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Vintage Update

Old 10-25-21, 02:25 PM
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Bmdvpro
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Vintage Update

Hey all! I run a 1986 Schwinn World Sport that I "restored" after purchasing second hand. I've ridden it for about 8-10 years now and am looking to update some of the components in the coming month. I initially wanted to upgrade my cockpit area, but after finding a carbon bar I liked I realized I'd basically need an entire new groupset (unless I'm misunderstanding something.) I know people update vintage frame sets as I've seen many on this and other blogs/forums, but most I've seen have little info in the way of what to look for. I'd ideally keep my wheels, but I'm not even sure that's possible due to it having a 5 speed cassette. I've built and maintained bikes from a young age, but I come from a BMX background, so things like derailleurs, shifters, and dimensions of road bikes can be a bit above me. So any advice anyone may have in general would be greatly appreciated.

The problem initially began when I realized a new set of bars required a new stem which in turn would require me to move my current shifters from the stem to somewhere else, preferably brifters. I found a pair (Micronew SB-R472 Double 2x7 Speed road bike shifter brake levers on Amazon) I thought would work until I did some research and it looks like they won't work with my old derailleur. However, as far as I can tell, I can't get a new derailleur without a new cassette or wheels since my current set up has a 5 speed cassette. Which is just as confusing to me since I've seen people having to bend their frames to get larger hubs to fit. I guess I'm really just looking for input or advice from anyone that's gone the route of updating a vintage frame set. Thanks.
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Old 10-25-21, 02:49 PM
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I don't want to rain on your parade but updating such a low-end bike with modern parts is rarely a good idea. I mean, carbon bars aren't going to do anything except make a 29 lb bike a 28.5 lb bike. It won't ride any different. If you want brifters it will require a new rear wheel, new rear derailleur, new cables, and a new chain at least. Then it will be a huge pain getting it all to work on a bike with stamped dropouts and a claw hanger. If you really like this bike and want to make it the best it can be I would suggest finding nice parts from the era of the bike (or just slightly newer) and putting those parts on instead of trying to shoehorn a bunch of modern parts onto it. Replace anything steel with aluminum. Get a nice set of wheels and tires, those dictate how a bike rides/feels more than anything else.
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Old 10-25-21, 03:14 PM
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By 1986 that bike should have been 6 speed freewheel (not cassette)
6-7 speed used 126mm rear spacing.

Specs also show Positron RD.
​​​​​​https://waterfordbikes.com/SchwinnCa...986Ltwt31.html

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Old 10-25-21, 03:28 PM
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Oh strange, it actually is a freewheel, but it definitely is only a 5 speed. Perhaps the OG owner swapped wheels?
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Old 10-25-21, 09:16 PM
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Originally Posted by degan View Post
I don't want to rain on your parade but updating such a low-end bike with modern parts is rarely a good idea. I mean, carbon bars aren't going to do anything except make a 29 lb bike a 28.5 lb bike. It won't ride any different. If you want brifters it will require a new rear wheel, new rear derailleur, new cables, and a new chain at least. Then it will be a huge pain getting it all to work on a bike with stamped dropouts and a claw hanger. If you really like this bike and want to make it the best it can be I would suggest finding nice parts from the era of the bike (or just slightly newer) and putting those parts on instead of trying to shoehorn a bunch of modern parts onto it. Replace anything steel with aluminum. Get a nice set of wheels and tires, those dictate how a bike rides/feels more than anything else.
You are quite wrong on a lot of things here. By 1986 the World Sport was a pretty decent bike.... double butted cromo frame and forged dropouts.

OP, try out the Micronew/microshift 7 speed brifters and a 7 speed freewheel. If the wheel set is original, the 7 speed freewheel will probably fit without any issue. You may need to upgrade the chain and rear derailleur... I've successfully gotten the Light Action RD that bike came with to index on a 6 speed but not sure it will index properly on a 7 speed where the required tolerances are a little tighter, but give it a shot. Worst case scenario you'll need to spend another ~$40 on a new chain and derailleur.
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Old 10-25-21, 09:24 PM
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Forge ahead but be willing to spend with no reward. I really suggest reading a bunch on sheldonbrown.com to get familiar with the compatibilities and non compatibilities before spending your hard earned money
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Old 10-25-21, 10:34 PM
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Originally Posted by degan View Post
I don't want to rain on your parade but updating such a low-end bike with modern parts is rarely a good idea...
Yep... and allot of us have done it. But ya know its always fun adding new stuff to your old bike. Sometimes it even makes it go faster. Most of the times its best to start with a good frame if nothing else. Or a vintage bike with good bones (frame, wheel set, crank...) and exchange and add on from there. All the bikes I ride have been frankenised but I do have a wall hangar restored PR-10 that's I'm just itching to part out because I don't ride it. So I guess the question is, are you making a wall hanger or a rider?
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Old 10-26-21, 02:12 AM
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Originally Posted by zandoval View Post
Yep... and allot of us have done it.
Yes of course, all my bikes are "Frankenstein" bikes as well. The trouble is that clearly the OP isn't extremely familiar with these bikes and parts and so I wouldn't want him to get a bunch of parts that are going to be nearly impossible to get to work on his bike, namely getting brifters to work on a stamped dropout bike. Not to mention getting a RD to shift well while also being further outboard because of the width of the claw. Thats why I suggested getting nice parts from the era or slightly newer, not like lightyears newer.

Originally Posted by PatTheSlat View Post
You are quite wrong on a lot of things here. By 1986 the World Sport was a pretty decent bike.... double butted cromo frame and forged dropouts.
I think the OP might be off on the age because in 1986 it came with downtube shifters which the OP's bike doesn't have. The bike actually being older would also explain it having a 5 speed instead of a 6 speed freewheel. All I know, from experience, is trying to get brifters to work on a bike with a claw hanger is an insane PITA. If it has forged dropouts the thats a giant hurdle out of the way, but before you go telling him to get this or that I'd confirm that it does have forged dropouts.
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Old 10-26-21, 03:10 AM
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@Bmdvpro do you have pictures of your ride? A 1986 World Sport would have (for the rest of us) come in red or charcoal gray. I had a 1985 World Sport that was way too small for me, but was the start of all of this adult-era biking, C&V being a very large part of it. Ten posts to be able to post photos (or post in your own user album, which I've never done, but then we can be linked to it and post it here in the thread for you).
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Old 10-26-21, 09:51 AM
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Originally Posted by PatTheSlat View Post
You are quite wrong on a lot of things here. By 1986 the World Sport was a pretty decent bike.... double butted cromo frame and forged dropouts.

OP, try out the Micronew/microshift 7 speed brifters and a 7 speed freewheel. If the wheel set is original, the 7 speed freewheel will probably fit without any issue. You may need to upgrade the chain and rear derailleur... I've successfully gotten the Light Action RD that bike came with to index on a 6 speed but not sure it will index properly on a 7 speed where the required tolerances are a little tighter, but give it a shot. Worst case scenario you'll need to spend another ~$40 on a new chain and derailleur.
Those were actually the ones I was looking at! I was planning to drop some money into the update anyway, is that doesn't sound too bad.

Originally Posted by repechage View Post
Forge ahead but be willing to spend with no reward. I really suggest reading a bunch on sheldonbrown.com to get familiar with the compatibilities and non compatibilities before spending your hard earned money
I will check out that site for sure, thanks!

Originally Posted by zandoval View Post
Yep... and allot of us have done it. But ya know its always fun adding new stuff to your old bike. Sometimes it even makes it go faster. Most of the times its best to start with a good frame if nothing else. Or a vintage bike with good bones (frame, wheel set, crank...) and exchange and add on from there. All the bikes I ride have been frankenised but I do have a wall hangar restored PR-10 that's I'm just itching to part out because I don't ride it. So I guess the question is, are you making a wall hanger or a rider?
Definitely will be riding this! Really all I'm hoping for is a slightly lighter/tighter ride.

Originally Posted by degan View Post
Yes of course, all my bikes are "Frankenstein" bikes as well. The trouble is that clearly the OP isn't extremely familiar with these bikes and parts and so I wouldn't want him to get a bunch of parts that are going to be nearly impossible to get to work on his bike, namely getting brifters to work on a stamped dropout bike. Not to mention getting a RD to shift well while also being further outboard because of the width of the claw. Thats why I suggested getting nice parts from the era or slightly newer, not like lightyears newer.



I think the OP might be off on the age because in 1986 it came with downtube shifters which the OP's bike doesn't have. The bike actually being older would also explain it having a 5 speed instead of a 6 speed freewheel. All I know, from experience, is trying to get brifters to work on a bike with a claw hanger is an insane PITA. If it has forged dropouts the thats a giant hurdle out of the way, but before you go telling him to get this or that I'd confirm that it does have forged dropouts.
It's almost certainly a 1986. Between posting another thread on here and using the head tube badge / OG color and decals as reference all signs have said 1986. Also, looking in the 1986 catalogue the World Sport most definitely had the shifters on the stem still.
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Old 10-26-21, 09:57 AM
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Originally Posted by RiddleOfSteel View Post
@Bmdvpro do you have pictures of your ride? A 1986 World Sport would have (for the rest of us) come in red or charcoal gray. I had a 1985 World Sport that was way too small for me, but was the start of all of this adult-era biking, C&V being a very large part of it. Ten posts to be able to post photos (or post in your own user album, which I've never done, but then we can be linked to it and post it here in the thread for you).
Yes, it was the same red color with those same OG decals when I bought it. Though, I've since have painted it since it was in a bit of a rough shape when I got it. The frame size/feel is perfect for me. Mostly why I'd like to upgrade this one. I will look into posting photos, thanks for the info.
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Old 10-26-21, 10:40 AM
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Bmdvpro , I just recently upgraded some things on my 83 Le Tour. My original gearing was 2x6 and my original crank was 144 BCD and 42/52 chainrings. I really wanted to get a bit lower gearing for hill climbing, but my OE derailleurs were not going to work. I ended up with 3x6 gearing, a new triple crankset with 28/38/48 chainrings. I didn't think I would want to go to the trouble of adapting Indexed shifting and modern parts needed. My newer derailleurs are Suntour Cyclone GT in the rear with Suntour ARX in the front. The OE Schwinn stem shifters didn't have the ability to shift my newer Suntour derailleurs, so I replaced them with Suntour Powershifters.
A couple of pics of the new stuff,



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Old 10-26-21, 10:58 AM
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Originally Posted by daverup View Post
Bmdvpro , I just recently upgraded some things on my 83 Le Tour. My original gearing was 2x6 and my original crank was 144 BCD and 42/52 chainrings. I really wanted to get a bit lower gearing for hill climbing, but my OE derailleurs were not going to work. I ended up with 3x6 gearing, a new triple crankset with 28/38/48 chainrings. I didn't think I would want to go to the trouble of adapting Indexed shifting and modern parts needed. My newer derailleurs are Suntour Cyclone GT in the rear with Suntour ARX in the front. The OE Schwinn stem shifters didn't have the ability to shift my newer Suntour derailleurs, so I replaced them with Suntour Powershifters.
A couple of pics of the new stuff,
Looks clean!
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Old 10-26-21, 12:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Bmdvpro View Post
Yes, it was the same red color with those same OG decals when I bought it. Though, I've since have painted it since it was in a bit of a rough shape when I got it. The frame size/feel is perfect for me. Mostly why I'd like to upgrade this one. I will look into posting photos, thanks for the info.
Since you aren't running a claw derailleur hanger (1985 was also no-claw), then you're at a decent 1970's bike level for braze-ons and compatibility. Those World Sports have the downtube cable stops, which is perfect for stem shifters, bar end shifters, or STI/Ergo brifters. They, IIRC, take a normal 22.2mm quill stem and a 26.6mm seatpost. Basically, upgrading this, to whatever level you want, is not only possible, but not that difficult given frame/component standards. Going to brifters is involved, yes, as others have pointed out, but if you love the bike, this makes it easier to do. It's already painted, and the need to paint (rough shape) lines up with the odd 5-speed freewheel use etc. Lower-end bikes get ridden by the masses, and those masses either don't have any education as to bicycles or just do patently illogical things to them, and then store them outside in the rain for years and wonder why they don't work well. A number do care for them, but even then they'll never make financial sense to upgrade in lieu of selling them. Keeping them? Doesn't matter--upgrade away! I would make sure to take measurement of where your saddle and brake levers are relative to fixed points on the frame (or to each other), depending on how extensive you'll change things out. That will help keep the comfort level and familiarity and let you concentrate on how the new components/setup functions.

I'm in the middle of taking a neglected Trek 420 and putting Shimano Claris (R2000 generation) on it. My plan is to sell it at some point, and I'll probably just break even, which is fine with me. Maybe I'll get a wild idea and keep it. The Claris shifters are a beautiful design (basically the same as high end Dura-Ace in shifter body design, just heavier and with fewer speeds) and can go on new and older bar shapes and still be comfortable as the shifter body is long enough to pretty much support your whole palm. Older designs, including Microshift, don't have as long a lever body, and thus can be tricky to set up in such a way as to be comfortable. Again, once you get 10 posts, then we can see how yours is set up and how you like the comfort of it--some people are fine with whatever, and others like something else.

For reference for everyone else:

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Old 10-26-21, 06:41 PM
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Originally Posted by RiddleOfSteel View Post
Since you aren't running a claw derailleur hanger (1985 was also no-claw), then you're at a decent 1970's bike level for braze-ons and compatibility. Those World Sports have the downtube cable stops, which is perfect for stem shifters, bar end shifters, or STI/Ergo brifters. They, IIRC, take a normal 22.2mm quill stem and a 26.6mm seatpost. Basically, upgrading this, to whatever level you want, is not only possible, but not that difficult given frame/component standards. Going to brifters is involved, yes, as others have pointed out, but if you love the bike, this makes it easier to do. It's already painted, and the need to paint (rough shape) lines up with the odd 5-speed freewheel use etc. Lower-end bikes get ridden by the masses, and those masses either don't have any education as to bicycles or just do patently illogical things to them, and then store them outside in the rain for years and wonder why they don't work well. A number do care for them, but even then they'll never make financial sense to upgrade in lieu of selling them. Keeping them? Doesn't matter--upgrade away! I would make sure to take measurement of where your saddle and brake levers are relative to fixed points on the frame (or to each other), depending on how extensive you'll change things out. That will help keep the comfort level and familiarity and let you concentrate on how the new components/setup functions.

I'm in the middle of taking a neglected Trek 420 and putting Shimano Claris (R2000 generation) on it. My plan is to sell it at some point, and I'll probably just break even, which is fine with me. Maybe I'll get a wild idea and keep it. The Claris shifters are a beautiful design (basically the same as high end Dura-Ace in shifter body design, just heavier and with fewer speeds) and can go on new and older bar shapes and still be comfortable as the shifter body is long enough to pretty much support your whole palm. Older designs, including Microshift, don't have as long a lever body, and thus can be tricky to set up in such a way as to be comfortable. Again, once you get 10 posts, then we can see how yours is set up and how you like the comfort of it--some people are fine with whatever, and others like something else.

For reference for everyone else:
Yes! That's the one. Thanks so much for the info. The levers, oddly enough, are also where part of the idea to update came from. Ive only been running a back brake for a while, coming from bmx this actually wasn't a huge deal to me, but I decided it's time to put front brakes back on. Which would require new levers anyway as I do not remember where I stored the front when I took it off haha.
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Old 10-26-21, 06:43 PM
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Pics for reference since I hit 10:






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Old 10-27-21, 04:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Bmdvpro View Post
Pics for reference since I hit 10:
Definitely a replacement rear wheel, original would have been quick release according to the catalog. Where on earth is your front brake?
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Old 10-28-21, 09:00 AM
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Originally Posted by PatTheSlat View Post
Definitely a replacement rear wheel, original would have been quick release according to the catalog. Where on earth is your front brake?
Yeah, yesterday I ended up ordering new wheels to just start from scratch since these, at least the back for sure, are steel. Haha, I knew someone would catch that. When I first got this bike I was transitioning from BMX that I had done for many years. I never had front brakes and took them off this bike on the first restore. I've actually been riding this for about 10 years now with no front brake and have never had trouble stopping on a dime. Any way, no need to fret, they will be going back on with this revision, haha.
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Old 10-28-21, 10:25 AM
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i suggest you start buying bikes, that's what we all do and end up with more than you can sensibly ride lol, it sounds like you have history with the bike and don't want to get rid of it which is cool, have you thought about buying a second bike with the features you are looking for? and just keep both? you could even buy a fixer upper, and that way when you are making things work, adjusting, or upgrading, and something gets jacked up you have your other bike to fall back on.

just a thought.
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Old 10-28-21, 11:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Bmdvpro View Post
Yeah, yesterday I ended up ordering new wheels to just start from scratch since these, at least the back for sure, are steel. Haha, I knew someone would catch that. When I first got this bike I was transitioning from BMX that I had done for many years. I never had front brakes and took them off this bike on the first restore. I've actually been riding this for about 10 years now with no front brake and have never had trouble stopping on a dime. Any way, no need to fret, they will be going back on with this revision, haha.
On drive pavement, the front brake will provide 70 percent of your braking power. I would absolutely not ride a bicycle in traffic or in a hilly area without a front brake. I typically use either the front brake alone or both brakes together. The only time using the front by itself got me into trouble was on a very wet, slippery surface, where I should have been using both brakes evenly to reduce the chance of a skid on either wheel.
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Old 10-29-21, 03:09 PM
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Thanks for everyone's help! I think I've figured out the build. If anyone with the knowledge would be so kind as to take a look and check for any incompatibilities, I'd be grateful. Also, as before, any advice/part suggestions are welcome.

I purchased these wheels: wheels

These are the components I'm looking about getting for the update.

This 6 speed freewheel: freewheel

This 6/7 speed derailleur the looks to work with my bolt on type frame: derailleur

These brifters: brifter

As far as I can tell these should all work together, but I'd love to get some of your guys expert opinions. I'm also still not sure about the front derailleur (if I'll need a new one), so any additional advice would be super helpful. And once again thank you all for sharing your knowledge with the rest of us. It's greatly appreciated!
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Old 10-30-21, 09:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Bmdvpro View Post
Thanks for everyone's help! I think I've figured out the build. If anyone with the knowledge would be so kind as to take a look and check for any incompatibilities, I'd be grateful. Also, as before, any advice/part suggestions are welcome.

I purchased these wheels: wheels

These are the components I'm looking about getting for the update.

This 6 speed freewheel: freewheel

This 6/7 speed derailleur the looks to work with my bolt on type frame: derailleur

These brifters: brifter

As far as I can tell these should all work together, but I'd love to get some of your guys expert opinions. I'm also still not sure about the front derailleur (if I'll need a new one), so any additional advice would be super helpful. And once again thank you all for sharing your knowledge with the rest of us. It's greatly appreciated!
Oh boy, if you already purchased those wheels you missed a great opportunity to switch to 700c instead of 27".

The brifters are fine but for the freewheel and derailleur I think you could probably find better deals at a local shop, or WAY better deals buying used on here... plus there are a lot of counterfeit Shimano parts on Amazon. Even if it ends up not being a counterfeit the rear derailleur you've selected is pretty low quality and will be a downgrade in shifting performance from what you already have on there.
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Old 10-30-21, 09:40 AM
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Good luck on the update!

I had an 84 World Sport- it was a fine bike for what it was- CrMo main tubes, Hi-Ten fork and stays, Suntour AR drivetrain, SR crank, and DiaCompe most everything else.
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Old 10-30-21, 10:08 AM
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Bmdvpro
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Originally Posted by PatTheSlat View Post
Oh boy, if you already purchased those wheels you missed a great opportunity to switch to 700c instead of 27".

The brifters are fine but for the freewheel and derailleur I think you could probably find better deals at a local shop, or WAY better deals buying used on here... plus there are a lot of counterfeit Shimano parts on Amazon. Even if it ends up not being a counterfeit the rear derailleur you've selected is pretty low quality and will be a downgrade in shifting performance from what you already have on there.
Yes! This is why I wanted to ask here. Haha.

I did stick to 27 on purpose. I had read about issues with 700 having newer hubs mostly. So I figured in that dept. just stick to the OG specs and hopefully it'll be the last wheel set I but anyway.

As far as the derailleur, that's where I'm having most of my issues. I just don't know what to look for. I'd honestly be in to keeping mine, but the little info I've found has led me to believe it will not work with brifters. I'm assuming that is correct because I have not heard differently. Are there any recommendations for a 6 speed derailleur I should be looking for? My issue is even if I were to look on here or for used, I'm not sure how to know if they work with my setup/ ideal build.
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Old 10-30-21, 10:27 AM
  #25  
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I also found this derailleur: here but could not find much info/reviews on it.
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