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What 'new' tech are you willing to use on your C&V bike?

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What 'new' tech are you willing to use on your C&V bike?

Old 11-19-21, 02:30 PM
  #51  
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Originally Posted by Roger M View Post
Back in the day this worked well(still drink one on occasion. Ex: Cino 2013)



This modern version seems to work
better...
Don't forget Olympia
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Old 11-19-21, 02:50 PM
  #52  
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I have no problem with any level of tech on any sort of C&V bike, the part just has to have the right milieu. For example, a wheel with a cassette hub on a C&V bike can work because we all know there are cassette hubs out there that look the part that can be laced to modern double-walled AL rims that also look the part. What doesn't work IMO is when you put some sort of crazy carbon wheel with 8 bladed spokes on a C&V bike. Even though the two wheels accept the same cassette one sticks out like a sore thumb. The C&V option might weigh a little more, but if that is a concern to you and you have the dough then its a fools errand to start with a C&V bike anyway. The same goes with threadless headsets, brifters, drivetrains, carbon, and pretty much every bike tech advancement.
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Old 11-19-21, 02:55 PM
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Originally Posted by degan View Post
I have no problem with any level of tech on any sort of C&V bike, the part just has to have the right milieu. For example, a wheel with a cassette hub on a C&V bike can work because we all know there are cassette hubs out there that look the part that can be laced to modern double-walled AL rims that also look the part. What doesn't work IMO is when you put some sort of crazy carbon wheel with 8 bladed spokes on a C&V bike. Even though the two wheels accept the same cassette one sticks out like a sore thumb. The C&V option might weigh a little more, but if that is a concern to you and you have the dough then its a fools errand to start with a C&V bike anyway. The same goes with threadless headsets, brifters, drivetrains, carbon, and pretty much every bike tech advancement.
Well said.
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Old 11-19-21, 06:00 PM
  #54  
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None of my bikes are rare enough or collectible enough that it would be a great transgression to use something modern on. But I like keeping them equipped as one may have expected to find them used in the day. I have a modern bike with STIs, hydraulic discs, 11 speed cassette, a Garmin Edge, Bontrager illumination, thru axels, clipless pedals and I love all of that on that bike. I will use a Garmin watch though when I ride an older bike and depending on where I ride it I may use some simple clip on lights for visibility. But I also love the contrast of riding one of my older bikes against newer tech. The geometry, friction shifting, managing rim brakes in the rain and the compliments people give me on my bike make riding riding them more fun for me. In fact I often find myself reaching for the down tube to shift when I'm riding my modern bike.

And while I don't give a rodent's sphincter what one does with their own bike, I also agree with what degan posted above, I don't think I would be happy with something looking like a Frankenbike. And while it is off topic, I wish people would pick something for their fixed gear and single speed conversions that they didn't have to cut brazed on shifter bosses off of.
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Old 11-19-21, 10:37 PM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by John E View Post
Lights! LEDs day and night, front and rear, preferably USB-chargeable.

Brake pads! KoolStop salmons or bust.

Modern low-compression, low-friction cable housings.

I do have an 8-speed cassette on the mountain bike; original equipment would have been a 6-speed freewheel.
^^^^ This stuff, except that the MTB only has a single cog on the freehub for the last year or so. The road bike has a SS freewheel.

The other tech I’ve added includes quill stem adapters, threadless style stems and cartridge style BBs.

That seems to be about right for now.

Otto
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Old 11-20-21, 06:54 AM
  #56  
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There are a few things that I not only accept, but are mandatory on my bikes. I use rechargeable blinking LED lights to make me more visible to inattentive drivers on the rural roads I ride. I use a Garmin Edge 200 to keep track of my mileage and which bike it was on. It was the smallest Garmin made, so it isn't much bigger than an Avocet or Cateye computer, but it doesn't need calibrated for each bike. If I wanted an even cleaner look, I could put it in my pocket. I found I liked spd shoes and pedals after getting my first pair when my Avocet Touring shoes were worn out. There are no straps to pinch and I don't like hobbling around on external cleats.

I have some bikes with index shifting, and I like them, but not enough to put index shifting on the older bikes.
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Old 11-20-21, 07:08 AM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by ofajen View Post
The other tech I’ve added includes quill stem adapters, threadless style stems and cartridge style BBs.
Otto
I forgot to mention the cartridge BB on my 1959 Capo and the one I plan to install on my mountain bike.
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Old 11-20-21, 07:10 AM
  #58  
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Originally Posted by squirtdad View Post
this is for me and am ok with people using what they choose

Dual pivot brakes are the best of the best of new tech for me, they work so much better.

I really like 11speed, compact crank and brifters, the function is fantastic, course I would like better if it was silver

I don't plan on moving to disk or electronic, don't hate just no need, disc could change if I were in a wetter steeper area in the future

Not moving from steel frames

hate fugly threadless stems and severly sloping top tubes.....aesthetics based hate

Can't see ever going tubeless, ever. Tubies or clincher with tubes for me
This is me with three slight adjustments:
I bought three Athena 11 Speed Ultra Torque SIlver groupsets when they came out.
I own one titanium I love.
My back is getting slowly worse and I can imagine a step through frame in the future.
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Old 11-20-21, 07:12 AM
  #59  
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Originally Posted by squirtdad View Post
this is for me and am ok with people using what they choose

Dual pivot brakes are the best of the best of new tech for me, they work so much better.

I really like 11speed, compact crank and brifters, the function is fantastic, course I would like better if it was silver

I don't plan on moving to disk or electronic, don't hate just no need, disc could change if I were in a wetter steeper area in the future

Not moving from steel frames

hate fugly threadless stems and severly sloping top tubes.....aesthetics based hate

Can't see ever going tubeless, ever. Tubies or clincher with tubes for me
This is me with three slight adjustments:
I bought three Athena 11 Speed Ultra Torque Silver groupsets when they came out.
I own a one titanium I love.
My back is getting slowly worse and I can imagine a step through frame in the future.
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Old 11-20-21, 07:52 AM
  #60  
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Old lugged steel frames + Campy 10sp triples w/Ergo, SPDs and dual pivot brakes = my happiest happy spot.

Old lugged steel for for function and beauty. A well made, well proportioned lugged steel frame is one of the finest, most beautiful things humans have ever created.

Campy 10sp because it works well and still looks right. Triple because I am old, fat and slow and 97.3% of my rides involve non-insignificant hills. Ergo because down tubes get further and further away every year (and because it doesn't have clotheslines).

SPDs because my feet and I like them better than clips and straps. Make that much better.

Dual pivots because they work better than single pivots and are easier to work on than center pulls
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Old 11-20-21, 07:59 AM
  #61  
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Except the frames (steel), saddles (Brooks Pro), seat posts (Campy NR era), bars and stems (Cinelli 66 & 1A), everything is newer technology on my bikes. Oh and I guess maybe the rims, also. (Ambrosio Excellence & Excellight and Mavic Open Pro)

They all have Campy Record 9 or 10 speed groups and Look pedals.

Last edited by gearbasher; 11-20-21 at 08:26 AM.
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Old 11-20-21, 08:54 AM
  #62  
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Originally Posted by degan View Post
I have no problem with any level of tech on any sort of C&V bike, the part just has to have the right milieu. For example, a wheel with a cassette hub on a C&V bike can work because we all know there are cassette hubs out there that look the part that can be laced to modern double-walled AL rims that also look the part. What doesn't work IMO is when you put some sort of crazy carbon wheel with 8 bladed spokes on a C&V bike. Even though the two wheels accept the same cassette one sticks out like a sore thumb. The C&V option might weigh a little more, but if that is a concern to you and you have the dough then its a fools errand to start with a C&V bike anyway. The same goes with threadless headsets, brifters, drivetrains, carbon, and pretty much every bike tech advancement.
You mean like this?







Heck, if it gets another old frame back on the road, is fast as heck and a joy to ride, why not?
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Old 11-20-21, 10:38 AM
  #63  
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Originally Posted by jamesdak View Post
You mean like this?
This is very attention grabbing. I kinda like it.
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Old 11-20-21, 03:09 PM
  #64  
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Originally Posted by gearbasher View Post
Except the frames (steel), saddles (Brooks Pro), seat posts (Campy NR era), bars and stems (Cinelli 66 & 1A), everything is newer technology on my bikes. Oh and I guess maybe the rims, also. (Ambrosio Excellence & Excellight and Mavic Open Pro)

They all have Campy Record 9 or 10 speed groups and Look pedals.
Yikes, describes my two most recent vintage road builds to a T.

Lugged steel, Brooks Pro, Campy 2 bolt, Cinelli 66-40 + 1A, Phil hubs to Open Pros and MA2s.

Mine are downtube shift though, one set Campy Doppler retrofriction, one set Suntour power ratchet.

I have a Chorus 10 group with Open Pro wheels kicking around for a third build next year…will share everything else with the other two.
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Old 11-20-21, 04:26 PM
  #65  
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Originally Posted by jamesdak View Post
You mean like this?







Heck, if it gets another old frame back on the road, is fast as heck and a joy to ride, why not?
Hey jamesdak - you could school others about combining old and new since your builds that you amass (I've been following your 19 mph thread) all reflect a certain design aesthetic that works. Sort of like looking at Drillium Dude 's creations - so inspirational!

For me do like to embrace modern parts but I concur with what others say about durability, and ongoing utility of the parts.

For me, I feel that tubeless is ripe to pair with vintage hubs. The ride is so unique, I would encourage anybody to try a custom wheel build with tubeless ready rims and then to be properly fitted with tubeless tape/valves and some high performing tubeless tires that punch way, way above their class. Folks don't realize that ride quality is more like tubular than tubed clinchers. The ones I had built up are really good and the work required to get the system up and reliable is worth the effort.
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Old 11-20-21, 04:37 PM
  #66  
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Originally Posted by C9H13N View Post
Yikes, describes my two most recent vintage road builds to a T.

Lugged steel, Brooks Pro, Campy 2 bolt, Cinelli 66-40 + 1A, Phil hubs to Open Pros and MA2s.

Mine are downtube shift though, one set Campy Doppler retrofriction, one set Suntour power ratchet.

I have a Chorus 10 group with Open Pro wheels kicking around for a third build next year…will share everything else with the other two.
Great minds think alike!
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Old 11-21-21, 12:00 AM
  #67  
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Well, things got pretty Transylvanian here, for awhile.



Franken Fredo

I've still got my Stealth wheels to try, too:



Stealth wheels

But, after a new powdercoat as a birthday present, I'm really liking the more classic look:



Fredo, restored.

Other than slick cables, cork gel bar tape, a taller stem and relocated shifters, it's pretty much as raced 45 years ago. The Phil Wood BB and Shimano vertical dropouts were new at the time. I've since spread the dropouts to 126mm, and fitted a 6-speed 14-28 freewheel, which *might* be low enough, usually. The Brooks Pro is currently receiving The Treatment (R), meanwhile I'm riding a Selle SMP TRK.
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Old 11-21-21, 09:33 AM
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Originally Posted by steelbikeguy View Post
Like most folks, I run kevlar beaded clinchers on most of my C&V bikes. These are well known to cause very tight fits on some vintage rims. As such, I like to carry an EZ Clincher tire jack to help get the tire mounted after fixing a flat. This tool hasn't been on the market for much more than a year, to my knowledge, so I'd say that it qualifies as "new tech". It works quite well and is small and light. Highly recommended!




Steve in Peoria
I’ve encountered this with folding tires (Ultra Sport II, for example, but generally all folding tires) that I’ve tried on my Ambrosio extra rims.

I just recently picked up the Kool Stop lever and keep it on the bike. This one looks handy because it’s a bit more compact, but they only spec it up to 28s and I run 32s.

Otto
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Old 11-21-21, 10:35 AM
  #69  
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New technology? No way. That would totally defeat the purpose of riding a vintage bike, in my view.
Unavoidable exceptions; synthetic grease, butyl tubes, contemporary (N.O.S.) tyres.
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Old 11-21-21, 10:47 AM
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I modernized one of my old bikes. There is a lot to be said for modern gearing for an all around bike. It's "only" 3 x 8 so I guess it's not that modern, . Still I love the gearing: 44/32/22 crank with 11-28 8 speed shimano cassette.

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Old 11-21-21, 11:00 AM
  #71  
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Originally Posted by 1989Pre View Post
New technology? No way. That would totally defeat the purpose of riding a vintage bike, in my view.
Unavoidable exceptions; synthetic grease, butyl tubes, contemporary (N.O.S.) tyres.
I was thinking the same thing. But then I thought, probably for a different thread. In terms of vintage bikes, this is more of a do what you want thread, which is fine by me.
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Old 11-21-21, 11:08 AM
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Originally Posted by iab View Post
I was thinking the same thing. But then I thought, probably for a different thread. In terms of vintage bikes, this is more of a do what you want thread, which is fine by me.
Absolutely. I always operate from the vantage-point that although I might-as-well give the most honest reply, my opinion is no more-or-less valid than anyone else's. I hope everyone understands this.
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Old 11-21-21, 11:50 AM
  #73  
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Modern tech that helps ameliorate pain should be allowed

…for “Eroica” events. I would love to try to do an event on a vintage road bike with 2x6 or 2x7 friction (or allowable down tube index) shifting.

But as a 59 year old with quite a history of foot pain issues associated with bad cycling shoes, I can never see myself running quill pedals with toe clips and straps. I mean, not only is this tech dated - for me it is ergonomically too inefficient the way that the cleated shoe sole would sit too high above the pedal axle…. If I absolutely was required to dispense with my SPD-R’s Dura Ace 9100 road clipless pedals because some Eroica ruling said clips & straps only: I would at least try to do a fresh bearing rebuild on my Shimano DD pedals. But then the there would be a need to acquire some quality euro size 46.5 old-school wooden soled Duegi type cycling shoes with bolt on cleats. Could anybody post a link to some quality modern cycling shoes that would actually be comfortable over a 100+ mile day + still use toe clips & straps?

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Old 11-21-21, 12:19 PM
  #74  
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Originally Posted by masi61 View Post
…for “Eroica” events. I would love to try to do an event on a vintage road bike with 2x6 or 2x7 friction (or allowable down tube index) shifting.

But as a 59 year old with quite a history of foot pain issues associated with bad cycling shoes, I can never see myself running quill pedals with toe clips and straps. I mean, not only is this tech dated - for me it is ergonomically too inefficient the way that the cleated shoe sole would sit too high above the pedal axle…. If I absolutely was required to dispense with my SPD-R’s Dura Ace 9100 road clipless pedals because some Eroica ruling said clips & straps only: I would at least try to do a fresh bearing rebuild on my Shimano DD pedals. But then the there would be a need to acquire some quality euro size 46.5 old-school wooden soled Duegi type cycling shoes with bolt on cleats. Could anybody post a link to some quality modern cycling shoes that would actually be comfortable over a 100+ mile day + still use toe clips & straps.
For Cino, I outfitted my bike with a 2 x 6 drivetrain with downtube friction shifters. A few times I struggled to find the right gear (and had too short of a chain to achieve big-big) but overall it was fine. For pedals, I went with new V-O flat pedals with no clips or straps. I have several bikes, some old, some new, with flat pedals and don’t have a problem with slippage. I rode clips and straps for many years and never found them comfortable. I’m on SPDs for the non-vintage rides.
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Old 11-21-21, 12:24 PM
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Originally Posted by nlerner View Post
For Cino, I outfitted my bike with a 2 x 6 drivetrain with downtube friction shifters. A few times I struggled to find the right gear (and had too short of a chain to achieve big-big) but overall it was fine. For pedals, I went with new V-O flat pedals with no clips or straps. I have several bikes, some old, some new, with flat pedals and don’t have a problem with slippage. I rode clips and straps for many years and never found them comfortable. I’m on SPDs for the non-vintage rides.
Flat pedals are great. I find that using bmx style shoes that have a little sticker sole helps when using flat pedals.
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