Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Dunelt Fleur-De-Lys Information?

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Dunelt Fleur-De-Lys Information?

Old 10-20-21, 10:32 PM
  #1  
Yelbom15
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Yelbom15's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 93
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Liked 60 Times in 26 Posts
Dunelt Fleur-De-Lys Information?

Hello,

Just picked this bike up and really enjoy it however I donít have a clue what I have. Iím pretty knowledgeable on Italian bikes 1970s and onward but nothing such as this. Everything seems to be original except tires and rear derailleur. This would be the oldest bike Iíve ever owned.

Ive looked around and I found a couple old forums asking the same questions but maybe thereís some new discoveries that I might be able to learn.

(curious what the beer opener tab ďthingĒ is on the fork. Old reflector? Also why the rear hub has a single cog on the other side?Ē







Last edited by Yelbom15; 10-20-21 at 10:42 PM.
Yelbom15 is offline  
Old 10-21-21, 01:25 AM
  #2  
Insidious C. 
Crash Test Dummy
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: PNW
Posts: 1,392

Bikes: One of everything and three of everything French

Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 372 Post(s)
Liked 203 Times in 126 Posts
I have one just like yours. They don't come up often at all. Dunelt is best known for the many three speed bikes they produced. The Fleur de Lys is a better quality bike with butted 531 frame tubes. Like mine, yours has a rod actuated Cyclo Benelux front derailleur. The rear derailleur was Benelux also- yours has been swapped. Everything else looks original. My guess is it was produced in the late 50s. Warning: although the components don't look like anything special, you would pay dearly for correct replacements, so if you swap out any parts keep the originals. The bracket on the right fork blade is a lamp holder. The Resilion hub is set up with a freewheel on one side and fixed on the other. You could flip the wheel around and run fixed gear- at the risk of damaging the derailleur.

Edit: Just noticed your stem appears not inserted far enough. Not safe to ride like that, and could damage the fork steerer tube.
__________________
I.C.

Last edited by Insidious C.; 10-21-21 at 01:42 AM.
Insidious C. is offline  
Old 10-21-21, 08:06 AM
  #3  
3speedslow
Senior Member
 
3speedslow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Jacksonville, NC
Posts: 9,110

Bikes: A few

Mentioned: 114 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1880 Post(s)
Liked 815 Times in 518 Posts
A great looking machine, that one is!
3speedslow is offline  
Old 10-21-21, 09:02 AM
  #4  
Yelbom15
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Yelbom15's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 93
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Liked 60 Times in 26 Posts
Thank you for that information. The stem definitely needs to be lowered and seat raised a bit. If itís not too much to ask, would you send me a photo of the rear derailleur that is original? Iíve seen multiple listings and it may be hard to guess what would be correct on this model(if it matters).

If possible, Iíd like to see yours if you have any photos. Compare and contrast is always nice to see whatís not supposed to be there.

The light bracket on the fork? Is there a brand specific light that wouldíve came with bike?

Last edited by Yelbom15; 10-21-21 at 09:08 AM.
Yelbom15 is offline  
Old 10-21-21, 09:36 AM
  #5  
Insidious C. 
Crash Test Dummy
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: PNW
Posts: 1,392

Bikes: One of everything and three of everything French

Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 372 Post(s)
Liked 203 Times in 126 Posts
Details of mine in this thread. The correct derailleur is (I think) a Mk 7 model. Google will find pics of that for you. I have a Mk 8, not yet installed, but it is a newer model. I don't know if the bike came with a certain light or if that was not included. They did come with mud guards which were white Bluemels Club Special.

Here is more info courtesy Pete Kohler about half way down the page.

Does your serial number have an "NO" suffix?
__________________
I.C.
Insidious C. is offline  
Old 10-21-21, 09:40 AM
  #6  
3alarmer 
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 20,408

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 292 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23099 Post(s)
Liked 6,443 Times in 4,624 Posts
.
...there's a Wiki page on Dunelt here. By the time your bike was manufactured, all Dunelt branded bicycles were coming from TI Raleigh. Given it's componentry, it looks like the Dunelt branded equivalent of a Lenton Grand Prix from about 1957, maybe. Anyway, late 50's. Those front Benelux rod operated derailleurs went away in favor of cable operated ones after that. and they were not around all that long, before that all the Lentons were 3 speed IGH hubs.

I doubt the tubing is butted. Should be a straight gauge 531 frame, which is still a nice riding bicycle for the time period.

If you look at the long and somewhat detailed history of the Raleigh Lenton here, it will probably give you a few more clues about what you have. Interesting bicycle, thanks for posting photos.
3alarmer is offline  
Old 10-21-21, 09:42 AM
  #7  
3alarmer 
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 20,408

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 292 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23099 Post(s)
Liked 6,443 Times in 4,624 Posts
3alarmer is offline  
Likes For 3alarmer:
Old 10-21-21, 09:47 AM
  #8  
3alarmer 
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 20,408

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 292 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23099 Post(s)
Liked 6,443 Times in 4,624 Posts
curious what the beer opener tab “thing” is on the fork. Old reflector?
...front lamp bracket. On the right side because of the way they set up the roads in the UK.
3alarmer is offline  
Likes For 3alarmer:
Old 10-21-21, 10:39 AM
  #9  
Yelbom15
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Yelbom15's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 93
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Liked 60 Times in 26 Posts



Yelbom15 is offline  
Old 10-21-21, 10:50 AM
  #10  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 19,289

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 168 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5413 Post(s)
Liked 2,226 Times in 1,440 Posts
Iíd me tempted to build this as a 3 speed bike with an SA hub
bikemig is online now  
Old 10-21-21, 11:00 AM
  #11  
79pmooney
A Roadie Forever
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 10,226

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 111 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3299 Post(s)
Liked 2,028 Times in 1,319 Posts
Wow! Takes me back a few years! No, I never had that bike but - my first bike ever was an English bike, coaster brake. It was well used in 1960, repainted to a no-decals green. My first geared bike (and its post-theft replacement) a new Dunelt 3-speed (both Raleigh black). My friends had the "real deal", full Raleighs with a number of small differences but my Dunelt was noticeably lighter! (And yes, we all knew that Dunelt was made by Raleigh; that is was their cheaper version.)

Edit: My dad had a Willis Jeep of roughly the same age as the OP's Dunelt. And like it, stick shift on the floo , 3 gears and a low range lever with two you had to reach further for. But unlike the Dunelt, the Willis had real climbing gears! Low range, third gear, foot to the floor - maybe 15 miles per hour.

Last edited by 79pmooney; 10-21-21 at 11:12 AM.
79pmooney is offline  
Old 10-21-21, 11:18 AM
  #12  
79pmooney
A Roadie Forever
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 10,226

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 111 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3299 Post(s)
Liked 2,028 Times in 1,319 Posts
Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
Iíd me tempted to build this as a 3 speed bike with an SA hub
I'd go SA fix gear. OP, those 700c wheels? The brake pads are pushed all the way down and there is a lot of clearance over the tire front and rear, A sacrilege to some but that's how I would roll.
79pmooney is offline  
Old 10-21-21, 11:44 AM
  #13  
Yelbom15
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Yelbom15's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 93
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Liked 60 Times in 26 Posts
Insidious C. Thank you for guiding me towards the right direction. Iíll have to take a look around Ebay. What Iím seeing as possible replacements scares my wallet. On the dropout there is a stamp on the drop out showing Ď212NOí Early production?


3alarmer Iím curious on my drive train then. The bottom bracket shell does have two cable guides on both sides as well as an oil fill cap. Was this drivetrain the cheaper alternative back in the day? I take it they mass produced the same shell and then worried about what the customer wanted installed later.
Yelbom15 is offline  
Old 10-21-21, 11:50 AM
  #14  
Yelbom15
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Yelbom15's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 93
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Liked 60 Times in 26 Posts
79pmooney Ill probably still be slower than your dads Jeep on this thing! Iíll be lucky enough to pull 14 mph even with good wind. Lol

And when you mean cheaper version, was this them just trying to wash out Dunelt out of their company. I figured Reynolds 531 tubing and the beautiful accents at all the seams looked fairly expensive to me because Iíve seen some
hideous looking Raleighs!

bikemig I couldnít tell you where Iíll start with this. Im not too sure if I want to make it an urban commuter or something a little more touring oriented. 79pmooney These are 27Ē tires but luckily the market is bringing these tires back. I may be able to source some wider tires with the amount of clearance I have here.
Yelbom15 is offline  
Old 10-21-21, 01:29 PM
  #15  
3alarmer 
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 20,408

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 292 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23099 Post(s)
Liked 6,443 Times in 4,624 Posts
Originally Posted by Yelbom15 View Post


3alarmer Iím curious on my drive train then. The bottom bracket shell does have two cable guides on both sides as well as an oil fill cap. Was this drivetrain the cheaper alternative back in the day? I take it they mass produced the same shell and then worried about what the customer wanted installed later.
...I honestly have no idea about cable guides on there. If they are present, and brazed in place, it might make your frame newer, and retrofitted with the current setup. Obviously, the rear derailleur is something cheap that has been fitted as a replacement. The guide on the right side, also obviously, is usable either as a guide for the current rear derailleur cable, or is also usable for a SA IGH. Not sure what's the story on the non drive side.But the fact that it has that Benelux DT shifter makes me think it came originally with a Benelux rear derailleur.
3alarmer is offline  
Old 10-21-21, 03:10 PM
  #16  
79pmooney
A Roadie Forever
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 10,226

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 111 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3299 Post(s)
Liked 2,028 Times in 1,319 Posts
Originally Posted by Yelbom15 View Post
79pmooney Ill probably still be slower than your dads Jeep on this thing! Iíll be lucky enough to pull 14 mph even with good wind. Lol

And when you mean cheaper version, was this them just trying to wash out Dunelt out of their company. I figured Reynolds 531 tubing and the beautiful accents at all the seams looked fairly expensive to me because Iíve seen some
hideous looking Raleighs!

bikemig I couldnít tell you where Iíll start with this. Im not too sure if I want to make it an urban commuter or something a little more touring oriented. 79pmooney These are 27Ē tires but luckily the market is bringing these tires back. I may be able to source some wider tires with the amount of clearance I have here.
My Dunelt was a 1965 3-speed. I believe Raleigh did with Dunelt what they did with Carleton; over time use them more and more as additional manufacturing capacity whereas in the early years after takeover Carleton at least was still their own shop with their own bikes. Your bike looks like an interesting bike. Doesn't say "Raleigh" to me at all. Mine looked like the Raleigh Roadster(? did I get that right?) until you started at details.
79pmooney is offline  
Old 10-21-21, 03:56 PM
  #17  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 8,825

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400, 2013 Novara Randonee, 1990 Trek 970

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2052 Post(s)
Liked 1,996 Times in 1,242 Posts
Originally Posted by 79pmooney View Post
Edit: My dad had a Willis Jeep of roughly the same age as the OP's Dunelt. And like it, stick shift on the floor , 3 gears and a low range lever with two you had to reach further for. But unlike the Dunelt, the Willis had real climbing gears! Low range, third gear, foot to the floor - maybe 15 miles per hour.
Those were transfer case levers. One engaged the front axle and the second shifted the transfer case into low/neutral/high. Low range should only be used in 1st & reverse so you didn't break things. Neutral was often used to run PTO driven equipment (pumps, generators, saws, etc.) with the vehicle remaining stationary. Those levers went away in the 70's when transfer cases started using a single lever with linkage to combine the 2. I miss my 67 Scout, small V8, 4 spd, posi F&R. Thing was a stump puller.

Staying on point lights could be battery like this one or generator run.

​​​​​​
dedhed is offline  
Likes For dedhed:
Old 10-21-21, 05:26 PM
  #18  
clubman 
Youngman Grand
 
clubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 8,067

Bikes: roadsters, club bikes, fixed and classic

Mentioned: 117 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2029 Post(s)
Liked 1,324 Times in 859 Posts
This is not one of the Raleigh rebrands. It's a Birmingham bike and the Williams crank will have the date code, likely around '57 imo. Also, it's not double butted but plain gauge Reynolds.

OP, do the rims have any markings? They look like stainless.
clubman is offline  
Old 10-21-21, 06:45 PM
  #19  
Yelbom15
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Yelbom15's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 93
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Liked 60 Times in 26 Posts
The cranks I canít really make out. I see ď48Ē and ď49Ē which I take is the tooth count and what looks to be a rocket that shows EBW and of course the name Williams stamped. The rims states ďDunlop. Special Lightweight. Made in EnglandĒ



Yelbom15 is offline  
Old 10-21-21, 06:55 PM
  #20  
3alarmer 
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 20,408

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 292 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23099 Post(s)
Liked 6,443 Times in 4,624 Posts
Originally Posted by clubman View Post
This is not one of the Raleigh rebrands. It's a Birmingham bike and the Williams crank will have the date code, likely around '57 imo. Also, it's not double butted but plain gauge Reynolds.

OP, do the rims have any markings? They look like stainless.
...I assumed they were probably the 27: stainless Dunlop rims that were used on most of these. The "all authentic and original" guys apparently pay a lot for them on the used marketplace. I tried to ride mine for a while using them, and found them hopelessly slow wheels. They are much heavier than the alloy rims I used as replacements, and they have no bead hook. That was about as good as you could do in the late 50's, unless you went tubular. But you can so improve the ride and performance by replacing them with a 27" alloy wheel, with a bead hook and 27" Panaracer tyres, it wasn't at all difficult to let them go.

I agree that the TI Raleigh company was still making bikes in Birmingham, at the old Raynal facility, when this was probably made. Kind of a standard club bike of the times.
3alarmer is offline  
Old 10-21-21, 07:00 PM
  #21  
3alarmer 
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 20,408

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 292 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23099 Post(s)
Liked 6,443 Times in 4,624 Posts
.
...Williams is a pretty nice cottered crank of the time. I have one on a Carleton Catalina from about 1963. It will probably clean up nicely. See above for what I know about Dunlop stainless wheel rims. Don't toss them, but it's impossible to get a modern, higher pressure tyre to full inflation on them, without it blowing off the rim.

3alarmer is offline  
Old 10-21-21, 07:00 PM
  #22  
Insidious C. 
Crash Test Dummy
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: PNW
Posts: 1,392

Bikes: One of everything and three of everything French

Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 372 Post(s)
Liked 203 Times in 126 Posts
Originally Posted by Yelbom15 View Post
Insidious C. Thank you for guiding me towards the right direction. Iíll have to take a look around Ebay. What Iím seeing as possible replacements scares my wallet. On the dropout there is a stamp on the drop out showing Ď212NOí Early production?


3alarmer Iím curious on my drive train then. The bottom bracket shell does have two cable guides on both sides as well as an oil fill cap. Was this drivetrain the cheaper alternative back in the day? I take it they mass produced the same shell and then worried about what the customer wanted installed later.
I asked about the "NO" s/n because I noticed an Armstrong posted by FTwelder and my FdL both have this. I think both brands belonged to TI at the time your bike was made. These may also have been built by Phillips, as Peter Kohler suggested.

There is mixed info about the tubing being butted or plain. My bike takes a 27.2 seatpost which suggests butted. If you know your seatpost diameter (without shim) please share.
__________________
I.C.
Insidious C. is offline  
Old 10-21-21, 07:15 PM
  #23  
clubman 
Youngman Grand
 
clubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 8,067

Bikes: roadsters, club bikes, fixed and classic

Mentioned: 117 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2029 Post(s)
Liked 1,324 Times in 859 Posts
Originally Posted by clubman View Post
This is not one of the Raleigh rebrands. It's a Birmingham bike and the Williams crank will have the date code, likely around '57 imo. Also, it's not double butted but plain gauge Reynolds.

OP, do the rims have any markings? They look like stainless.
Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
...I assumed they were probably the 27: stainless Dunlop rims that were used on most of these. The "all authentic and original" guys apparently pay a lot for them on the used marketplace. I tried to ride mine for a while using them, and found them hopelessly slow wheels. They are much heavier than the alloy rims I used as replacements, and they have no bead hook. That was about as good as you could do in the late 50's, unless you went tubular. But you can so improve the ride and performance by replacing them with a 27" alloy wheel, with a bead hook and 27" Panaracer tyres, it wasn't at all difficult to let them go.

I agree that the TI Raleigh company was still making bikes in Birmingham, at the old Raynal facility, when this was probably made. Kind of a standard club bike of the times.
The Williams date code is 1960 which is the cusp of the Raleigh-Birmingham takeover. It's happened on many occasions that Birmingham-specific inventory was sold by Raleigh after that date. When the stock was gone, you would have seen England on the Dunelt badge and the rear mudguard eyelets would have been behind the axle and not above, as seen in the OP's frame. I've never seen those serrated shorelines on any Raleigh lugs. It was a transitional time for these bikes.

Once Raleigh had full control of inventory, they changed to this badge, from the Birmingham.



Last edited by clubman; 10-21-21 at 07:24 PM.
clubman is offline  
Old 10-21-21, 07:34 PM
  #24  
clubman 
Youngman Grand
 
clubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 8,067

Bikes: roadsters, club bikes, fixed and classic

Mentioned: 117 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2029 Post(s)
Liked 1,324 Times in 859 Posts
Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
...I assumed they were probably the 27: stainless Dunlop rims that were used on most of these. The "all authentic and original" guys apparently pay a lot for them on the used marketplace. I tried to ride mine for a while using them, and found them hopelessly slow wheels. They are much heavier than the alloy rims I used as replacements, and they have no bead hook. That was about as good as you could do in the late 50's, unless you went tubular. But you can so improve the ride and performance by replacing them with a 27" alloy wheel, with a bead hook and 27" Panaracer tyres, it wasn't at all difficult to let them go.

I agree that the TI Raleigh company was still making bikes in Birmingham, at the old Raynal facility, when this was probably made. Kind of a standard club bike of the times.
You're right about the Raynal factory...I had always assumed the transition took place close to 1960 when the rest of Birmingham was absorbed. Cool.
clubman is offline  
Old 10-21-21, 07:36 PM
  #25  
Yelbom15
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Yelbom15's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 93
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Liked 60 Times in 26 Posts
clubman I agree and may have found that answer as well. Once rubbing away a crank, I believe I see a Raleigh logo on the non-drive side. Itís either a man on a horse/bike or something totally else but I do see a very distinctive R in the logo.

3alarmer Iíve heard good things about WillIams cranks. If anything, the highest end modern cranks such as White Industries or Phil take after the geometry a lot it looks like. Strange to see a small distinct stamp of Raleigh on the non-drive side crank(if thatís what it is). Maybe a small way to keep count of their productions without giving away the Dunelt legacy.

I also have to agree on the rims. I just finished 40 miles today on this bike and Iíve got to say the entire time I was looking down thinking I had a flat. Taking a turn felt terribly squirrelly to me but had me on my toes. I may look around for some old Mavic rims unless that sacrilegious. Iím open to any all suggestions.

Insidious C. I had a 27.2 seat post laying around. It fit but really tight so I didnít bother causing more problems. Itís a real cheap one I yanked off an All-City frame I had laying around. May not be a 27.2 diameter.


Yelbom15 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.