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-   -   What 'new' tech are you willing to use on your C&V bike? (https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vintage/1242472-what-new-tech-you-willing-use-your-c-v-bike.html)

jamesdak 11-18-21 08:49 PM

I can't say I have a limit. But I highly doubt I'll go electronic, disc brakes or tubeless.

But I've taken 80's bikes to 11 speed with modern wheels no issues and kept other pure stock and pretty much everything in between.

https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...7817db5f89.jpg
85 kicked up to 8 speed STI and carbon tubular rims. A mild upgrade.

https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...20bbc7d276.jpg
87 with full Campagnolo 11 speed and Zonda rims

https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...8a7b917494.jpg
85 ummm.....downgraded with 81 tubular rims.

Chombi1 11-18-21 09:45 PM

Uhmmmm..... Tires...... Modern tubs like Vittoria Graphene G's

genejockey 11-18-21 09:46 PM

Modern tires in 25mm, Kool Stop brake pads, Jagwire cables, modern saddles, modern bar tape.

Plus I run a tail light and a Garmin Varia, so I also use a Garmin head unit.

But since you said "Post 1975", and none of my bikes is older than 1982, and the oldest groupset dates to 1978, I guess ALL of it is "new tech".

obrentharris 11-18-21 09:49 PM

I'm so modern I even use chamois cream out of a plastic squeeze tube instead of a tub!
Brent

John E 11-18-21 09:55 PM


Originally Posted by steelbikeguy (Post 22312743)
I really haven't followed the technology much. The most modern bits on my vintage-ish bikes would be the 8 speed indexed stuff on my Borthwick and the SPD pedals. The LED lights too, although that's just about universal nowadays.

Like most folks, I run kevlar beaded clinchers on most of my C&V bikes. These are well known to cause very tight fits on some vintage rims. As such, I like to carry an EZ Clincher tire jack to help get the tire mounted after fixing a flat. This tool hasn't been on the market for much more than a year, to my knowledge, so I'd say that it qualifies as "new tech". It works quite well and is small and light. Highly recommended!


https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...6bd27c8c80.jpg

Steve in Peoria

Thank you for posting. I won't ride anymore without a KoolStop tire jack, given how tightly some of today's tires, clincher and ATB, fit onto rims.

John E 11-18-21 10:00 PM

Lights! LEDs day and night, front and rear, preferably USB-chargeable.

Brake pads! KoolStop salmons or bust.

Modern low-compression, low-friction cable housings.

I do have an 8-speed cassette on the mountain bike; original equipment would have been a 6-speed freewheel.

DMC707 11-18-21 10:37 PM

I like it all ---

I would love to retrofit an old frame with discs and be Di2 ready (with hidden cables and batteries etc. --

davester 11-18-21 10:55 PM

I'm with John E . LED lighting is my main concession to modern, followed by Teflon-lined cable housings combined with Teflon-coated cables Using these cables makes me realize that all the hype about dual pivot brakes is really about the cables, not the location of the pivots. My single-pivots are vastly improved by going with modern cables. In addition to those major improvements, I must say that using ramped freewheel cogs does lead to slightly smoother shifting than the old versions, though this is a pretty minor advantage.

sincos 11-19-21 12:33 AM

I don't value C/V qua C/V. I do value lasting quality, though, and I appreciate well-made, nondisposable objects that continue to function beautifully for decades. I also appreciate things that are easy to work on and maintain. As for C/V bikes, there are also things less quantifiable, like the ride and the esthetic. Also, it helps if pieces aren't eye-gougingly ugly (modern 4-arm cranks, modern RDs, those STI things with the cables coming out the sides...) As for what I'd put on a C/V, I'm happy with good examples of the tech available at the time, the only thing I feel strongly about are pedals, having switched over to clipless with the 2nd generation Looks (the 1st were a bit hefty).

That said, I like modern as well, and like droppedandlost upthread (nice bikes, btw!), I have modern Italian and vintage French.

https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...9a7de469ed.jpg
(Wheels are ugly but excellent -- will take the stickers off when I can be arsed. Tubeless has definitely won me over)

https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...0f99e7a509.jpg
(Now has DT shifters, getting clipless pedals, and maybe if the parts supply ever improves, 700c tubeless)

The shifting on the modern is much quicker and more convenient, it has a wider and more closely spaced gearing range, and the braking is immeasurably better but the vintage stuff works just fine, thanks.

cyccommute 11-19-21 09:29 AM


Originally Posted by merziac (Post 22312353)
Especially the threadless part, just one of the disposable, cartridge, throwaway, cookie cutter, profit at all costs crap that insures nobody will be able to work on C+V in a shop setting, we're almost there now. :troll:

People complain about “throwaway modern parts” without remembering how many old parts had (and have) to be thrown away because they are worn out or damaged at a much higher rate than modern parts.

Threadless headsets solved a very real problem in mountain biking that resulted in far less “disposal” of parts. Threaded headsets don’t stay tight when subjected to off-road pounding and had to be replaced frequently after even a single ride. Being more durable and more secure, threadless headsets resulted in far less disposal than threaded. The headset…and associated steer tube…resulted in a far stiffer front end which greatly improves handling as well. No more noodly goose necks that flexed when riding out of the saddle. The fact that they are also far easier to work on is just gravy.

Cartridge bearings have also resulted in far less “throwaway” parts. A cartridge bearing bottom bracket will out last 10 loose bearing sets. I see a lot of pitted loose bearing spindles at my local co-op but seldom do I see a cartridge bearing bottom bracket that is actually broken.

A cartridge bearing hub can go for 10s of thousands of miles without overhaul and without replacing pitted cones. Again, I see lots and lots and lots of pitted cones. I see very few seized cartridge bearing hubs.

randyjawa 11-19-21 09:54 AM

I do my best to street restore using period correct components only, however; I use SPD pedals on all of my bikes, regardless of vintage or model...
https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...dfa64e527f.jpg
https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...766cf2087c.jpg

I use Brifters only on bikes that were supplied with Brifters as original component issue...
https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...e1e8f69443.jpg

squirtdad 11-19-21 10:59 AM


Originally Posted by DMC707 (Post 22312958)
I like it all ---

I would love to retrofit an old frame with discs and be Di2 ready (with hidden cables and batteries etc. --

or get a custom steel set up this way and designed for disc...... :)

ThermionicScott 11-19-21 11:09 AM

My first road bike was a 1991 model, so cassette hubs, aero brake levers, and indexed DT shifters are my "baseline."

Dyno lighting has improved so much since 1975, especially over the last 10 years or so, there are hardly any downsides to having it on your ride. And the hubs and lights are available with fairly "classic" looks, so they don't have to clash on a vintage bike. Only laziness keeps me from installing a full set of modern dyno lights on every bike...

The only other modern tech I install are the bike computers, but my needs there are so simple (speed and odometer) that I just get the most basic models in current production. I'm a nerd, so I've gotta have something to do that job. ;)
- - - - - -

I must say, though, that my new BikeSmith cotter press has made cottered cranks much less intimidating. Every so often, I think it would be cool to have a road bike with all the older tech on it, like tubulars, cottered cranks, lever front derailleur, etc. Something "heroic."

jforb427 11-19-21 12:11 PM

I'm lucky, I missed out on decades of advances by not riding modern bikes....so when I recently found an old one that was a bit better than anything I had long ago, I'm content to keep it as original as I can.

And since I ride for exercise, it doesn't matter that it's not as efficient as it could be.

steine13 11-19-21 12:12 PM

My Forever bike is a 1996 Cannondale T400, ordered from the LBS. That was state of the art for low-end bikes with a 7sp cassette and Shimano indexed DT shifters. So in my case it's more arrested development than originality or purity.. the T now wears 8 speed bar-end shifters, and being aluminum, there's not much 'mystique' to be had in any case. Aluminum frame + good quality 38 mm tires = wonderful ride. Aluminum is no harsher than steel in the way it passes on road shock -- both materials do so 1:1 -- but it vibrates differently and feels "buzzy." It's not really an issue with soft-enough tires.

Oh, and I like aero brake levers, but I missed my Mirrycle so much I drilled and tapped the brake levers to take that mirror. It's a little fragile but I've had it for years and it still works.

I have two steel bikes, one an 87 Moser bought new with Campy Triomphe and sew-ups... those 23 mm were remarkably comfortable to ride, not a lot of "cushion" but you could use all of it, that's how they felt.. but way too much trouble and too expensive in the long run. I modernized that bike with 9sp Ultegra STI levers and 20/24 spoke wheels from the mid-2000s. It works well but I never warmed to the shifters; too noodly when braking, and too awkward when shifting, because they are made for large hands.

Functionally I've replaced that bike with a 97 Cannondale R200, and that wears Microshift 9sp bar-ends and the Bontrager wheels from the Moser. It's a decent look and other than the 28 mm tires it's a great ride and works a treat. I plan on moving on to something that can take my favorite road tires: 32 mm GP5000. I'll invest the extra 400 g of frame weight to go Cannondale ST series and run either 9 sp or "8 of 9" on a narrow hub. I reluctantly went back to SPD pedals for longer distances. They do work.

There is no advantage for my riding to go more than 9 speeds, and I like the simplicity. I have no interest in disc brakes, but if something comes along I may give it a shot. Hydraulic, probably not. Electronic shifting, definitely not, dto. carbon fiber or aluminum forks. Steel forks for me, thank you. The older I get the more I value my skin.

And YES to modern LED/dyno lighting, especially for commuting.
Well, I'm glad I got all that off my chest.

cheers -mathias

Roger M 11-19-21 12:21 PM

Back in the day this worked well(still drink one on occasion. Ex: Cino 2013)

https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...08eed216d2.jpg
https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...a38cd5834b.jpg
This modern version seems to work
better...

Dave Mayer 11-19-21 12:56 PM

Most of my bikes are pre-1990, so predate things like brifters, clipless etc. But here is what I use on any C&V bike I actually ride:
-
  • Brifters. Safer and more convenient. Campagnolo Ergopower is my favorite. The 8-speed Ultrashift levers are as crisp and precise as the 11-speed stuff,
  • Clipless pedals. Easier in and out; you only have to break your leg once while trapped in toeclips to change your mindset on this,
  • Dual pivot brakes. Much better stopping power and they stay centered,
  • Modern cables and housing. Remember the old unlined steel shifter housing from back in the day? No thanks, and
  • Cassette hubs. I do ride on some 7-speed freewheel hubs, but frankly, the cassette technology is better in terms of gearing choice and strength of the axle.
'Old' tech that is better:
-
  • Rim brakes. Maybe need discs for MTB or for loaded touring in the rain, but on a road bike? Discs are heavy, fussy, expensive and unnecessary, and
  • Tubulars. Tubular tires are no better than clinchers, but the tubular rim profile is superior than the clincher rim in every respect. Lighter, stronger, conducts heat better, and doesn't cause pinch flats. Oh, and a massive safety difference during a sudden blowout.

C9H13N 11-19-21 01:40 PM

Cartridge bottom brackets are a must. I canít be bothered with cups and balls. My Davidson came with a Phil but the rest of my builds have inexpensive ones, UN55 and Tange/IRD.

tiger1964 11-19-21 01:47 PM

"Sealed bearing" headsets and bottom brackets do not ruin the C&V aesthetic, and I am having good luck with Velo Orange's units. SPD pedals do affect "the Look" but I am adapting to them. Modern cables & housing... who can tell, just by looking at a bike?

Modern "cockpits", including the bars, stems and "brifters", look too much like bike parts painted by Picasso for my tastes, so no-go. Organic-blob RD's and cranksets, for the same reason. YMMV, YMMV, YMMV.

Flatforkcrown 11-19-21 01:49 PM

I have shifters and pedals that click on 2 of my 3 bikesÖ Sachs ergos shifting over a 7 speed freewheel and speedplay on the de Rosa, and 9speed sti (ultegra/xt/xtr) and xt sod on the volpe. They just make riding more enjoyable, and donít feel out of place. My 72 Moto is all period correct, except alloy campy toe clips.
https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...9d4bb55dd.jpeg
https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...ed493787d.jpeg

squirtdad 11-19-21 02:30 PM


Originally Posted by Roger M (Post 22313471)
Back in the day this worked well(still drink one on occasion. Ex: Cino 2013)

https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...08eed216d2.jpg
https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...a38cd5834b.jpg
This modern version seems to work
better...

Don't forget Olympia :)

degan 11-19-21 02:50 PM

I have no problem with any level of tech on any sort of C&V bike, the part just has to have the right milieu. For example, a wheel with a cassette hub on a C&V bike can work because we all know there are cassette hubs out there that look the part that can be laced to modern double-walled AL rims that also look the part. What doesn't work IMO is when you put some sort of crazy carbon wheel with 8 bladed spokes on a C&V bike. Even though the two wheels accept the same cassette one sticks out like a sore thumb. The C&V option might weigh a little more, but if that is a concern to you and you have the dough then its a fools errand to start with a C&V bike anyway. The same goes with threadless headsets, brifters, drivetrains, carbon, and pretty much every bike tech advancement.

merziac 11-19-21 02:55 PM


Originally Posted by degan (Post 22313645)
I have no problem with any level of tech on any sort of C&V bike, the part just has to have the right milieu. For example, a wheel with a cassette hub on a C&V bike can work because we all know there are cassette hubs out there that look the part that can be laced to modern double-walled AL rims that also look the part. What doesn't work IMO is when you put some sort of crazy carbon wheel with 8 bladed spokes on a C&V bike. Even though the two wheels accept the same cassette one sticks out like a sore thumb. The C&V option might weigh a little more, but if that is a concern to you and you have the dough then its a fools errand to start with a C&V bike anyway. The same goes with threadless headsets, brifters, drivetrains, carbon, and pretty much every bike tech advancement.

:thumb: Well said.

Chuck M 11-19-21 06:00 PM

None of my bikes are rare enough or collectible enough that it would be a great transgression to use something modern on. But I like keeping them equipped as one may have expected to find them used in the day. I have a modern bike with STIs, hydraulic discs, 11 speed cassette, a Garmin Edge, Bontrager illumination, thru axels, clipless pedals and I love all of that on that bike. I will use a Garmin watch though when I ride an older bike and depending on where I ride it I may use some simple clip on lights for visibility. But I also love the contrast of riding one of my older bikes against newer tech. The geometry, friction shifting, managing rim brakes in the rain and the compliments people give me on my bike make riding riding them more fun for me. In fact I often find myself reaching for the down tube to shift when I'm riding my modern bike.

And while I don't give a rodent's sphincter what one does with their own bike, I also agree with what degan posted above, I don't think I would be happy with something looking like a Frankenbike. And while it is off topic, I wish people would pick something for their fixed gear and single speed conversions that they didn't have to cut brazed on shifter bosses off of.

ofajen 11-19-21 10:37 PM


Originally Posted by John E (Post 22312930)
Lights! LEDs day and night, front and rear, preferably USB-chargeable.

Brake pads! KoolStop salmons or bust.

Modern low-compression, low-friction cable housings.

I do have an 8-speed cassette on the mountain bike; original equipment would have been a 6-speed freewheel.

^^^^ This stuff, except that the MTB only has a single cog on the freehub for the last year or so. The road bike has a SS freewheel.

The other tech Iíve added includes quill stem adapters, threadless style stems and cartridge style BBs.

That seems to be about right for now.

Otto

Pompiere 11-20-21 06:54 AM

There are a few things that I not only accept, but are mandatory on my bikes. I use rechargeable blinking LED lights to make me more visible to inattentive drivers on the rural roads I ride. I use a Garmin Edge 200 to keep track of my mileage and which bike it was on. It was the smallest Garmin made, so it isn't much bigger than an Avocet or Cateye computer, but it doesn't need calibrated for each bike. If I wanted an even cleaner look, I could put it in my pocket. I found I liked spd shoes and pedals after getting my first pair when my Avocet Touring shoes were worn out. There are no straps to pinch and I don't like hobbling around on external cleats.

I have some bikes with index shifting, and I like them, but not enough to put index shifting on the older bikes.

John E 11-20-21 07:08 AM


Originally Posted by ofajen (Post 22314072)
The other tech Iíve added includes quill stem adapters, threadless style stems and cartridge style BBs.
Otto

I forgot to mention the cartridge BB on my 1959 Capo and the one I plan to install on my mountain bike.

easyupbug 11-20-21 07:10 AM


Originally Posted by squirtdad (Post 22312327)
this is for me and am ok with people using what they choose

Dual pivot brakes are the best of the best of new tech for me, they work so much better.

I really like 11speed, compact crank and brifters, the function is fantastic, course I would like better if it was silver

I don't plan on moving to disk or electronic, don't hate just no need, disc could change if I were in a wetter steeper area in the future

Not moving from steel frames

hate fugly threadless stems and severly sloping top tubes.....aesthetics based hate

Can't see ever going tubeless, ever. Tubies or clincher with tubes for me

This is me with three slight adjustments:
I bought three Athena 11 Speed Ultra Torque SIlver groupsets when they came out.
I own one titanium I love.
My back is getting slowly worse and I can imagine a step through frame in the future.

easyupbug 11-20-21 07:12 AM


Originally Posted by squirtdad (Post 22312327)
this is for me and am ok with people using what they choose

Dual pivot brakes are the best of the best of new tech for me, they work so much better.

I really like 11speed, compact crank and brifters, the function is fantastic, course I would like better if it was silver

I don't plan on moving to disk or electronic, don't hate just no need, disc could change if I were in a wetter steeper area in the future

Not moving from steel frames

hate fugly threadless stems and severly sloping top tubes.....aesthetics based hate

Can't see ever going tubeless, ever. Tubies or clincher with tubes for me

This is me with three slight adjustments:
I bought three Athena 11 Speed Ultra Torque Silver groupsets when they came out.
I own a one titanium I love.
My back is getting slowly worse and I can imagine a step through frame in the future.

bikingshearer 11-20-21 07:52 AM

Old lugged steel frames + Campy 10sp triples w/Ergo, SPDs and dual pivot brakes = my happiest happy spot.

Old lugged steel for for function and beauty. A well made, well proportioned lugged steel frame is one of the finest, most beautiful things humans have ever created.

Campy 10sp because it works well and still looks right. Triple because I am old, fat and slow and 97.3% of my rides involve non-insignificant hills. Ergo because down tubes get further and further away every year (and because it doesn't have clotheslines).

SPDs because my feet and I like them better than clips and straps. Make that much better.

Dual pivots because they work better than single pivots and are easier to work on than center pulls


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