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Things we do that don't really have a practical purpose

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Things we do that don't really have a practical purpose

Old 12-19-21, 07:57 PM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by steelbikeguy View Post
My take has always been that some places had certain practices or traditions, and these practices never spread broadly. Naturally, folks like to preserve these traditional practices, but I don't recall any/many saying that other practices were inherently wrong.

As far as stylish with no real purpose... is that a bad thing? Sometimes it's just fun.
actually, it does add a bit of flair to a monochromatic fillet brazed bike.

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Part of the beauty of bikes, especially vintage bikes, is the inherent beauty of a well brazed, thinned lug, a perfectly cabled and bar wrapped handlebar. Pin stripping doesn't make a bike ride better or go faster, but I lust after them.

Getting a bike set up just right, yeah, makes me feel good. Feeling good helps me go faster and longer.

Nothing wrong with being stylish, it's probably what draws most of us to vintage bikes. Modern bikes look soulless to me.
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Old 12-19-21, 08:17 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by iab View Post
Large flange hubs - they do look sweet though
Wrapping bar tape a particular way.
Twisting toe straps
Photos of the drive side
Even brake cables
High brake cables
Definitely yes on the first five 😎
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Old 12-19-21, 08:26 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by non-fixie View Post
It's a hobby, not a religion.
Sacrilege!
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Old 12-19-21, 08:43 PM
  #29  
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Toe-in brakes
A rear brake
Gum hoods
Anything on a cable end
Directional tire tread
Finishing tape
Valve length
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Old 12-19-21, 09:15 PM
  #30  
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Pulling up on the back stroke when not on a 20+% upslope..
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Old 12-19-21, 09:43 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
... your method would let you consistently work the QR lever and nut with the same hands.
"Hands"? Plural?
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Old 12-19-21, 09:45 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by SurferRosa View Post
"Hands"? Plural?
I feared that wouldn't come out clearly. What I meant was that you could always work the lever with your left hand, and the nut with your right hand, facing the end of the bike.
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Old 12-19-21, 09:50 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by obrentharris View Post
... my wheel building reputation was based on the quality of my wheels not on my "attention to detail."


I think one follows the other. I realize you can build great wheels and decline to do that one thing in lining up the hub label with the stem. But doing all the little tiny things like that -- and there are dozens of them in regard to building up a bike -- gives me far more confidence when flying down a descent with traffic.
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Old 12-19-21, 10:04 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
What I meant was that you could always work the lever with your left hand, and the nut with your right hand...
Gotcha. But I've never really done it that way. I use the left hand on the rear lever, which is parallel with the nds chainstay, pointed forward. I like to spend a little more time with the rear, getting it just right. Not too tight and definitely not too loose.

I do use my right hand on the front lever, which points up, following the curve of the ds fork. It's not nearly as tight as the rear. It's just secure. If I feel it requires too much tightening to keep the hub from feeling loose, then I need to readjust the hub.

Fortunately most of the hubs are Campy Record. Super easy to adjust, and they tend to stay that way.
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Old 12-20-21, 12:02 AM
  #35  
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Avoiding unicrown forks.

Well, OK, that does have a practical purpose -- it means not looking at something eye-gougingly ugly.
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Old 12-20-21, 02:14 AM
  #36  
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Big ring on my cranksets...it serves absolutely no practical purpose, but I can't bring myself to leave it off. I replaced the big ring with a bash guard on my commuter for a while but it always bugged me
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Old 12-20-21, 02:37 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by Andy_K View Post
Big ring on my cranksets...it serves absolutely no practical purpose, but I can't bring myself to leave it off. I replaced the big ring with a bash guard on my commuter for a while but it always bugged me
You just have to regularly find a proper hill to use it on.

I found a 53 to go with the 11 out back after spinning out on some of the downhills the first time I went to Crater Lake.

I had planned to change it and the 24t inner ring back out but we know how that goes.



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Old 12-20-21, 02:43 AM
  #38  
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1. Marriage
2. Owning more than three bikes.
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Old 12-20-21, 04:00 AM
  #39  
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Back in my twenties, in New Haven, I dated a smart Yalie girl who lived with some equally clever roommates. The first time I visited their apartment, I noticed that they kept a two-column "Cool"/"Uncool" list on their refrigerator door. I remarked on an item in one list that I thought arguably belonged in the other. She looked at me pityingly: 'They're both "Uncool" lists. Caring whether you're cool makes you uncool.'

Horizontal top tubes, lugs, gotta-be-steel, tan sidewalls, QR lever orientation, hub logo orientation, rim labels, etc., etc. Club rules! I trust that you guys (!) still painstakingly denude your golf shirts of the Izod label with a seam ripper.

The fact that the Velominati rules are meant to be taken ironically, like Celia's "Cool/Uncool" list, or at least with some self-awareness, as in Gugie's opening post, was clearly missed by many people replying here. Maybe this will help:


Last edited by Trakhak; 12-20-21 at 04:07 AM.
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Old 12-20-21, 04:27 AM
  #40  
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N + 1
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Old 12-20-21, 07:08 AM
  #41  
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I will be flamed by some but I insist on the right brake lever cabled to the front brake. For me it is practical as I have used my right hand for the front since I can remember. Since it is practical, I guess it should be mentioned!
I always end my bar tape finishing tape at the bottom of the handlebar and always wrap from back to font from the top.
Trim cables about an inch and a half from the clamp.
usually cap the ends of the cable with super glue, some times with a cap and sometime without. Try to color coordinate the cap if used.
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Old 12-20-21, 07:19 AM
  #42  
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Look on a ("road") tyre for indications that it should be mounted so that it spins one way rather than the other, and dutifully make sure to mount it in the way indicated.

(I'm not entirely sure that the orientation is completely meaningless, but I don't notice any difference in use.)
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Old 12-20-21, 07:24 AM
  #43  
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Riding old bikes with old equipment.

That makes a lot of sense to folks like us but not to most people.
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Old 12-20-21, 07:27 AM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by SJX426 View Post
I will be flamed by some but I insist on the right brake lever cabled to the front brake. For me it is practical as I have used my right hand for the front since I can remember. Since it is practical, I guess it should be mentioned!
I was told by a very experienced bike mechanic that this is how brake cables are routed in Europe (or at least used to be), and also the preferred method for cyclocross bikes. Can anyone confirm these assertions?
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Old 12-20-21, 07:31 AM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by gugie View Post
Tire label orientation at the valve stem is very practical. Many a time I've had a flat tire and couldn't initially find the culprit. Finding where the hole is in the tube, and referencing the location on the tire relative to the tire label has allowed me to focus my attention and find the tiny bit of glass, or metal wire that caused the flat. Without that knowledge it can be like finding a needle in a haystack.
This. Gives me a point of reference for the culprit-search. I've used it many times.
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Old 12-20-21, 07:38 AM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
Riding old bikes with old equipment.

That makes a lot of sense to folks like us but not to most people.
Yep.

If practicality was the driving force, we all might be riding something like the Denny.


But really, it just doesn't get the blood pumping like these do (at least for this guy):

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Old 12-20-21, 07:39 AM
  #47  
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What's the practical purpose of having the brake cables above the stem and bars, rather than below? Whenever I have the LBS do work for me, they do it below, and I always change it back to above, because "tradition." Practically speaking, they seem more out of the way if they are below, at least to me.
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Old 12-20-21, 07:48 AM
  #48  
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Wearing pro team clothing. That is one huge scam. It costs more than standard cycling clothing and the premium goes straight back to those sponsors. Basically, the sponsors are getting you to pay them, for the privilege of advertising for them. Isn't it supposed to be the other way around?
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Old 12-20-21, 08:05 AM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by Spaghetti Legs View Post
,,,Roger Musson insists on the hub label, valve hole trick and even though he comes across as a bit of a crank in his book, I do what I’m told....
I still think of Roger's "The Professional Guide to Wheel Building" as a masterpiece.
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Old 12-20-21, 08:42 AM
  #50  
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Originally Posted by johnnyace View Post
I was told by a very experienced bike mechanic that this is how brake cables are routed in Europe (or at least used to be), and also the preferred method for cyclocross bikes. Can anyone confirm these assertions?
Yes for cyclocross,, so you can operate the rear brake while dismounting over the NDS. That being said, the old saying goes if you’re using your brakes in a cross race you’re not trying to win.
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