Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Iron Man Master weight weenie diet

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Iron Man Master weight weenie diet

Old 10-26-21, 09:12 AM
  #1  
capnjonny 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
capnjonny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Saratoga calif.
Posts: 894

Bikes: Miyata 610(66cm), GT Vantara Hybrid (64cm), Nishiki International (64cm), Peugeot rat rod (62 cm), Trek 800 Burning Man helicopter bike, Bob Jackson frame (to be restored?) plus a never ending stream of neglected waifs from the Bike exchange.

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 289 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 293 Times in 128 Posts
Iron Man Master weight weenie diet

I have been playing minor weight weenie games with the 54 cm 1988 Iron man Master.

It came into my shop complete weighing 21.8 lbs .

Swapping in some killer aero spoke DT Swiss wheels and tires (with tubes) , a lighter Specialized seat post , and a Stella Italia Racing saddle has brought it down to 20.4lbs.

My next weenieness is going to be weighing some brakes to see if anything I have(Suntour supreme?) is lighter than the Shimano tricolor. Switching to 1x9 might also take off a couple ounces.

I have some light bars and a couple other things I am going to try that might even crack the 20 lb. barrier without going bat **** crazy.

I am thinking about going to 9x1 with flat bars and thumb shifters for a hipster bike.

I checked out the values on the internet and based on the paint condition and the market , don't think i am going to do a restore on it. With the mods It should make some one of smaller stature a killer city bike though.

Has anyone else moded an Iron man ? what did you do?

Last edited by capnjonny; 10-26-21 at 09:16 AM.
capnjonny is offline  
Old 10-26-21, 09:25 AM
  #2  
T-Mar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 22,881
Mentioned: 607 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4536 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2,673 Times in 1,688 Posts
Swap the frame for a Centurion Prestige and put Ironman decals on it.
T-Mar is offline  
Old 10-26-21, 09:26 AM
  #3  
tiger1964 
Senior Member
 
tiger1964's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 1,678

Bikes: Drysdale/Gitane/Zeus/Masi/Falcon/Palo Alto

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 605 Post(s)
Liked 238 Times in 174 Posts
Originally Posted by capnjonny View Post

I am thinking about going to 9x1 with flat bars and thumb shifters for a hipster bike.
9x1 means shifter, singular, not plural, no? Thus even more weight loss?
__________________
Larry:1958 Drysdale, 1961 Gitane Gran Sport, 1974 Zeus track, 1988 Masi Gran Corsa, 1974 Falcon, 1980 Palo Alto. Susan: 1976 Windsor Profesional.
tiger1964 is offline  
Likes For tiger1964:
Old 10-26-21, 09:37 AM
  #4  
nlerner
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 15,747
Mentioned: 404 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2996 Post(s)
Liked 3,843 Times in 1,692 Posts
How about a pic?

Carbon seatpost and bars would take a bit off (assuming you could find bars that work with your existing stem, which I would guess has a 25.4mm clamp). There's always Ti hardware bits to drop some weight though not a less expensive route to take.
nlerner is offline  
Likes For nlerner:
Old 10-26-21, 09:48 AM
  #5  
ThermionicScott 
working on my sandal tan
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 22,050

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers), All-City Space Horse (hers)

Mentioned: 95 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3628 Post(s)
Liked 2,058 Times in 1,306 Posts
Cool, I love weight-weenie projects. No matter how futile they may seem in some eyes.

Got a full build sheet we can pick apart?
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is offline  
Old 10-26-21, 09:52 AM
  #6  
icemilkcoffee 
Senior Member
 
icemilkcoffee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,263
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 745 Post(s)
Liked 577 Times in 354 Posts
Did you use an adapter sleeve for that seatpost? It's pretty hard to find carbon seatposts in sizes other than 27.2. I have a 25.4mm carbon seatpost in my Ironman with an adapter sleeve but I don't recommend it- it slips.
What handlebar are you running? If it's plain ole Nitto/SR type untreated aluminum then you can easily save 120+g by switching to a 200g 7075 T6 aluminum bar, or like me a 180g carbon bar (although I don't recommend 26.0mm carbon bars neither -they slip). Likewise the stem. A typical Nitto 'forged' aluminum stem probably weighs 300-330g. A CrMo quill stem could knock 100g off of that. My HL crMo 90mm quill stem weighs 220g.
Another one is the bottom bracket. A typical Shimano UN55 type BB is probably 300+ g. A chinese titanium BB is about 150g if I recall. I have one on my Nishiki Linear and it works just fine. Going to lighter Ti quick release skewers can save you close to 100g. But unfortunately they don't work with our 126mm rear dropout space. If you've spread it open to 130mm (which I will never ever recommend) then they would work.

Last edited by icemilkcoffee; 10-26-21 at 09:59 AM.
icemilkcoffee is offline  
Old 10-26-21, 10:37 AM
  #7  
seypat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 7,191
Mentioned: 66 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2431 Post(s)
Liked 1,494 Times in 968 Posts
For mods, check the Ironman thread. Plenty of ideas there.

Post your Centurion Ironman.. For the love of 80s paint jobs!

+1 to what T-Mar said. My 54 Prestige came to me weighing 19.94lbs.
seypat is offline  
Old 10-26-21, 10:56 AM
  #8  
davester
Senior Member
 
davester's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Berkeley CA
Posts: 2,286

Bikes: 1981 Ron Cooper, 1974 Cinelli Speciale Corsa, 2000 Gary Fisher Sugar 1, 1986 Miyata 710, 1982 Raleigh "International"

Mentioned: 86 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 790 Post(s)
Liked 794 Times in 337 Posts
Skip breakfast for a few weeks and get twice the weight savings of your current efforts.
davester is offline  
Likes For davester:
Old 10-26-21, 12:37 PM
  #9  
rjhammett
Senior Member
 
rjhammett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Saint Paul, Minnesota
Posts: 2,295

Bikes: 92 Colnago Master PIU, 83 Pinarello Record, 92 Tommaso, 92 Merckx MX Leader, 90 Serotta Colorado II, 99 Tommasini Sintesi, 90 Pinarello Montello, 89 Tommasini Super Prestige, 08 Look 585, 89 Merckx Corsa Extra, 72 Holdsworth Professional and 3 more

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 309 Post(s)
Liked 382 Times in 179 Posts
I love it when weight weenies claim that they got their bike under xx pounds without pedals. I haven't tried riding a bike without pedals but I don't think it would work too well.
rjhammett is offline  
Likes For rjhammett:
Old 10-26-21, 12:49 PM
  #10  
DMC707
Banned.
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Norman, Oklahoma
Posts: 5,024

Bikes: Too many to list

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1606 Post(s)
Liked 873 Times in 587 Posts
My IM , size 54, was almost 24 pounds with pedals- dont know how to get it down sub 20 without an exotic pair of wheels --- but some bikes just seem to work even if they are a bit porky
DMC707 is offline  
Old 10-26-21, 01:13 PM
  #11  
scarlson 
Senior Member
 
scarlson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Medford MA
Posts: 1,799

Bikes: Ron Cooper touring, 1959 Jack Taylor 650b ladyback touring tandem, Vitus 979, Joe Bell painted Claud Butler Dalesman, Colin Laing curved tube tandem, heavily-Dilberted 1982 Trek 6xx, René Herse tandem

Mentioned: 66 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 826 Post(s)
Liked 1,092 Times in 587 Posts
What's your freewheel/cassette situation? DT Swiss wheelset suggests a cassette, but maybe they made threaded hubs? If you've got a cassette with individual cogs not on an aluminum "spider" type carrier, you could reduce weight by getting a cassette with the bigger cogs on such a carrier. If it's a freewheel, then modern ones are usually lighter than older ones, although they may be underbuilt and not last as long. Or you can foray into aluminum-cogged exotica, but that's $$$.

An American Classic seatpost may be lighter still than your Specialized. And for a stem, you can try to find a Cinelli with the aluminum hardware. There are a few options if you go this route, but the weight may be offset if you then have to carry around a 7mm allen wrench in your toolkit!

Ti BB is an excellent idea. Hollow pin chain may shave off a few grams, and they can be had quite cheaply in the form of Chinese knockoffs. For extralight sidepull brakes, how about a Dia Compe/Suntour alpha 5000? I have found these to be extremely light. I think you can get aluminum recessed nuts to cut the weight of these down even more!

Here's a useful list of C&V component weights, if you haven't seen it already. It may help inform your decisions.
__________________
Owner & co-founder, Cycles René Hubris. Unfortunately attaching questionable braze-ons to perfectly good frames since about 2015. With style.
scarlson is offline  
Likes For scarlson:
Old 10-26-21, 01:46 PM
  #12  
Chombi1 
Senior Member
 
Chombi1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 3,861
Mentioned: 98 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1370 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 471 Times in 323 Posts
Try out a tubular wheelset and you can easily lose over a pound from the bike.....
__________________
72 Line Seeker
83 Davidson Signature
84 Peugeot PSV
84 Peugeot PY10FC
84 Gitane Tour de France.
85 Vitus Plus Carbone 7
86 ALAN Record Carbonio
86 Medici Aerodynamic (Project)
88 Pinarello Montello
89 Bottecchia Professional Chorus SL
95 Trek 5500 OCLV (Project)
Chombi1 is offline  
Likes For Chombi1:
Old 10-26-21, 02:12 PM
  #13  
scarlson 
Senior Member
 
scarlson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Medford MA
Posts: 1,799

Bikes: Ron Cooper touring, 1959 Jack Taylor 650b ladyback touring tandem, Vitus 979, Joe Bell painted Claud Butler Dalesman, Colin Laing curved tube tandem, heavily-Dilberted 1982 Trek 6xx, René Herse tandem

Mentioned: 66 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 826 Post(s)
Liked 1,092 Times in 587 Posts
Originally Posted by Chombi1 View Post
Try out a tubular wheelset and you can easily lose over a pound from the bike.....
Back in the day, for sure. When wire beads were your only option for clinchers, it would have been a pound.

However, you will have to carry around an extra tire, instead of just the tube, if you want to be able to fix flats in the field. And that weighs something.

And with kevlar beaded tires and modern clincher rims, the advantage isn't so much as it used to be. Fiamme ergals at 280g are about as light as tub rims get, while the lightest weight clincher rim I know of (Kinlin XR200) is only 380g - 100g more, each. A pretty light clincher tire (Vittoria Open Corsa, 220g) and tube (Schwalbe Extralight, 65g) weigh similar to a pretty light tubular (Vittoria Corsa, 280g). So the advantage of tubs so far is 200g.

But here's the kicker: a spare tubular is also 280g. A spare Schwalbe extralight tube will weigh 65g. So the tub toolkit is around 200g heavier. So comparing apples to apples (lightest rims, tires, tubes), if you include your toolkit you basically break even with a clincher.

Of course you can tweak this - take for example if you went with Clement Seta Extra tubulars, which are purported to be under 200g each. But then, I am sure I could find a 40g latex tube and a 150g clincher, and the equation is still the same: splitting hairs.

Back before kevlar beaded clinchers, of course, this wouldn't have been the case, tubs win hands down over wire beads.
__________________
Owner & co-founder, Cycles René Hubris. Unfortunately attaching questionable braze-ons to perfectly good frames since about 2015. With style.

Last edited by scarlson; 10-26-21 at 02:31 PM.
scarlson is offline  
Likes For scarlson:
Old 10-26-21, 02:23 PM
  #14  
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 21,057

Bikes: 1959 Capo Modell Campagnolo; 1960 Capo Sieger (2); 1962 Carlton Franco Suisse; 1970 Peugeot UO-8; 1982 Bianchi Campione d'Italia; 1988 Schwinn Project KOM-10;

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1182 Post(s)
Liked 741 Times in 518 Posts
Point taken for steady climbing, where total weight matters, but acceleration response will be better with the tubulars, because of moment of inertia and rotating weight.
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Carlton: 1962 Franco Suisse, S/N K7911
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline  
Old 10-26-21, 05:21 PM
  #15  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 14,498

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '88 Schwinn Premis , Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8171 Post(s)
Liked 5,048 Times in 2,933 Posts
Originally Posted by rjhammett View Post
I love it when weight weenies claim that they got their bike under xx pounds without pedals. I haven't tried riding a bike without pedals but I don't think it would work too well.
I love it when this gets brought up in 90% of weight threads.

Removing g pedals from the equation helps equalize things across bikes since so many people who care about weight would also want their own pedals. The Venn diagram would almost be one big circle.
Of course the argument could be made that saddle weight should also be excluded since so many who care about weight would also have their own saddle.

But this is to compare bikes with one another so if shop bikes are weighted without pedals, then home builds being weighed without pedals makes sense.


To be clear, I have never weighed a bike without pedals.
mstateglfr is offline  
Old 10-26-21, 05:45 PM
  #16  
icemilkcoffee 
Senior Member
 
icemilkcoffee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,263
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 745 Post(s)
Liked 577 Times in 354 Posts
Originally Posted by rjhammett View Post
I love it when weight weenies claim that they got their bike under xx pounds without pedals. I haven't tried riding a bike without pedals but I don't think it would work too well.
Speaking of pedals... I use Wellgo MG-8 SPD pedals with magnesium bodies. They are about 240g and have really crisp engagement. They are not as light as the lightest SPD pedals, which is the Ritchey Micro at 210g or so, but I've had Ritchey Road Logic pedals though and I am very unimpressed with Ritchey's mushy engagement. The ubiquitous standby Shimano A525 SPD pedals are relatively heavy a 330g.
Or if you are into toe clip pedals, The $25 Wellgo track pedals are the bestest deal on earth ever. 235g. Lightest quill pedals bar none. Puts MKS pedals to shame.
icemilkcoffee is offline  
Old 10-26-21, 05:47 PM
  #17  
squirtdad
Senior Member
 
squirtdad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: San Jose (Willow Glen) Ca
Posts: 8,502

Bikes: 85 team Miyata (modern 5800 105) , '84 Team Miyata,(dura ace old school) 80?? SR Semi-Pro 600 Arabesque

Mentioned: 89 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1739 Post(s)
Liked 1,365 Times in 828 Posts
city bike.... see if you can save a bit with a short wrap of handlebar tape instead of grips
__________________
Life is too short not to ride the best bike you have, as much as you can
(looking for Torpado Super light 56,57 or so)

squirtdad is offline  
Old 10-26-21, 06:48 PM
  #18  
tendency
Full Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 357
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 180 Post(s)
Liked 101 Times in 66 Posts
kinlin rims/extralight hubs/alloy nipples/berd spokes or super light double butted stainless depending on your budget and level of fanaticism.

titanium skewers.

latex tubes.

1x drive train with SRAM RED 1 1x crankset/BB.

Dura Ace 9/10/11/12 cluster. KMC superlight chain.

Personally, I don't care for carbon fiber on vintage bikes so I'd go w/ a Thompson Masterpiece seatpost.

Titanium quill stem.

Titanium egg beater pedals.

Last edited by tendency; 10-26-21 at 07:00 PM.
tendency is offline  
Old 10-26-21, 08:42 PM
  #19  
ThermionicScott 
working on my sandal tan
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 22,050

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers), All-City Space Horse (hers)

Mentioned: 95 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3628 Post(s)
Liked 2,058 Times in 1,306 Posts
Originally Posted by rjhammett View Post
I love it when weight weenies claim that they got their bike under xx pounds without pedals. I haven't tried riding a bike without pedals but I don't think it would work too well.
Do they? The few times I've lurked on weightweenies, it seemed like people generally discussed full rideable bikes. It's more impressive to build a sub 12-lb bike *with* pedals than without. Often it was Speedplays of some kind, but some folks went the extra mile with Aerolites or whatever.
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is offline  
Likes For ThermionicScott:
Old 10-27-21, 09:10 AM
  #20  
Chombi1 
Senior Member
 
Chombi1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 3,861
Mentioned: 98 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1370 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 471 Times in 323 Posts
Originally Posted by scarlson View Post
Back in the day, for sure. When wire beads were your only option for clinchers, it would have been a pound.

However, you will have to carry around an extra tire, instead of just the tube, if you want to be able to fix flats in the field. And that weighs something.

And with kevlar beaded tires and modern clincher rims, the advantage isn't so much as it used to be. Fiamme ergals at 280g are about as light as tub rims get, while the lightest weight clincher rim I know of (Kinlin XR200) is only 380g - 100g more, each. A pretty light clincher tire (Vittoria Open Corsa, 220g) and tube (Schwalbe Extralight, 65g) weigh similar to a pretty light tubular (Vittoria Corsa, 280g). So the advantage of tubs so far is 200g.

But here's the kicker: a spare tubular is also 280g. A spare Schwalbe extralight tube will weigh 65g. So the tub toolkit is around 200g heavier. So comparing apples to apples (lightest rims, tires, tubes), if you include your toolkit you basically break even with a clincher.

Of course you can tweak this - take for example if you went with Clement Seta Extra tubulars, which are purported to be under 200g each. But then, I am sure I could find a 40g latex tube and a 150g clincher, and the equation is still the same: splitting hairs.

Back before kevlar beaded clinchers, of course, this wouldn't have been the case, tubs win hands down over wire beads.
Tubs are still lighter than even the most modern foldable tires.
I have both tubs and foldable clincher wheelsets and zip never had been able to even match the weight of my tubupar whedlsets, even with my thinnest section and lightest climchers.
Plus the better ride that tubs have, compared to clinchers.
__________________
72 Line Seeker
83 Davidson Signature
84 Peugeot PSV
84 Peugeot PY10FC
84 Gitane Tour de France.
85 Vitus Plus Carbone 7
86 ALAN Record Carbonio
86 Medici Aerodynamic (Project)
88 Pinarello Montello
89 Bottecchia Professional Chorus SL
95 Trek 5500 OCLV (Project)
Chombi1 is offline  
Old 10-27-21, 09:16 AM
  #21  
scarlson 
Senior Member
 
scarlson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Medford MA
Posts: 1,799

Bikes: Ron Cooper touring, 1959 Jack Taylor 650b ladyback touring tandem, Vitus 979, Joe Bell painted Claud Butler Dalesman, Colin Laing curved tube tandem, heavily-Dilberted 1982 Trek 6xx, René Herse tandem

Mentioned: 66 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 826 Post(s)
Liked 1,092 Times in 587 Posts
Originally Posted by Chombi1 View Post
Tubs are still lighter than even the most modern foldable tires.
I have both tubs and foldable clincher wheelsets and zip never had been able to even match the weight of my tubupar whedlsets
Show me the numbers! We want numbers!

Also, I didn't say clinchers are lighter, I said tubulars are lighter comparing apples to apples, but it's offset by your heavier toolkit.

They do ride great.
__________________
Owner & co-founder, Cycles René Hubris. Unfortunately attaching questionable braze-ons to perfectly good frames since about 2015. With style.
scarlson is offline  
Old 10-27-21, 09:56 AM
  #22  
seypat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 7,191
Mentioned: 66 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2431 Post(s)
Liked 1,494 Times in 968 Posts
Back to the original post. Is this a bike that will have all of these mods for the purpose of selling to another owner? If so, you might be better off keeping it as is and letting the next owner do the mods he/she wants. Or not.
seypat is offline  
Old 10-27-21, 10:43 AM
  #23  
Chombi1 
Senior Member
 
Chombi1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 3,861
Mentioned: 98 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1370 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 471 Times in 323 Posts


Here's my own weight weenie "experiment".
My Vitus Plus Carbone 7 at just 16.73 pounds. And this is with one of my heavier tubular wheelsets (Rovals) on it.
​​​​it.
I can still get the weight lower if I change out the BB to Ti. And change out the Mavic crankset to maybe a Stronglight 106.
Chombi1 is offline  
Old 10-27-21, 01:02 PM
  #24  
Classtime 
Senior Member
 
Classtime's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 3,398

Bikes: 82 Medici, 2011 Richard Sachs, 2011 Milwaukee Road

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1320 Post(s)
Liked 806 Times in 506 Posts
If you insist on counting a tool/repair kit, you need to put more than one tube in the clincher kit because clinchers flat more often.
__________________
I don't do: disks, tubeless, e-shifting, or bead head nymphs.
Classtime is offline  
Old 10-27-21, 01:29 PM
  #25  
davester
Senior Member
 
davester's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Berkeley CA
Posts: 2,286

Bikes: 1981 Ron Cooper, 1974 Cinelli Speciale Corsa, 2000 Gary Fisher Sugar 1, 1986 Miyata 710, 1982 Raleigh "International"

Mentioned: 86 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 790 Post(s)
Liked 794 Times in 337 Posts
Originally Posted by Classtime View Post
If you insist on counting a tool/repair kit, you need to put more than one tube in the clincher kit because clinchers flat more often.
Not necessarily. If we're talking real weight weenie you shouldn't be carrying around extra tubes at all. Get rid of the one tube and use a patch kit instead. Win, win!

(of course the same could be said for tubulars...carry a patch kit that includes needle, thread, razor blade, casing glue).
davester is offline  
Likes For davester:

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.