Bike Forums

Bike Forums (https://www.bikeforums.net/forum.php)
-   Classic & Vintage (https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vintage/)
-   -   Weird vintage tech thread. (https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vintage/1242897-weird-vintage-tech-thread.html)

tcs 11-29-21 09:40 PM


Originally Posted by thumpism (Post 22322790)
It wasn't as bad as you'd think.

As I recall, Bicycling road tested a Hypercycle recumbent back in the day and said heavy (emergency) braking was a thrill-seeking, death-defying event.

tcs 11-29-21 09:45 PM


Originally Posted by ThermionicScott (Post 22323623)
What's "weird" here? Schwinn made zillions of 1x5 bikes and people converted lots of these old bikes to single-speed or fixed.

With Shimano Front Freewheel System cranks? Really?

tcs 11-29-21 11:28 PM

I've seen these referred to as 'donkey bikes' or 'velocinos'.


https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...830bf7f7fe.png

ThermionicScott 11-30-21 08:56 AM


Originally Posted by tcs (Post 22324098)
With Shimano Front Freewheel System cranks? Really?

Is it? I missed that. :lol:

SJX426 11-30-21 04:32 PM

Pederson Self-Engagement System - The calipers are on a spring loaded helical track. When the brake is applied, the resistance pulls the caliper in towards the rim, increasing the brake force.
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/...c6599761_b.jpgP1010340 on Flickr
Suntour removed the front brake from the market due to lock ups potential and litigation risk.

grant40 12-01-21 04:48 PM

https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...ac54d3f8f6.jpg

Smokinapankake 12-01-21 05:32 PM


Originally Posted by grant40 (Post 22325986)

Imagine threading those cables…

Smokinapankake 12-01-21 05:34 PM

[img]blob:https://www.bikeforums.net/afedda3b-79f6-44e6-af8b-f12d7bedd8da[/img]

That Trimble reminded me of these; very similar to Brent Trimble’s carbon monocoque MTB…
Oops, I must’ve done something funky (again) google Sbike in images and you’ll get there. If you want…

noobinsf 12-01-21 06:16 PM


Originally Posted by tcs (Post 22324149)
I've seen these referred to as 'donkey bikes' or 'velocinos'.


https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...830bf7f7fe.png

This seems like a bike version of the VW bus, where your legs -- or in this case, your face -- is your first line of protection. Watch those potholes.

grant40 12-01-21 10:26 PM

Cottered front freewheel.

https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...ee0612587f.jpg

Drillium Dude 12-01-21 10:34 PM

Don't ask me - I haven't a clue. But it sure is weird:

https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...b768574dc4.png

DD

SJX426 12-02-21 06:15 AM

Lookes like the chain is doubled and the adjustment is the sliding of the bb on a shaft! Nice rear brake!
Did someone take this seriously?
https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...674a2a61d2.jpg
https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...102dee24ec.jpg

T-Mar 12-02-21 06:32 AM


Originally Posted by Drillium Dude (Post 22326255)
Don't ask me - I haven't a clue. But it sure is weird:

That is an very early 1890s Victor bicycle by the Overman Wheel Co. They were very popular in their day and extremely collectable to-day. Pneumatic tyres were the new technology and solid tyre proponents like Victor used used suspension forks in attempt to soften the ride and compete with pneumatic bicycles.
https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...d0e4a54e0d.jpg

steelbikeguy 12-02-21 06:39 AM


Originally Posted by Drillium Dude (Post 22326255)
Don't ask me - I haven't a clue. But it sure is weird:

https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...b768574dc4.png

DD

I've ridden a bike with solid tires once, so I completely understand the desire/need for a front suspension like that!

The bottom bracket arrangement is similar to a bike on display at the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis. The whole bottom bracket is adjusted fore & aft as a way to tension the chain. It makes me wonder when horizontal dropouts were invented.

a couple of shots of the bike at the Museum of Transportation.....


https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...3f6d837a63.jpg

https://cimg1.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...9ba35cdac6.jpg

I'm not sure why the manufacturer used radial spoking on the rear wheel. Tangential spoking was used on the earlier Ordinary bikes, so it existed when this bike was built.

Steve in Peoria

52telecaster 12-02-21 06:44 AM


Originally Posted by thumpism (Post 22322377)
FFS had its place in the cycling universe. Derailleur operation mystified a lot of folks who did could not grasp "You must be pedaling when you shift" and coordinate the movements. FFS solved that and was widespread at the time, found on several models of many U.S and Asian brands. Many of those bikes also featured Positron derailleurs, the granddaddy of SIS. Maybe not desirable high-end stuff, but it certainly simplified and improved the cycling experience for a whole lot of folks.

I assembled a ton of those bikes and when positron used a solid shift cable with continuous housing it worked quite well. It wasn't light or beautiful but it did work.

Rocket-Sauce 12-02-21 07:10 AM


Originally Posted by thumpism (Post 22321427)
Timex Velo-Trak wristwatch/cycle computer. I had one of these. First seen at the last (I think) Atlantic City Interbike show, it struck me as a terrific idea. Take that as proof of my status as a leading reverse indicator. I was later able to buy one for $20 at K-Mart when they were dumped. I think I used it once before it broke.
https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/d~oAA...SK/s-l1600.jpg

I had one too that I bought at Nashbar for something like $15-20. I never took it out of the box. not sure why...:foo:

T-Mar 12-02-21 07:12 AM


Originally Posted by SJX426 (Post 22326378)
Lookes like the chain is doubled and the adjustment is the sliding of the bb on a shaft! Nice rear brake!
Did someone take this seriously?

I don't believe that the chain is doubled, as that would requitre dual chainwheels and cogs, or at least a groove cut into them to accommodate a middle chain plate. However, they were very wide. Here's detail photo showing the width and Overman's hubs, with straight pull spokes that produced a cross pattern. Overman were quite inventive, They also develped hollow, aero rims and hollow, large diameter, bottom bracket spindles.
https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...90f6e63f32.jpg

T-Mar 12-02-21 07:33 AM

Here's my favourite weird chain technology, the 1890s Simpson lever chain. I became aware of it in the 1970s, via the famous Toulouse-Lautrec poster. Originally, I thought that he had committed a faux pas and drawn the teeth on the chain, instead of the cogs and chainwheel. Only decades later did I discover that Toulouse-Lautrec was an avid cyclist who regularly attended competitions at the Paris velodromes and that his representation of the Simpson Chain was accurate.

Simpson claimed a mechanical advantage over traditional chains. The benefit reportedly came from driving at two different levels, at two different pitchs, as a result of the triangular links. The inner pins at the base of the triangle were driven by the chainwheel while the outer pins, at the peak of the triangle, drove the cog on the rear wheel.

Of course, these claims were the subject of much ridicule, Consequently, Simpson set up a series of match races for June 1896 in which he gave 10:1 odds for anybody using traditional chains that could beat his sponsored riders. The races, held at the Catford track in London, reportedly drew crowds of 12,000 to 20,000 spectators. All the eveents were distance races, preformed with pacing bicycles consisting of triplets, quadruples and quintuples (i.e three, four and five rider bicycles). Simpson prevailed but only because of the superiority of his team. The company would go bankrupt in 1898, when the bicycle boom went bust.

The poster depicts a similar 1896 event at the Vélodrome de la Seine in Paris. The Simpson chain would probably had been relegated to obscurity had it not been for this poster being produced by an artist of Toulous-Lautrec's stature. However, it merits attention beyond the artist and chain. In the back ground, upper left, is a depiction of what appears to be two bicycles with five riders on each (quintuplets). Of more interest is the solo cyclist in the foreground. It is Simpson sponsored rider Constant Huret, 1900 World Champion, and brother of André Huret, of wingnut and derailleur fame.
https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...1c5fd51df0.jpg
https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...d8bb0dff9f.jpg
https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...94312a7bd9.jpg

Rocket-Sauce 12-02-21 07:37 AM

Loads of fun stuff here:

The Bicycle Museum of Bad Ideas


In particular:
Superfast chains. Looks like it could use some help from those little blue pills...
http://pardo.net/bike/pic/mobi/d.pmp...mJw~~60_57.JPG

Bianchi84 12-02-21 08:01 AM


Originally Posted by SJX426 (Post 22324879)
Pederson Self-Engagement System - The calipers are on a spring loaded helical track. When the brake is applied, the resistance pulls the caliper in towards the rim, increasing the brake force.
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/...c6599761_b.jpgP1010340 on Flickr
Suntour removed the front brake from the market due to lock ups potential and litigation risk.

How about 3 in one photo? I DO have the Pedersen SE Brake front version with Odessey Straddle Rods instead of cable on an SR Litage bonded aluminum fork. This is on a 1985 Cannondale SM 600 with 26" front wheel and 24" rear wheel.
https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...f0ea25dece.jpg
https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...32ab1741a2.jpg
https://cimg1.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...b04156b4b0.jpg
Also have Bullseye Cranks. Maybe not weird, but kind of ahead of their time with 2-piece construction.

steelbikeguy 12-02-21 01:34 PM


Originally Posted by T-Mar (Post 22326426)
Simpson claimed a mechanical advantage over traditional chains. The benefit reportedly came from driving at two different levels, at two different pitchs, as a result of the triangular links. The inner pins at the base of the triangle were driven by the chainwheel while the outer pins, at the peak of the triangle, drove the cog on the rear wheel.

https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...1c5fd51df0.jpg

that is one of the best crazy ideas in the history of bikes, imho!
It combines unnecessary mechanical complexity with a fairly ludicrous claim of improved performance. At least as good as oval chainrings, curved crank arms, etc.
For some reason, it brings to mind the amplifier with the knob that goes up to eleven. :)

I'd seen the part of The Dancing Chain that discusses it, but don't think I'd seen a modern photo of one. Very cool!

Steve in Peoria

steelbikeguy 12-02-21 01:43 PM


Originally Posted by martl (Post 22322264)
nice find :)

Taalking about silly early computers, i always loved the Ciclomaster II "Alti". As the name implies, it had an altimeter function. This was not done by measuring air pressure, as is common now, but worked in a mechanical way, where the *position* of some sort of pendulum was measured electronically,. elevation and climb rate were calculated based on measured speed and inclination.
I never had one but i'm told it did not work as precise as one would imagine :)

https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...e952e5fc43.jpg

In the defense of whoever designed this, pendulums were/are not all that rare as a means of measuring slope. I used to deal with inclination sensors in my job, and was familiar with the current technology. In fact, I found an inclination sensor on the road while riding once! It must have fallen off a Klaus combine (a piece of farm equipment), and it used a pendulum in an oil bath. The oil just slowed the pendulum and made it less sensitive to mild vibration, bumps, etc. The pendulum was connected to a potentiometer, which provided a voltage that changed with the slope angle. Nothing fancy or expensive, but it did the job, more or less.

These have largely been replaced by solid state accelerometers that are fairly small and cheap. Surprisingly, GPS receivers seem to be cheap enough and accurate enough that most modern devices just keep track of their X, Y, and Z position, and can track the elevation gain by simple addition and subtraction.

Steve in Peoria

steelbikeguy 12-02-21 02:02 PM

Have I mentioned the curved crank arm yet?
It may have been the first among the various schemes to vary the mechanical advantage as the cranks go around.
The concept, as I understand it, was that the crank would bend during the power portion of the crank stroke. The bending would cause the crank to get a bit longer, increasing the rider's leverage and allowing more power to be generated.... or something like that?
Like Biopace or the original Rotor crank with the cam driven rings, or the Powercam with the cams that changed the chainrings rotational position as the crank rotated (similar to the Rotor), there wasn't much data to support the claims, but it looked high tech and there was probably some sort of placebo effect.

The tandem that featured the cranks for both the captain and stoker (although the captain is in back, and the stoker is in front.

https://live.staticflickr.com/2830/1...ecda52_c_d.jpg


https://live.staticflickr.com/3748/1...2c4caa_c_d.jpg

The tandem was built by the Ide company (or sold under the Ide name?) here in Peoria a long time ago!

Steve in Peoria

Drillium Dude 12-02-21 03:43 PM


Originally Posted by T-Mar (Post 22326386)
That is an very early 1890s Victor bicycle by the Overman Wheel Co. They were very popular in their day and extremely collectable to-day. Pneumatic tyres were the new technology and solid tyre proponents like Victor used used suspension forks in attempt to soften the ride and compete with pneumatic bicycles.

Cool, thanks! I saw this years ago at a swap meet and thought it was pretty interesting. Any ideas as to the function of the two small fixtures midway along the curve of the forks?

Wish I had a close-up of some of the details; for example, I can't quite make out exactly what the linkage in front of the head tube goes and if it's gear or brake related.

Shoulda given it a test ride :)

DD

tricky 12-02-21 04:10 PM


Originally Posted by CMAW (Post 22322548)

Suspension bikes kicked butt in the few cobble races they participated in before they were banned.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:02 PM.


Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.