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BF Goodrich Schwinn Ladies bike

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BF Goodrich Schwinn Ladies bike

Old 10-31-21, 08:40 AM
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PBYO988
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BF Goodrich Schwinn Ladies bike

I just picked up one of these for $50 and itís in pretty good shape. I have to replace the saddle, handlebar grips and the front fender light.
Before I start to strip it down to its core to clean and lube is there anything I need to be carful of or be aware of ?
Thanks for any suggestions.
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Old 10-31-21, 10:08 AM
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Not much other than make sure you use correct tools, I would use a wire brush on rusty bolts, and I would employ penetrant like Kroil or PB Blaster on all the threadings, seatpost and stem. That with help you take it all apart.

Others will chime in with more advice.

Great project!
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Old 10-31-21, 04:09 PM
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I hear you Mr 66, I’m already running into seized up bolts and nuts.
I’ve just twisted the head of my Stanley screwdriver trying to get the front fender detached from the forks.
I’m also setting up my curse-word go to list now so I don’t waste time later.
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Old 10-31-21, 06:10 PM
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Originally Posted by PBYO988 View Post
I hear you Mr 66, Iím already running into seized up bolts and nuts.
Iíve just twisted the head of my Stanley screwdriver trying to get the front fender detached from the forks.
Iím also setting up my curse-word go to list now so I donít waste time later.
Definitely soak everything in penetrating oil before attempting to disassemble it. Your arms and tools will thank you.
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Old 10-31-21, 09:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Korina View Post
Definitely soak everything in penetrating oil before attempting to disassemble it. Your arms and tools will thank you.
Thanks for the advice Korina, Iím going to soak it for a couple of days then use the hairdryer before I attempt it again.
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Old 10-31-21, 09:41 PM
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Donít spoil it, Kroil it.
Kroil, but he oil that creeps
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Old 10-31-21, 10:26 PM
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Cool looking green bike!

Here is an inexpensive source for the nearest sized NEW reflector that is a replacement for the original.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/333766374933

The integral stud has the diameter that fits, but the overall length of the integral stud is slightly too long in my opinion.
You should plan on cutting off approx 4mm to 5mm. You could maybe get by with it as it is but you'll have excess stud-shaft threads extending beyond the nut, which will encroach closer to the tire. (it will look crappy with the excess going so far beyond the fender & too close to the tire in my opinion....that is why I recommend cutting off the excess.) Now this is Important if you want to easily cut-off the excess with a hacksaw. YOU WILL NEED A STIFF ENOUGH WOODEN PAINT STIRRER STICK, or possibly a other piece of scrap wood, metal , etc......WHAT YOU WILL DO is drill a hole in the paint stirrer stick (or whatever item..) so that you can securely bolt the reflector on to. You need to do this in order to mount the paint stirrer stick(or whatever item) in your VISE so you can saw the excess off of the integral stud of this KM-106 red reflector. You can't clamp the reflector in the VISE because it will destroy it, or at least severely scar it up badly. Remember to TEST FIT THE REFLECTOR TO DETERMINE EXACTLY THE NEEDED AMOUNT before you cut it too short without checking the actual length that you will actually need.

There are folks on the C.A.B.E. that absolutely love the boys version (men's bike) of your old Schwinn. Most there have historically only used the girls bike (step-through Women's model) to cannibalize the parts and to throw away the frame, except for the front fork which they would cut down for cannibalizing for boys bike frame build-up. This attitude is slowly changing somewhat, however slowly with perhaps 5% to 10% of folks there now, not simply trashing the nice girls bike after scavenging all the parts. The major reason they throw-away the girls frame is that most are men, old set in their ways, doofuses who believe that men & boys should never be seen riding a girls bike. This is why there is NONE or very little resale for the nice antique girls model compared to the same model boys version. 85% of the superb antique bikes that collectors over on the C.A.B.E. are so nice because parts came from girls bikes of the same model. Girls throughout the ages, generally took much better care of their bicycles than boys did. The attitude is slowly changing as some of these old fossils find that now at their advanced age cannot easily mount a boys bike and because their wives see that fact, they encourage the old codgers to switch to a step-through frame, even though the old fossil does initially resist but does after being ridiculed for nearly getting seriously hurt falling while failing to mount over the top bar of the boys bike. Only then do they see the light and then see the value of step-through bikes. Do not get discouraged if some of the C.A.B.E. fellows tell ya to find a boys frame and build it that way, just remember that is simply how some of those old farts think. The same idiots think that bicycle helmets are for silly fray-dee cats, as they take the dimwit view that there were no helmets way back when, so ain't gonna even consider wearing one. Other than perhaps some of these caveman C.A.B.E.man views, the folks over on the C.A.B.E. are at least as enthusiastic about ancient bikes as the folks here on bikeforums are. You'll find there is far less NEGATIVITY over there on the C.A.B.E. than here on bikeforums.
C.A.B.E. = classic antique bicycle exchange
https://thecabe.com/forum/

The folks on the C.A.B.E. will likely have or know where to obtain any particular items for your bike. They also have many who have perfected ways of cleaning, disassembling, reassembling, improving, modifying, restoring,,etc.
If you aren't already familiar with the C.A.B.E. , you should check it out, and be sure to both post here on bikeforums and also over there too. Everybody always likes to see and hear about neat old bikes that someone is having fun with. It is all about fun. Sometimes a few people here on bikeforums forget that you don't need an expensive, exclusive high-end bicycle to really have fun riding a bike. You can do that with anything with two wheels & functioning brakes of course, pedals and decent condition tires/tubes that hold air.
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Old 11-13-21, 11:47 AM
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I’ve just ran into my first major problem. There is a bolt that attaches the front fender to the forks. It goes up and is screwed direct into the bottom to the fork stem.
The bolt head sheared off so I drilled it and hammered in a spiral flute to extract it. The spiral flute sheared off right inside the bore hole and now it’s stuck in there.
Ive tried to drill it hoping it’s left hand thread would get gripped by the drill bit but to no avail it’s well and truly stuck. And because the flute it made of some super strong material the drill is hardly making a mark on it.
Any ideas would be appreciated.

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Old 11-13-21, 11:59 AM
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Originally Posted by PBYO988 View Post
Iíve just ran into my first major problem. There is a bolt that attaches the front fender to the forks. It goes up and is screwed direct into the bottom to the fork stem.
The bolt head sheared off so I drilled it and hammered in a spiral flute to extract it. The spiral flute sheared off right inside the bore hole and now itís stuck in there.
Ive tried to drill it hoping itís left hand thread would get gripped by the drill bit but to no avail itís well and truly stuck. And because the flute it made of some super strong material the drill is hardly making a mark on it.
Any ideas would be appreciated.
Carbide burr on die grinder may get you there. At this rate you are going to run out of patience before you get there but it and penetrant will be crucial from here on out.

Here's the pencil grinder from Harbor Freight that has save my azz so many times, $25-28.

The burrs need to be good quality to get after the broken EZ out so I would source some good ones from a machine shop supply.


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Old 11-13-21, 02:47 PM
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Originally Posted by merziac View Post
Carbide burr on die grinder may get you there. At this rate you are going to run out of patience before you get there but it and penetrant will be crucial from here on out.

Here's the pencil grinder from Harbor Freight that has save my azz so many times, $25-28.

The burrs need to be good quality to get after the broken EZ out so I would source some good ones from a machine shop supply.


Thanks for the advice. I have a carbide burr on order and hopefully Iíll get it tomorrow. I hope it can shift the broken extractor.
The only real problems Iíve had stripping it is around the fenders, it must be all that rain and dirt that deteriorates the retaining nuts and bolts. I just got the crank out with no bother at all (love caged bearings) and the bearing racers are in surprisingly Good shape. I have to say that this is an extremely well made frame.
One thing I did notice is the chainring seems to have a copper colour showing through where the chrome has worn.
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Old 11-13-21, 02:53 PM
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Originally Posted by PBYO988 View Post
Thanks for the advice. I have a carbide burr on order and hopefully Iíll get it tomorrow. I hope it can shift the broken extractor.
The only real problems Iíve had stripping it is around the fenders, it must be all that rain and dirt that deteriorates the retaining nuts and bolts. I just got the crank out with no bother at all (love caged bearings) and the bearing racers are in surprisingly Good shape. I have to say that this is an extremely well made frame.
One thing I did notice is the chainring seems to have a copper colour showing through where the chrome has worn.
Anytime, and keep in mind that with a PITA task like this, it can be all about the tool.

This pencil grinder maneuvers and gets in places to do a far better job than bulky full sized ones while still having plenty of speed and power.

Again patience is key, soak and wait then proceed with extreme caution.
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Old 11-13-21, 04:25 PM
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Thanks for all of this helpful information.
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Old 11-13-21, 04:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Vintage Schwinn View Post
Cool looking green bike!

Here is an inexpensive source for the nearest sized NEW reflector that is a replacement for the original.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/333766374933

The integral stud has the diameter that fits, but the overall length of the integral stud is slightly too long in my opinion.
You should plan on cutting off approx 4mm to 5mm. You could maybe get by with it as it is but you'll have excess stud-shaft threads extending beyond the nut, which will encroach closer to the tire. (it will look crappy with the excess going so far beyond the fender & too close to the tire in my opinion....that is why I recommend cutting off the excess.) Now this is Important if you want to easily cut-off the excess with a hacksaw. YOU WILL NEED A STIFF ENOUGH WOODEN PAINT STIRRER STICK, or possibly a other piece of scrap wood, metal , etc......WHAT YOU WILL DO is drill a hole in the paint stirrer stick (or whatever item..) so that you can securely bolt the reflector on to. You need to do this in order to mount the paint stirrer stick(or whatever item) in your VISE so you can saw the excess off of the integral stud of this KM-106 red reflector. You can't clamp the reflector in the VISE because it will destroy it, or at least severely scar it up badly. Remember to TEST FIT THE REFLECTOR TO DETERMINE EXACTLY THE NEEDED AMOUNT before you cut it too short without checking the actual length that you will actually need.

There are folks on the C.A.B.E. that absolutely love the boys version (men's bike) of your old Schwinn. Most there have historically only used the girls bike (step-through Women's model) to cannibalize the parts and to throw away the frame, except for the front fork which they would cut down for cannibalizing for boys bike frame build-up. This attitude is slowly changing somewhat, however slowly with perhaps 5% to 10% of folks there now, not simply trashing the nice girls bike after scavenging all the parts. The major reason they throw-away the girls frame is that most are men, old set in their ways, doofuses who believe that men & boys should never be seen riding a girls bike. This is why there is NONE or very little resale for the nice antique girls model compared to the same model boys version. 85% of the superb antique bikes that collectors over on the C.A.B.E. are so nice because parts came from girls bikes of the same model. Girls throughout the ages, generally took much better care of their bicycles than boys did. The attitude is slowly changing as some of these old fossils find that now at their advanced age cannot easily mount a boys bike and because their wives see that fact, they encourage the old codgers to switch to a step-through frame, even though the old fossil does initially resist but does after being ridiculed for nearly getting seriously hurt falling while failing to mount over the top bar of the boys bike. Only then do they see the light and then see the value of step-through bikes. Do not get discouraged if some of the C.A.B.E. fellows tell ya to find a boys frame and build it that way, just remember that is simply how some of those old farts think. The same idiots think that bicycle helmets are for silly fray-dee cats, as they take the dimwit view that there were no helmets way back when, so ain't gonna even consider wearing one. Other than perhaps some of these caveman C.A.B.E.man views, the folks over on the C.A.B.E. are at least as enthusiastic about ancient bikes as the folks here on bikeforums are. You'll find there is far less NEGATIVITY over there on the C.A.B.E. than here on bikeforums.
C.A.B.E. = classic antique bicycle exchange
https://thecabe.com/forum/

The folks on the C.A.B.E. will likely have or know where to obtain any particular items for your bike. They also have many who have perfected ways of cleaning, disassembling, reassembling, improving, modifying, restoring,,etc.
If you aren't already familiar with the C.A.B.E. , you should check it out, and be sure to both post here on bikeforums and also over there too. Everybody always likes to see and hear about neat old bikes that someone is having fun with. It is all about fun. Sometimes a few people here on bikeforums forget that you don't need an expensive, exclusive high-end bicycle to really have fun riding a bike. You can do that with anything with two wheels & functioning brakes of course, pedals and decent condition tires/tubes that hold air.
thank you.
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Old 11-13-21, 04:33 PM
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Broken taps/extractos due to their hardness can often be broken up with a punch and the pieces picked out.
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Old 11-13-21, 05:06 PM
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Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
Broken taps/extractos due to their hardness can often be broken up with a punch and the pieces picked out.
I can see how that could work. Thx.
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Old 11-13-21, 05:08 PM
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Is there a way around this discolouration, I canít for the life of me work out why itís bronze looking under the chrome.

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Old 11-13-21, 05:49 PM
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Originally Posted by PBYO988 View Post
Is there a way around this discolouration, I canít for the life of me work out why itís bronze looking under the chrome.
Copper plating is often a plating layer under chrome.

​​​​​​https://pchrome.com/faq/ultimate-guide-chrome-plating/
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Old 11-13-21, 11:29 PM
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Here is a suggestion. Here in the Deep South, there are so many machine shops because racing is a super popular weekend hobby for a lot of people. Machine shops typically build / rebuild, etc for the dirt track weekend hobby racers, and for local company fleets (beer distributors, plumbing contractors,heavy construction equipment, arbor/tree cutting firms) and to a lesser extent Drag Boat competitors & NHRA Drag racers & SCCA competitors. A lot of farmers are the bread & butter of the Machine Shops as the farmers have to get much more out of their equipment as capital equipment costs for a successful farm is well into seven figures.
Go by your local NAPA auto parts store, and ask the guys there to recommend a Machine Shop......(TELL THEM (guys at NAPA etc...) THAT YOU HAVE AN ANCIENT BICYCLE FORK THAT YOU NEED.....
The reason to ask for a recommendation is when you do go to the Machine Shop.......you mention that Richard Frost at NAPA, said to come see you.......
Here in my area, there are at least five machine shops that I know of that would drill out/extract that broken-off fender mount screw for no more than $15 because it would take less than two minutes to do, and if you know anything about Machine Shops in the South, they are filled with super-creative people that just like to build, fix, disassemble things but they all love to construct & build things........A bicycle part is a fun distraction and it could be a learning experience for the 16 year old part time kid that just currently degreases parts and sweeps up and takes out the trash. Some shops might do it for nothing if you're a friend of their friend Richard Frost.. Heck, doing something simple like that, for free, will gather them five years of great word of mouth advertising/goodwill because you'll surely tell everyone that hey, Bubba Starnes at Starnes Machine Shop did the screw extraction for my ancient BF Goodrich SCHWINN for no charge........he said just come back and see us again and recommend us when yall might need some real work done....
Something like going where they have the equipment & facilities and tools to do the extraction in a minute, might be smarter than buying a collection of possible drill bits and extractors that might/or might not make it easy for you to do it yourself. Yeah, you'll learn by doing it but you'll also be spending money on tools that you will seldom ever use. If you've got the time, I'd investigate and ask a few machine shops.........if they tell you they would charge you more than $20, just politely say, NO THANK YOU and walk out, and maybe try another. This is why the recommendation from the guys at your local NAPA might help. NAPA tends to have older and more experienced people working there and they do far less ordinary walk-in retail traffic than Advance/Auto Zone/O'Reillys because the stores are smaller and focused in the products that they carry.
Independent muffler shops that are out in the sticks, or in gritty industrial areas near the airport, etc are often good sources if you ever need minor welding work done, or if you need to heat something cherry red to bend some steel part.....etc ...whatever. These places are not your clean cookie cutter Midas / Meineke stores but for example Joe Bob's Auto & Truck Muffler & Custom Exhaust. Typically, often you have Cooter combined with MacGyver there and these folks are used to thinking on the spot to make creative repairs because they do it all from farm equipment to semis, and keeping cars & pickups with unholy exhaust pipe & muffler at the most affordable prices, and custom exhaust for engine swapped vehicles, and straight piping in lieu of catalytic converter on ancient pre computer - pre efi cars...... if you tell them that the vehicle will be used for off road use, or farm use, or as a race car, they will do whatever you want, but it becomes your problem if you find yourself in a county or state where the vehicle's tailpipe emission will not register low enough to pass to renew the annual tag registration.
It never hurts to know and be connected with these Cooter-MacGyver type folks as too many discount their supreme skills in anything with metal bending, welding, metal fabrication, drilling, tapping, honing, and all kinds of metal fasteners, as well as a great degree of knowledge in automotive/truck/marine/industrial engines and related chassis suspensions and drive trains.
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Old 11-14-21, 12:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Vintage Schwinn View Post
Here is a suggestion. Here in the Deep South, there are so many machine shops because racing is a super popular weekend hobby for a lot of people. Machine shops typically build / rebuild, etc for the dirt track weekend hobby racers, and for local company fleets (beer distributors, plumbing contractors,heavy construction equipment, arbor/tree cutting firms) and to a lesser extent Drag Boat competitors & NHRA Drag racers & SCCA competitors. A lot of farmers are the bread & butter of the Machine Shops as the farmers have to get much more out of their equipment as capital equipment costs for a successful farm is well into seven figures.
Go by your local NAPA auto parts store, and ask the guys there to recommend a Machine Shop......(TELL THEM (guys at NAPA etc...) THAT YOU HAVE AN ANCIENT BICYCLE FORK THAT YOU NEED.....
The reason to ask for a recommendation is when you do go to the Machine Shop.......you mention that Richard Frost at NAPA, said to come see you.......
Here in my area, there are at least five machine shops that I know of that would drill out/extract that broken-off fender mount screw for no more than $15 because it would take less than two minutes to do, and if you know anything about Machine Shops in the South, they are filled with super-creative people that just like to build, fix, disassemble things but they all love to construct & build things........A bicycle part is a fun distraction and it could be a learning experience for the 16 year old part time kid that just currently degreases parts and sweeps up and takes out the trash. Some shops might do it for nothing if you're a friend of their friend Richard Frost.. Heck, doing something simple like that, for free, will gather them five years of great word of mouth advertising/goodwill because you'll surely tell everyone that hey, Bubba Starnes at Starnes Machine Shop did the screw extraction for my ancient BF Goodrich SCHWINN for no charge........he said just come back and see us again and recommend us when yall might need some real work done....
Something like going where they have the equipment & facilities and tools to do the extraction in a minute, might be smarter than buying a collection of possible drill bits and extractors that might/or might not make it easy for you to do it yourself. Yeah, you'll learn by doing it but you'll also be spending money on tools that you will seldom ever use. If you've got the time, I'd investigate and ask a few machine shops.........if they tell you they would charge you more than $20, just politely say, NO THANK YOU and walk out, and maybe try another. This is why the recommendation from the guys at your local NAPA might help. NAPA tends to have older and more experienced people working there and they do far less ordinary walk-in retail traffic than Advance/Auto Zone/O'Reillys because the stores are smaller and focused in the products that they carry.
Independent muffler shops that are out in the sticks, or in gritty industrial areas near the airport, etc are often good sources if you ever need minor welding work done, or if you need to heat something cherry red to bend some steel part.....etc ...whatever. These places are not your clean cookie cutter Midas / Meineke stores but for example Joe Bob's Auto & Truck Muffler & Custom Exhaust. Typically, often you have Cooter combined with MacGyver there and these folks are used to thinking on the spot to make creative repairs because they do it all from farm equipment to semis, and keeping cars & pickups with unholy exhaust pipe & muffler at the most affordable prices, and custom exhaust for engine swapped vehicles, and straight piping in lieu of catalytic converter on ancient pre computer - pre efi cars...... if you tell them that the vehicle will be used for off road use, or farm use, or as a race car, they will do whatever you want, but it becomes your problem if you find yourself in a county or state where the vehicle's tailpipe emission will not register low enough to pass to renew the annual tag registration.
It never hurts to know and be connected with these Cooter-MacGyver type folks as too many discount their supreme skills in anything with metal bending, welding, metal fabrication, drilling, tapping, honing, and all kinds of metal fasteners, as well as a great degree of knowledge in automotive/truck/marine/industrial engines and related chassis suspensions and drive trains.
Thatís a very good idea, I live next to Empire Boulevard in Brooklyn, there are paint shops, exhaust repair shops, mechanics and auto repairs shops. Getting to know them would be interesting as we all share an interest in metal, function and aesthetics.
I am a bit of a tool bloke so Iím slowly building up a collection of bike specific tools centred around restoration. Iím sure as I delve deeper Iíll run across problems that will require a tool that is way too specific and costly for me to do it myself. Having some connections with the local specialists could help and I like chatting about, and swapping ideas on different approaches.
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Old 11-14-21, 12:55 AM
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Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
Copper plating is often a plating layer under chrome.

​​​​​​https://pchrome.com/faq/ultimate-guide-chrome-plating/
This was a great link and very insightful.
Iím going to clean up the crank as best I can and be happy with that.
On reflection the wear on the chainring is a character plus as it shows the many years of clothing brushing up against it as people rode the bike. The chrome loss looks industrious and gentle so Iíll keep it.
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Old 11-14-21, 12:14 PM
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The Carbide burr did the trick, I’m a believer so no more EZ out.
I also had to get a tap and die set, I tapped the new hole for an M6 bolt and it looks good.
In addition the light on the front fender was completely stuck as the bolts had rusted and seized.
WD40 and a Carbide burr made short work of removing them with no damage to the fender.
I’m not sure what to do with the fender light, It’s had a rough 70 years. If I clean then I have to paint it and it won’t blend into the patina
of the bike but if I leave it it looks rubbish.




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Old 11-25-21, 10:28 AM
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I just cleaned one pedal and it looks great.

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Old 11-26-21, 10:08 AM
  #23  
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I have another question that perhaps can help me gain insight as to what direction I can take?

The rust on both rims are bad but the rims are saveable. My dilemma is do I try and keep the patina and find some way to clean around the rust. Or do I just strip and repaint which would mean a total repaint for the whole bike?




Thx in advance?
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Old 11-26-21, 12:00 PM
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https://wb8nbs.wordpress.com/2019/09...-electrolysis/

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Old 11-26-21, 12:12 PM
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Great vid,
So it looks like Evapo-Rust is the go-to gear to keep the paint and break the rust down.
Thx for helping.
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