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-   -   What 'new' tech are you willing to use on your C&V bike? (https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vintage/1242472-what-new-tech-you-willing-use-your-c-v-bike.html)

gearbasher 11-20-21 07:59 AM

Except the frames (steel), saddles (Brooks Pro), seat posts (Campy NR era), bars and stems (Cinelli 66 & 1A), everything is newer technology on my bikes. Oh and I guess maybe the rims, also. (Ambrosio Excellence & Excellight and Mavic Open Pro)

They all have Campy Record 9 or 10 speed groups and Look pedals.

jamesdak 11-20-21 08:54 AM


Originally Posted by degan (Post 22313645)
I have no problem with any level of tech on any sort of C&V bike, the part just has to have the right milieu. For example, a wheel with a cassette hub on a C&V bike can work because we all know there are cassette hubs out there that look the part that can be laced to modern double-walled AL rims that also look the part. What doesn't work IMO is when you put some sort of crazy carbon wheel with 8 bladed spokes on a C&V bike. Even though the two wheels accept the same cassette one sticks out like a sore thumb. The C&V option might weigh a little more, but if that is a concern to you and you have the dough then its a fools errand to start with a C&V bike anyway. The same goes with threadless headsets, brifters, drivetrains, carbon, and pretty much every bike tech advancement.

You mean like this? :D

https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...f8c4765556.jpg

https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...91309d12e3.jpg

https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...9943d95f7d.jpg

Heck, if it gets another old frame back on the road, is fast as heck and a joy to ride, why not? :beer:

Chuck M 11-20-21 10:38 AM


Originally Posted by jamesdak (Post 22314331)

This is very attention grabbing. I kinda like it.

C9H13N 11-20-21 03:09 PM


Originally Posted by gearbasher (Post 22314280)
Except the frames (steel), saddles (Brooks Pro), seat posts (Campy NR era), bars and stems (Cinelli 66 & 1A), everything is newer technology on my bikes. Oh and I guess maybe the rims, also. (Ambrosio Excellence & Excellight and Mavic Open Pro)

They all have Campy Record 9 or 10 speed groups and Look pedals.

Yikes, describes my two most recent vintage road builds to a T.

Lugged steel, Brooks Pro, Campy 2 bolt, Cinelli 66-40 + 1A, Phil hubs to Open Pros and MA2s.

Mine are downtube shift though, one set Campy Doppler retrofriction, one set Suntour power ratchet.

I have a Chorus 10 group with Open Pro wheels kicking around for a third build next yearÖwill share everything else with the other two.

masi61 11-20-21 04:26 PM


Originally Posted by jamesdak (Post 22314331)
You mean like this? :D

https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...f8c4765556.jpg

https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...91309d12e3.jpg

https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...9943d95f7d.jpg

Heck, if it gets another old frame back on the road, is fast as heck and a joy to ride, why not? :beer:

Hey jamesdak - you could school others about combining old and new since your builds that you amass (I've been following your 19 mph thread) all reflect a certain design aesthetic that works. Sort of like looking at Drillium Dude 's creations - so inspirational!

For me do like to embrace modern parts but I concur with what others say about durability, and ongoing utility of the parts.

For me, I feel that tubeless is ripe to pair with vintage hubs. The ride is so unique, I would encourage anybody to try a custom wheel build with tubeless ready rims and then to be properly fitted with tubeless tape/valves and some high performing tubeless tires that punch way, way above their class. Folks don't realize that ride quality is more like tubular than tubed clinchers. The ones I had built up are really good and the work required to get the system up and reliable is worth the effort.

gearbasher 11-20-21 04:37 PM


Originally Posted by C9H13N (Post 22314730)
Yikes, describes my two most recent vintage road builds to a T.

Lugged steel, Brooks Pro, Campy 2 bolt, Cinelli 66-40 + 1A, Phil hubs to Open Pros and MA2s.

Mine are downtube shift though, one set Campy Doppler retrofriction, one set Suntour power ratchet.

I have a Chorus 10 group with Open Pro wheels kicking around for a third build next yearÖwill share everything else with the other two.

Great minds think alike!

Fredo76 11-21-21 12:00 AM

Well, things got pretty Transylvanian here, for awhile.


https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...88443ed990.jpg
Franken Fredo

I've still got my Stealth wheels to try, too:


https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...160cc80a4f.jpg
Stealth wheels

But, after a new powdercoat as a birthday present, I'm really liking the more classic look:


https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...5614e6d386.jpg
Fredo, restored.

Other than slick cables, cork gel bar tape, a taller stem and relocated shifters, it's pretty much as raced 45 years ago. The Phil Wood BB and Shimano vertical dropouts were new at the time. I've since spread the dropouts to 126mm, and fitted a 6-speed 14-28 freewheel, which *might* be low enough, usually. The Brooks Pro is currently receiving The Treatment (R), meanwhile I'm riding a Selle SMP TRK.

ofajen 11-21-21 09:33 AM


Originally Posted by steelbikeguy (Post 22312743)
Like most folks, I run kevlar beaded clinchers on most of my C&V bikes. These are well known to cause very tight fits on some vintage rims. As such, I like to carry an EZ Clincher tire jack to help get the tire mounted after fixing a flat. This tool hasn't been on the market for much more than a year, to my knowledge, so I'd say that it qualifies as "new tech". It works quite well and is small and light. Highly recommended!


https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...6bd27c8c80.jpg

Steve in Peoria

Iíve encountered this with folding tires (Ultra Sport II, for example, but generally all folding tires) that Iíve tried on my Ambrosio extra rims.

I just recently picked up the Kool Stop lever and keep it on the bike. This one looks handy because itís a bit more compact, but they only spec it up to 28s and I run 32s.

Otto

1989Pre 11-21-21 10:35 AM

New technology? No way. That would totally defeat the purpose of riding a vintage bike, in my view.
Unavoidable exceptions; synthetic grease, butyl tubes, contemporary (N.O.S.) tyres.

bikemig 11-21-21 10:47 AM

I modernized one of my old bikes. There is a lot to be said for modern gearing for an all around bike. It's "only" 3 x 8 so I guess it's not that modern, :). Still I love the gearing: 44/32/22 crank with 11-28 8 speed shimano cassette.

https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...16fbcf26f4.jpg

iab 11-21-21 11:00 AM


Originally Posted by 1989Pre (Post 22315345)
New technology? No way. That would totally defeat the purpose of riding a vintage bike, in my view.
Unavoidable exceptions; synthetic grease, butyl tubes, contemporary (N.O.S.) tyres.

I was thinking the same thing. But then I thought, probably for a different thread. In terms of vintage bikes, this is more of a do what you want thread, which is fine by me.

1989Pre 11-21-21 11:08 AM


Originally Posted by iab (Post 22315373)
I was thinking the same thing. But then I thought, probably for a different thread. In terms of vintage bikes, this is more of a do what you want thread, which is fine by me.

Absolutely. I always operate from the vantage-point that although I might-as-well give the most honest reply, my opinion is no more-or-less valid than anyone else's. I hope everyone understands this.

masi61 11-21-21 11:50 AM

Modern tech that helps ameliorate pain should be allowed
 
…for “Eroica” events. I would love to try to do an event on a vintage road bike with 2x6 or 2x7 friction (or allowable down tube index) shifting.

But as a 59 year old with quite a history of foot pain issues associated with bad cycling shoes, I can never see myself running quill pedals with toe clips and straps. I mean, not only is this tech dated - for me it is ergonomically too inefficient the way that the cleated shoe sole would sit too high above the pedal axle…. If I absolutely was required to dispense with my SPD-R’s Dura Ace 9100 road clipless pedals because some Eroica ruling said clips & straps only: I would at least try to do a fresh bearing rebuild on my Shimano DD pedals. But then the there would be a need to acquire some quality euro size 46.5 old-school wooden soled Duegi type cycling shoes with bolt on cleats. Could anybody post a link to some quality modern cycling shoes that would actually be comfortable over a 100+ mile day + still use toe clips & straps?

nlerner 11-21-21 12:19 PM


Originally Posted by masi61 (Post 22315426)
…for “Eroica” events. I would love to try to do an event on a vintage road bike with 2x6 or 2x7 friction (or allowable down tube index) shifting.

But as a 59 year old with quite a history of foot pain issues associated with bad cycling shoes, I can never see myself running quill pedals with toe clips and straps. I mean, not only is this tech dated - for me it is ergonomically too inefficient the way that the cleated shoe sole would sit too high above the pedal axle…. If I absolutely was required to dispense with my SPD-R’s Dura Ace 9100 road clipless pedals because some Eroica ruling said clips & straps only: I would at least try to do a fresh bearing rebuild on my Shimano DD pedals. But then the there would be a need to acquire some quality euro size 46.5 old-school wooden soled Duegi type cycling shoes with bolt on cleats. Could anybody post a link to some quality modern cycling shoes that would actually be comfortable over a 100+ mile day + still use toe clips & straps.

For Cino, I outfitted my bike with a 2 x 6 drivetrain with downtube friction shifters. A few times I struggled to find the right gear (and had too short of a chain to achieve big-big) but overall it was fine. For pedals, I went with new V-O flat pedals with no clips or straps. I have several bikes, some old, some new, with flat pedals and don’t have a problem with slippage. I rode clips and straps for many years and never found them comfortable. I’m on SPDs for the non-vintage rides.

bikemig 11-21-21 12:24 PM


Originally Posted by nlerner (Post 22315449)
For Cino, I outfitted my bike with a 2 x 6 drivetrain with downtube friction shifters. A few times I struggled to find the right gear (and had too short of a chain to achieve big-big) but overall it was fine. For pedals, I went with new V-O flat pedals with no clips or straps. I have several bikes, some old, some new, with flat pedals and donít have a problem with slippage. I rode clips and straps for many years and never found them comfortable. Iím on SPDs for the non-vintage rides.

Flat pedals are great. I find that using bmx style shoes that have a little sticker sole helps when using flat pedals.

masi61 11-21-21 12:53 PM


Originally Posted by nlerner (Post 22315449)
For Cino, I outfitted my bike with a 2 x 6 drivetrain with downtube friction shifters. A few times I struggled to find the right gear (and had too short of a chain to achieve big-big) but overall it was fine. For pedals, I went with new V-O flat pedals with no clips or straps. I have several bikes, some old, some new, with flat pedals and don’t have a problem with slippage. I rode clips and straps for many years and never found them comfortable. I’m on SPDs for the non-vintage rides.


Originally Posted by bikemig;22315454[b
]Flat pedals are great. I find that using bmx style shoes that have a little sticker sole helps when using flat pedals.

I see a double endorsement of flat pedals here. It is something to think about and I guess it would allow more options for foot movement that could prevent hot spots, cramps and allow for better fitting shoes - however, I guess I am a stubborn old roadie that wants to "clip-in" to something. Man, did I ever miss my chance at getting the Duegi's that I wanted back in the day. Instead I chose Puma (cleated) cycling shoes thinking they were more high tech. They ended up absolutely killing off my feet!

merziac 11-21-21 02:23 PM

Not on THE bike but ON me, on the bike. ;)

I'm a fan of flannel, have read about MTB shirts made with polyester and spandex built in, turns out some are all poly. Most of them are very spendy so I was put off by that but many of them are very cool to be sure.

I finally stepped up when I found them at Eddie Bauer and go on sale all the time, often for 1/2 price, still a bit spendy and 100% poly.

These work fantastic for me, layered with merino and a cotton tshirt can be good well into the 40's, I was amazed how well they work and very easy to regulate by unbuttoning, rolling up the sleeves and managing the base layers, keeping hands warm, etc.

EB's are now comfort, stretchy and another level more comfortable with spandex added, LL Bean has wool blend versions and cotton one's as well, may be trying one of those out after Christmas. ;)

Again, these work fantastic and are amazing, IMO.

Turns out they are on sale for 1/2 off right now.

https://www.eddiebauer.com/p/1292459...e%20Blue&size=

I now have a closet full of these and wear them all the time. :twitchy:

hellawatters 11-22-21 12:17 AM

I used to write off all sorts of modern parts were sort of indulgent- but more recently have found myself giving them a pass as long as they can keep an old bike on the road. Iíve especially found myself more ok with more gears (up to 10) especially as 6, 7, 8 speed parts start to get harder to find.

1989Pre 11-22-21 04:09 AM

I put the same Cane Creeks on my 1989. I opted for the compact.


Originally Posted by bikemig (Post 22312691)
I think aero brake levers look swell on old bikes. Plus they brake good and give you a nifty 2d quick release so you can get a wheel with a fat 700 x 35c tire on and off without deflating it.



https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...6d315c4a28.jpg
https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...38f4dae827.jpg


1989Pre 11-22-21 04:27 AM

If that Armstrong is a racer, then it would not look out-of-place for it to use a Benelux rod front mech. I use one on my '63 and it is efficient and a lot of fun.


Originally Posted by ThermionicScott (Post 22313394)
My first road bike was a 1991 model, so cassette hubs, aero brake levers, and indexed DT shifters are my "baseline."

Dyno lighting has improved so much since 1975, especially over the last 10 years or so, there are hardly any downsides to having it on your ride. And the hubs and lights are available with fairly "classic" looks, so they don't have to clash on a vintage bike. Only laziness keeps me from installing a full set of modern dyno lights on every bike...

The only other modern tech I install are the bike computers, but my needs there are so simple (speed and odometer) that I just get the most basic models in current production. I'm a nerd, so I've gotta have something to do that job. ;)
- - - - - -

I must say, though, that my new BikeSmith cotter press has made cottered cranks much less intimidating. Every so often, I think it would be cool to have a road bike with all the older tech on it, like tubulars, cottered cranks, lever front derailleur, etc. Something "heroic."


ThermionicScott 11-22-21 09:09 AM


Originally Posted by 1989Pre (Post 22316120)
If that Armstrong is a racer, then it would not look out-of-place for it to use a Benelux rod front mech. I use one on my '63 and it is efficient and a lot of fun.

It's a 3-speed, so outfitting it with derailleurs of any kind would take some doing. (And decrease the diversity of my collection.) ;)

Schlafen 11-22-21 12:25 PM

Lol.

Just stating the obvious here but 'modern' is used as 'current' in most general situations.

Indexed shifting is... ancient, not vintage in 2021.

30 year old Ultegra 9 speed STI is not modern tech, it's vintage, borderline ancient even.

Wet Coast Rider 11-22-21 01:35 PM


Originally Posted by masi61 (Post 22315476)
I see a double endorsement of flat pedals here. It is something to think about and I guess it would allow more options for foot movement that could prevent hot spots, cramps and allow for better fitting shoes - however, I guess I am a stubborn old roadie that wants to "clip-in" to something. Man, did I ever miss my chance at getting the Duegi's that I wanted back in the day. Instead I chose Puma (cleated) cycling shoes thinking they were more high tech. They ended up absolutely killing off my feet!

Flat pedals are great for a bike that gets used to get around town, grab groceries etc. I have some on my 80s Shogun touring/commuter bike currently.

That said, they look fairly out of place on a bike that is otherwise period correct. If you've added modern lights, fenders, brake levers etc to your vintage frame then the flats look fine.

merziac 11-22-21 04:25 PM


Originally Posted by Schlafen (Post 22316635)
Lol.

Just stating the obvious here but 'modern' is used as 'current' in most general situations.

Indexed shifting is... ancient, not vintage in 2021.

30 year old Ultegra 9 speed STI is not modern tech, it's vintage, borderline ancient even.

Maybe so but in our realm, downtube = ancient vintage, index = vintage vintage, STI = modern vintage, C+V ain't current, modern or general but we do embrace all of it as needed to suit ourselves. ;)

Ex Pres 11-23-21 02:40 PM

I have Ergo on my newer bikes, but the old steel get the downtube shifters, save for my MiamiVice Ironman where I installed 8s Sachs Ergo, well, just because.
No disc brakes, tubeless tires or electronic shifting.
And any pre-'83 bike that would have would or should have come with tubulars, ride tubulars.

But I don't consider myself a retrogrouch, though I've never even test-ridden a full carbon bike.
I do ride my 2000-2010 10s Ergo clincher shod bikes as often as anything else.

I do want to build up an older frame for gravel/cross w/10s indexed Campy bar-ends running 38-40s.


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