhabbs View Post
Great suggestions. I omitted "how to buy remotely" from the video. Maybe I shouldn't have. I have a hard time buying online. I do it often but I dont like to. Ive been surprised at how good the bikes were that I purchased. On the other hand some were awful.
The Olmo was the only bike where I was a bit disappointed, so I might be doing pretty well. In general, it can be risky!
Now that I think about it, all of my vintage bikes were purchased remotely! It's only four bikes, so I'm not buying many, which probably helps.
One was from a fellow who was selling the bike nearly new-in-box. This was the Raleigh International, and he even threw in an extra bar and stem and a T.A. handlebar bottle cage, which I love!
The other two were from long-time members on the Classic Rendezvous list (and they sort of lurk here), so they had good reputations. The bikes were well photographed and documented, and I wasn't disappointed.
A side benefit is that they might consider selling other bikes at a later date.


Originally Posted by jjhabbs View Post
I usually ask the seller to send me the five worst cosmetic wounds they could find. That eliminates a lot of potential purchases.
Good Ideas! Thanks

JJ
that's a really good idea!
Why does it remind me of a job interview where the applicant is asked "what's your worst trait?"...
If nothing else, it does prompt the seller to really go over the bike in detail instead of just assuming it's all in good shape.

Steve in Peoria
steelbikeguy is offline  
Old 10-14-21, 07:13 AM
  #13  
nlerner
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 14,765
Mentioned: 363 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2441 Post(s)
Liked 2,375 Times in 1,169 Posts
I was disappointed you didn't review my "buy-high, sell-low" strategy.
nlerner is offline  
Old 10-14-21, 07:50 AM
  #14  
jjhabbs 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jjhabbs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 1,595

Bikes: to many to list

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 216 Post(s)
Liked 363 Times in 121 Posts
Originally Posted by nlerner View Post
I was disappointed you didn't review my "buy-high, sell-low" strategy.
Lol. I just cant relate. I dont sell anything! LOL. I need to!

J.J.
__________________
From Illinois. Collector of many fine bicycles from all over the world. Subscribe to my Youtube channel. Just search John's vintage road bike garage
jjhabbs is offline  
Old 10-15-21, 06:53 AM
  #15  
Lostin76
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Appreciate the video! Nicely done. I recently purchased a bike from Italy and it went well, but this will help me when I biy something locally here.
Lostin76 is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.