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Clunker 100 Challenge #8

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Clunker 100 Challenge #8

Old 07-18-22, 02:34 PM
  #451  
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Originally Posted by ramones71 View Post
...and I have less than a week to do my miles.
I realized yesterday that we were down to the final week, and I was still sitting on 80 km.

I rode my clunker to work today. I'll hit 100 km on the way home. Final pics and wrapup report to follow.
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Old 07-18-22, 03:38 PM
  #452  
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Originally Posted by Andy_K View Post
I realized yesterday that we were down to the final week, and I was still sitting on 80 km.

I rode my clunker to work today. I'll hit 100 km on the way home. Final pics and wrapup report to follow.
I realized I am going to fail again to meet the deadline. Life happens. At least retirement SHOULD make my summer freeeeee next year.

I still intend on finishing 100km for this one and last year's two if it kills me.

Who knows, maybe I will find the gumption to finish...
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Old 07-18-22, 04:57 PM
  #453  
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Originally Posted by jdawginsc View Post
I realized I am going to fail again to meet the deadline. Life happens. At least retirement SHOULD make my summer freeeeee next year.

I still intend on finishing 100km for this one and last year's two if it kills me.

Who knows, maybe I will find the gumption to finish...

Thanks for the reminder. Turns out that I'm likely NOT going to complete adding the "Bumblebee" stencil to the rear fender, so I should summarize before the deadline passes. It would have been a great touch, but this is a "new trick" for me - which would mean a bunch of trial and error where I can't justify spending the time given to my wife's return from a seven-month caregiving mission and a whole new priority list.

Original bicycle: $76.50
Wheels, brake and cable & guides from a 1970-ish Raleigh Sports $20.00
Scrap metal rebate for the stripped frame (which I couldn't give away) -$3.50
Tires: $9.90
Fender stay braces fabricated from steel sheeting: $0.90
Fender stay connectors: $0.35
Washer/front brake stop: $0.59
Brake adjuster barrel (one from a lot of 50) $0.14
Fenders, grip shifter, saddles shift indicator chain and anchor: $0.00
Labor and ingenuity: $0.00
Total $105.88

Bumblebee was ridden a total of 101 miles and change. I genuinely enjoyed the challenges posed by taking a 75+ year old bicycle that originally came as a single-speed coaster brake run-about, upgrading it to a 3-speed with a front brake, and adding a bit of pizzazz by giving it accenting mud guards. Once again - huge thanks to cudak88 for several of the items that were crucial to making this feasible.

and the image that most resonates with me from the entire endeavor:


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Old 07-18-22, 06:23 PM
  #454  
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5 more days or thereabouts.
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Old 07-18-22, 10:37 PM
  #455  
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OK, as previously claimed, I'm finished. With the post-work commute I'm now officially at 104 km. For this morning's ride, I stopped off at the local KP medical center for a vaccine booster. When I was leaving, one of the staff members said he was admiring my bike and that he was jealous. It's nice to hear that about a clunker. Here's my final pic in Challenge form.



And, to refresh the judge's memory, here's the "before" picture.



Initial purchase: $60
Paint and primer: $18
Water bottle braze-on hardware: $5
SunTour 7 front derailleur: $5
Bar tape: $8
Cables: $5

Total: $101
Distance ridden: 104 km

Now, having completed the challenge, I'll apply the $20 decals I got from lettering.com that didn't fit in the budget.
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Old 07-19-22, 01:06 AM
  #456  
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Built up some bikes and put the distance on, but with the deadline approaching Saturday I'd better get to posting. I'll retrofit in the photos when I reach 10 posts.

Entering into the 'greatest height differential between intended rider and current Clunkist' category, we've got a 1982 Venture Invader junior road bike.


Close to as found. A little cleanup and a few things removed.

Entry fee was $20. It's 46cm, so for somebody maybe about 5 ft. I'm a foot taller than that and ride 58cm bikes.

Heavy, cheap, most every part rusted. The 24" 540 tires are toast, the steel rims have deep pitting.

Conveniently, since I don't have the two prong Suntour tool, the freewheel is so rusted that it comes off with just a chain whip.

I'd figured I'd be replacing wheels anyway, but the 540 rim size is a concern at first - I thought I'd be converting 520 -> 504 and gaining tire clearance. Fortunately the bike uses long reach brakes with a slack headtube angle, and a 26" x 1.5" tire fits without toe overlap. I've got a set of wheels and tires fished out of the recycling ready perfect for it (+$0!).



Looks like it has potential to be a cool little bike with 26" slicks on. I start out with a pair of ambitious and conflicting goals that won't quite be reached during the challenge:
  • goal 1: turn this thing into a proper little bike that's easy to learn to work on. Not 'nice' but functional, minimizing weird gotchas that distract from understanding how stuff works. It should fit bottle cages and a rack. It should fit standard parts that swap right out.
    • goal 2: simultaneously, do everything in the hackiest way possible. Improvise tools for no good reason, experiment with bad ideas, rebuild stuff it makes no sense to rebuild, spend no money - embrace the true Clunker spirit.


I work in education and projects outside my comfort zone are useful to stay grounded. It's not the feeling for triumph in solving a problem I'm looking for this time, but the frustration, hesitation and uncertainty, the wasted time on stuff that won't work out, the instant-regret decisions that make it harder, and to sit with all that while trying to chart the path through. I spend a lot of time teaching mechanics as a co-op volunteer too and it's easy to forget that not everyone starts out having a good time when they first come round to those places. If it's frustration I'm after, this is a great bike for it - so here we go!


The 'downside' to my recycled rear wheel is that it's a freehub, and I don't get to see how far that old freewheel can go before cracking in half. Maybe on next year's clunker. It goes through rounds of rust remover and scraping for a few days anyway before eventually the cogs and locking cone come off, then into the miscellaneous pile awaiting the next misadventure.


I don't have the 16mm bottom bracket wrench and don't want to go into town to wreck the co-op's tool on a junk part, so I take off the left side with a hammer and punch.

The right's more stuck, and gets soaked in penetrating oil. With the spindle out, I can clamp an adjustable wrench to the fixed cup with a bolt & washers and hit that with the hammer, and as long as it's tight enough to not twist it works pretty well! I didn't succeed with the Sheldon Brown method of effectively locking a bolt to the cup. The approach that worked is like a trash heap version of the excellent Hozan tool.

Spend a while cleaning up the threads and then try to fit some cartridge bottom brackets (out of the recycling & rebuilt - +$0!) that just won't go for a while before I figure out what the problem is. The tubes weren't mitered well and stick out into the shell, bumping into the bottom bracket's centre sleeve. Filed the tube extensions down a bit and now a cartridge goes in.


Made me realize that I've probably seen the issue before on a bike someone else had built where the bottom bracket ended up tilted. The older Shimano UN26 and especially UN51 are compact and don't seem fussy about this, but the other brands and new Shimano UN300 that use standard industrial bearings run out of room.

Tucked away in the 'is this even useful to know...?' pile of information: a standard BSC cup will fit over the center sleeve of the discontinued UN26/UN51/.. style bottom brackets. All the other cartridge units I've seen have a larger outer sleeve.

This bike (like some other cheap bike boom models) has a 70mm BSC thread shell and ran the wider-shoulder 5S spindle, for a shell-end-to-right of about 29.5mm. A D-EL 127.5 bottom bracket has the same SER, so that keeps the chainline the same. Didn't do quite a good enough job fixing the tube mitering and the left cup won't fully seat, so I'll have to take this apart again and may face the shell, but not until after the challenge.

After a few days of testing rust remover on the old wheels and steel handlebars I give up on them entirely. The bars get replaced with another set of steel drops I've been meaning to get rid of. We've got wheels, cranks, and handlebars now, making this heavy lump of steel look an awful lot like a bike!

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Old 07-19-22, 01:49 AM
  #457  
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Probably far too late for this advice, but never drill out crank cotter pins. If, like most normal people, you don't have access to a cotter press, support the back side of the crank arm and drive the cotter out. An experienced mechanic can usually get them out in good enough shape to use them again, and those don't look bad at all in the pic. If the threaded portion mushrooms out before the pin moves, you can break the threaded part off by driving it back and forth, then drive the tapered part out with an appropriately sized drift. The key is to support the crank arm so the blows are not being absorbed through the bearings (and likely ruining them.)
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Old 07-19-22, 05:17 PM
  #458  
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Getting the tiny Venture Invader ready for its first test ride, I need at least a front brake. The original non-aero levers have poor leverage and they've gotta go. I grab a set of Dia Compe Vx levers out of the stash (recycling bin - $0!). They've got the shortest pivot distance I've measured on anything at 17.5mm, so at first I figure that'll be nice for small hands. But there's more to it than leverage for junior levers, and I don't notice the obvious problem until near the end of the challenge. They'll have to get changed again.

The Vx levers need a weird little ferrule that I don't have, but the ferrules taken from the non-aero levers sorta fit and they stop the housing from pulling through the brake.


The old brake reach is too long. Swapped for a set of Dia Compe sidepulls (off my first adult bike, damaged and dismantled - counting +$5 for the set at co-op pricing). I think a little about going overboard with these - weaken the spring bend to work better with sprung levers? upgrade to Silly Little Retrofits braking with nylon bushings and spring liners? - but don't get to this. Maybe post-challenge.

The frame gets respaced to 135mm, clamping the frame in a bench vice by the old bottom bracket cups and using the string test for alignment.



The rear tire is a Panaracer Pasela without much wear but a slash through the tread.

It gets a boot made from ripping apart the layers of a worn out Gravelking (and a more permanent fix later). I'm able to reuse one of the tubes from the bike, and put the latest of 7ish patches on a punctured tube (counting the cost of the latest patch - +$.50).

Pedals are a plastic platform set (out of the recycling bin - +$0) that'll work nicely. The rear wheel gets 7 loose cogs and a bunch of spacers (dismantled cassettes from recycling - +$0). The chain comes off my main bike freshly worn past the .75 mark (let's call this 1/4 of new, +$4). The stem shifters that came with the bike are missing part of the mounting plate, so I use the single speed trick of running a cable just through the derailer to put it in low gear.

The first test ride is terrifying. Even in low gear it gets going pretty fast and I'm balancing way up above the seatpost, and the saddle is too uncomfortable to sit for long. The headset is severely pitted (both the crown race and the cups) and it's all the more unnerving for it. Round trip is less than 2km and my plan turns to trying to do about that distance every day of the challenge.



After the first ride we're at $29.50 and 2km.

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Old 07-20-22, 08:28 AM
  #459  
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Just a short comment conceding I'm unable to finish this years challenge. Stopped at 51.4 miles/92.6 kilometers after my Sunday June 26th Clunker ride due to a crash 7/3. Cracked ribs are healing, but still painful. Doctor says I may ride again end of August. Frustrating, as we sold our home July 4th. Have til 9/1/22 for pack and move, but depending on my 2 sons for everything I would normally be doing, since can't find any odd job/handyman types locally and Portland/Salem guys won't service our rural area. Don
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Old 07-20-22, 03:12 PM
  #460  
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Ride #2 in the books: 20 miles, bringing my total up to 54 miles. A windy, lazy, uneventful ride. Bike is holding up perfectly, shifting is a little wonky, even with cable adjustment, probably due to a drivetrain made up of a melange of campy components from different eras, at least to my untrained eye. I will not dig into it now, as I only have time to do the miles. I will research it in full after the challenge.



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Old 07-20-22, 08:40 PM
  #461  
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Originally Posted by ollo_ollo View Post
Just a short comment conceding I'm unable to finish this years challenge. Stopped at 51.4 miles/92.6 kilometers after my Sunday June 26th Clunker ride due to a crash 7/3. Cracked ribs are healing, but still painful. Doctor says I may ride again end of August. Frustrating, as we sold our home July 4th. Have til 9/1/22 for pack and move, but depending on my 2 sons for everything I would normally be doing, since can't find any odd job/handyman types locally and Portland/Salem guys won't service our rural area. Don
Life happens. It happened with me two summers in a row unfortunately. At the moment, my mothers house is being rehabbed but me alone. she had to relocate to an assisted living facility.

Key thing is to take time to heal properly. And self care.

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Old 07-21-22, 12:46 AM
  #462  
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Sorry to hear about your crash ollo_ollo, wishing you a speedy recovery and a low stress move.


By the second or third test ride on the Invader I realize that I've got an old gel saddle cover. That makes it possible to do a ride that's about 5km. (I certainly didn't pay money for the thing and don't know why I kept it, but now I'm glad I did - +$0)

The headset gets replaced (+$5 from the local co-op), and I take the opportunity to try using a threaded fork as a headset press. It gets rigged up with some cartridge bearings and the old top cup with big wrench flats turned upside down. Works great. I can't find the extra large adjustable wrench to turn the cup, so I say 'whatever' and use vice grips as the cherry on top of the kludge sundae.



With the bigger wheel and slack headtube there's some noticeable wheel flop at very low speeds but after this point the bike handles pretty good. I'd worried that the handling wouldn't be good enough to eventually give this thing away.

I figure the bike will be easier to control if I can pedal the whole time so I add a temporary set of Shimano Fingertip downtube shifters with retroacting spring. These came off my 1974 CCM Mistral (coulda been a 2018 challenge entry) and I got that bike for free, but I might have paid for the replacements so let's call it +$5 at co-op prices. The spring action doesn't seem to pair well with shifters other than the Shimano Light Action - maybe I'm missing something I could do - and the stem shifters will go back on later, but I'd be likely to hit them with my knees on this tiny bike so they stay off for the challenge.

With rear shifting I do a couple rides around 10km. It starts to be kinda fun.



I take different routes from usual and look at different stuff, winding around spots where there's no real attraction but let me put distance on without getting too far from home. The feeling that something could go wrong where I'd be in for a long awkward walk is a little like first starting to ride real distance before having too much gear or know-how.



After a bit of that I set up the front shifter and put on some rides of about 20km. They're exhausting in a good way on days where I can't fit a long ride, like running sprints without having to run.


The front derailer is a Suntour Spirt top normal and it's gotta go - I hate top normal front, and it's got a big groove worn in the side plate that jams the chain trying to shift, no condition to pass along. I thought the shift logic of pulling both shifters to go to low gear might be nice for a new rider, but it ain't worth it.
The rear Suntour Honor friction shifts well, but the thicker cage design doesn't leave quite enough spoke clearance in low gear to be comfortable, so I think both derailers will get post-challenge replacement.

For a while I'm thinking that I should rig up the world's worst indexing system - drilling a plate to locate a tiny ball bearing, with none of the precision of the wave washers in the real deal - but since this bike is a 1982, I'm not yet at the year of 'doesn't click, doesn't clunk'. I did find a dual cable Positron derailer in the recycling recently and look forward to making that work as bad as new sometime.

We're at $39.50 CAD, with plenty of room in the budget for ride improvements, but I don't end up taking advantage. Why not grab a longer seatpost from the co-op at least? Or swap the saddle? Too busy coming up with bad ideas to try the good ones.

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Old 07-21-22, 04:13 PM
  #463  
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At last, freed from the tyrany of the $108 budget (since I completed my miles within the parameters of the challenge), here is an update on my Centurion with decals from lettering.com applied.



I like decals.

I put the blue water bottle cages on there kind of as a joke because I didn't have anything better available, but they've really kind of grown on me.
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Old 07-21-22, 08:13 PM
  #464  
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Originally Posted by Andy_K View Post
At last, freed from the tyrany of the $108 budget (since I completed my miles within the parameters of the challenge), here is an update on my Centurion with decals from lettering.com applied.



I like decals.

I put the blue water bottle cages on there kind of as a joke because I didn't have anything better available, but they've really kind of grown on me.
Haha.

Firstly, the cages are cool...do a blue lug line or paint the head tube panel to match!

Decals look good. I don't prefer decals, which is why Trixie Trek will never get any! I like the mystery.
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Old 07-21-22, 11:54 PM
  #465  
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Originally Posted by jdawginsc View Post
Haha.

Firstly, the cages are cool...do a blue lug line or paint the head tube panel to match!

Decals look good. I don't prefer decals, which is why Trixie Trek will never get any! I like the mystery.
Oh, thanks for the reminder. I totally forgot that I was going to try my hand at lug lining on this bike. Silver, though, not blue.

I know there's a good chance the next owner of this bike won't like the decals either, so I wrote on the steerer what it is.
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Old 07-22-22, 05:05 AM
  #466  
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Made some progress on the Raleigh hybrid single speed conversion build.

It originally had a set of Shimano BioPace cranks with a triple chainring. I'm not using those, and am swapping them out for a set of Shimano 600ex arabesque cranks.

HOWEVER...

The bottom bracket spindle is the wrong length (too long on drive side) and my chainline will be too crooked to be reliable.

And the spindle is totally roached. The drive side bearing race is all chewed up. Because the drive side bearings only exist as stabby bits of shrapnel.

Surprisingly i don't have any more looseball bottom brackets in my pile of parts so the drive side bb cup needs to come out so it can be replaced by a cheap cartridge unit.

But it is stuck haaaaaaaaaaard. And the flats on it are too thin for me to effectively get my bigger wrenches on it.

Sheldon Brown's website has a guide for just this.

I ended up buying a 5/8-inch 18 TPI hex bolt 1 1/2inches long, with a nut, a big flat washer, and four lockwashers. Bolt and lockwashers go inside the bb shell, threaded part of bolt sticks out thru the fixed cup, flat washer and nut go on outside.

Since it is an English threaded bb, tightening the nut will clamp down on the fixed cup and eventually break it loose.

Good thing I got it out, the bearing races in the fixed cup were all chewed up too. I'm guessing someone put the bearing cage in backwards and then rode it for several years.

So now I need to figure out which cartridge bottom bracket to get that will result in a reasonable chainline.

I have a 39t chainring for the cranks I'm thinking of using but may pick up a different one.

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Old 07-22-22, 10:35 AM
  #467  
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35 miles today on the Serotta. No issues at all. The tires on this bike are making me re-think my tire consumption. The old Contis are hanging in there.



I often throw down the money to put new rubber on a bike before I ever ride it, mostly for looks, and partly so I will know everything is ready to go from the start. Im now sure that Ive never ridden a tire to its complete lifespan and I need to change my wasteful ways!
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Old 07-22-22, 02:28 PM
  #468  
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As last follow up before this challenge ends the Motive Stone Grinder is working great as a cargo bike turns out with the slightly heavier weight and good balance it works nice for slightly heavy loads for a bike. Used it to haul some stuff plants to the library today on gravel trail and it did great.





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Old 07-22-22, 02:40 PM
  #469  
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Originally Posted by ollo_ollo View Post
Just a short comment conceding I'm unable to finish this years challenge. Stopped at 51.4 miles/92.6 kilometers after my Sunday June 26th Clunker ride due to a crash 7/3. Cracked ribs are healing, but still painful. Doctor says I may ride again end of August. Frustrating, as we sold our home July 4th. Have til 9/1/22 for pack and move, but depending on my 2 sons for everything I would normally be doing, since can't find any odd job/handyman types locally and Portland/Salem guys won't service our rural area. Don
I'm awarding bonus mileage of 7.5km
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Old 07-22-22, 03:48 PM
  #470  
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Originally Posted by Narhay View Post
I'm awarding bonus mileage of 7.5km
I can donate my 5.8 miles since I wont be finishing on time...again...
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Old 07-22-22, 04:10 PM
  #471  
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Originally Posted by zukahn1 View Post
As last follow up before this challenge ends the Motive Stone Grinder is working great as a cargo bike turns out with the slightly heavier weight and good balance it works nice for slightly heavy loads for a bike. Used it to haul some stuff plants to the library today on gravel trail and it did great.


One of the coolest looking clunkers of the year in my ****** opinion.
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Old 07-22-22, 11:54 PM
  #472  
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Last report on the Venture Invader before I write up the couple other clunkers tomorrow.

Got another booster shot yesterday and not enough sleep, feeling like a wreck. It'll be gone tomorrow and well worth it. Doing basic stuff was a struggle of fumbling things everywhere, which makes this a perfect day to talk about sewing up a tire!

I take a crack at sewing something once every couple years and it hasn't ever gone all that well, as though I've suddenly got no experience working with my hands and can't find the dexterity. I don't have the knowledge of technique to come up with any useful tools to make things easier the way I can with bike mechanics. Kinda like the experience of learning mechanics and coming up against that 'do I even know left from right anymore...?' bit of 3D visualization as things are turned while flipped around.

There's lots of inexpensive quality materials that you can use to make a sewed-in tire boot, good adhesive and tapes, durable and stretchy thread like nylon. or! you can have a little fun ripping up the bead of a used Gravelking for the kevlar thread, and peel apart layers of the tire to get a nice thin piece of rubber that won't dig into the tube. You can do a bunch of work for materials that aren't as good or easy to use as stuff available most anywhere. So that's the way I did it.

I find some good ideas for the sewing part, and automotive tire video where the guy makes a little loop on the inside with an awl and pulls thread through that loop, so the stitch is almost all inside the tire. I mess around trying to find something to use as an awl and fail, then just start stitching, then get the idea of doing short outside stitches within the grooves of the tread where they won't contact the road as much.


Beautiful. Right up there with all my other fine needlework. (I'll put some shoe goo over this and sew through the boot too when I use the tire again.)

Cleaned up the inside, glued the boot in with rubber cement, clamped in a vice overnight, and later I'll probably do a few more stitches through the boot. The tire got through the challenge with just the boot, figure this extra will be fine. I'll reuse this tire on a bike of my own to see how it holds up.

Lots of big ideas I didn't get around to:
  • No bottle cages yet! There's a right angle drill with a seized chuck for cheap that I'll grab to fix and put in some rivnuts.
  • I need a little extra clearance at the fork crown to run a 1.5" tire. This is partly a mitering issue as with the bottom bracket, but I don't want to remove material from the fork. I found an excellent suggestion from FBinNY to space it out with a ball bearing and use automotive body filler to make a flat surface. I borrowed some filler from my sister-in-law over a month ago that I should use & return. I did all the riding with the wheel clamped in the dropouts and nothing taking up that extra space to see if it'd move at all, no issues.
  • Not a major issue, but a major fix: the dimpling on the chainstays lines up perfectly with the tire without a claw hanger, and then with the claw it's less roomy than I'd like. Then again, there's a broken spoke on the rear wheel that I keep forgetting about as it is. It's a 36 spoke rim holding quite true.
    • Been trying to think of hack fixes here - of course brazing on a hanger is the right thing to do, but I can't braze. Processing scrap frames at the co-op gets me thinking about modifying dropouts cut from another frame to somehow clamp on as a no-weld fix. Would take a great deal of grinding and fitting, but serve the dual purpose of spacing things out to run normal length quick release axles. It'd be a nice-to-have on my CCM Mistral too. If I ever come up with a decent idea on it I'll post here. Happy to hear suggestions!
  • I'll need get or make some proper aero junior levers. Those Dia Compe Vxs have high leverage, but some of the worst fit for small hands with super long reach. There's some posts by puchfinnland on here that may help.
Then the simple stuff I just plain don't get to:
  • Never bothered setting up a rear brake knowing I'd need to change levers.
  • Didn't put those stem shifters back on.
  • Didn't wrap the bars! Hummed and hawed about colour and how to do something free, the levers, etc., no complete complete photos for me.
  • Didn't ride the the last 0.6km. I was going to do this with tape and both brakes to finish things off. This weekend I have other stuff to do, so I'm resisting that completionist impulse and calling this...
challenge incomplete! Our running cost is $39.50 and we're at 99.4km.

Ultimately I got distracted and lost my resolve to do things the hard way, building up two other clunkers I could ride for real. I'll keep at the other stuff off and on so I can eventually give this bike away to someone keen on it. The truly hacky stuff will be de-hacked. In addition to shortest bike I hope for a runaway win in the hotly contested Incomplete Challenge - Shortest from Finish Line category. Perhaps also in I've Learned My Lesson - 1000 Words Ain't No Photo for starting so late with not enough posts.


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Old 07-23-22, 02:15 AM
  #473  
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Another Clunker Pug Build

I need another bike like a hole in the head...

I think I say that every year, and here we are again! I decided when I viewed @Andy_K 's PX-10 build that I "need" to have a French bike, at least to hang all of my French parts collected over the years (as they were previously relegated to a very crappy and small French bike that I had bought as least desirable one of four bikes for C$100 that I picked up a few years ago to obtain a bike for my younger son). Henceforth, this black rattlecan victim will be known as the "donor bike" which I am valuing at C$25, and yes I am going with "steel is real, right down to the wheels" this year.


After scouring the ads in Vancouver for a good French bike I was unwilling to take anything that was on offer until a 23" Peugeot U-08 frame appeared for C$20. I confirmed with the seller's exhortation that it was straight and not dented and we were off and (soon to be) rolling!

So the plan is to transplant the components from the donor bike to the Pug. However, the fork from the donor bike does not have a long enough steerer for the larger Pug frame, which led me to go through my box of French parts to find a fork from an old Gitane with a perfectly sized steerer, but unfortunately the steerer on that fork is bent, and straightening the steerer (bent at the middle of the steerer tube and not in the direction of a front end collision, which puzzles me a little) is a task I will have to leave for a later revision. For now, I was able to find an old fork with a lot of rake (increases wheelbase from what a friends Peugeot U-08 of the same era by about 10mm) with a good steerer length that I picked up at the Co-op for C$5 because an old Raleigh Superbe I was working on is missing one of its "thimbles". I noted that it already had indication of how many kilometers I needed to ride to complete the challenge!

So we are at C$50 for frame, fork, 27" steel wheels (including near disposal tires and tubes), Mafac racer brakes, Simplex plastic shifters, Huret FD, very well-used Perjohn saddle, genuine Ventolux frame pump and various cable stops, etc. What I had added since the purchase of the donor bike were: Grand Compe 115mm stem (US$10, thanks Bellingham bike co-op, and it allowed the AVA suicide stem to be added to my rogue's gallary of terrible French parts), TA BB cups with Stronglight square taper axle (C$3). Additions to the Pug build were a TA square taper 48-36 crankset that was on a Japanese-built Schwinn World Voyageur that I bought for C$40 that I removed to add a triple crankset and I am valuing this crankset at C$10 for this build, and long-cage a Sachs Huret New Success RD that I bought from the co-op for C$15, along with French bar-end plugs (C$3). The only additions bought to complete this build were: a steel 25.2mm seatpost (Pug was even narrower than the donor bike seat tube), a used chain (C$3), a used Suntour 14-32 6-speed freewheel (C$3) (the French wheels were NOT French threaded), and used platform pedals (C$5). I used recycled bar tape, housings and cables (actually pulled from the garbage and recycling bins - $0).

I add the gratuitous cone with RD shot (TM @Lascauxcaveman) - I always order black licorice because it is the only flavour that blends with bike grease!


Total costs:

Frame C$20
Donor bike C$25 (wheels, tires, saddle and clamp, shifters, FD, brakes, handlebars, pump)
Fork C$5
Stem US$10
Plugs C$3)
BB C$3
Crankset C$10
RD C$15
Seatpost C$3
Chain C$3
Freewheel C$3
Pedals C$5
Total C$95+US$10 (perilously close to the line, but saved by the annual escalation and the vicissitudes of international finance)

After a very short shakeout ride I found out that the Huret FD was assembled with screws that were threatening to come out and was so loose that it could not shift, that those Huret wing-nuts on the front wheel are probably the source of the eponymous epithet, and steel rims are still as bad I as I remembered. With all three of these "challenges" resolved with tightening on Bastille Day I started on a long ride to complete the challenge and finished the day with 136km ridden. I intended to take photos and mark the remaining distances on the front fork but my camera failed me near the halfway point:











POST CLUNKER CHALLENGE RIDING

None of the bikes in my stable are passengers, so the Pug had to bear the indignity of dragging the trailer with the stryrofoam recycling to the drop-off


You may have noted that having completed this year's challenge I modified the Pug to suit my current needs: another long-haul touring bike, because despite their weight and 50 years of riding, the Peugeot frames are lovely smooth riders.

I replaced the claw on the RD to one that was 6mm longer, making the RD able to handle the 32T lowest gear (the initial 136km ride was without access to my lowest gear) - additional cost C$2
I replaced the steel wheels with some vintage aluminum rim wheels: 700C in the rear, but kept with a 27" front wheel because the brake reach was already at maximum - additional cost about C$40 (eventually with the Gitane fork, I will likely go to a 700C wheel on the front, allowing easier tire options). Now that my tube valves are presta the frame pump is purely ornamental.
I added aluminum fenders, a rack on the back, bottle cages on the down tube and handlebars, and low-riders on the front - additional costs C$10+C$6+C$4+C$6 (along with my Kirtland Tour Pak handlebar bag)

While now somewhat above the clunker threshold, the Pug earned its first tour, a 4-day 400km ride from Vancouver to Hornby Island via Saysutshun, including a 160km final day ride back. While not faltering on the task the Pug demonstrated in Gallic nature by having its drive-side bottom bracket cup come loose just as I was getting home. I am hoping that this will be remedied with some thread locker and greater tightening force!



The final "upgrade" will be to find an aluminum seatpost (at least so it will not slip and require the hose clamp) and replace the very worn Perjohn saddle with a still ancient Nervex saddle that appears to have many more miles remaining. I welcome references to good posts on recovering a dried leather saddle.
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Old 07-23-22, 08:27 AM
  #474  
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Originally Posted by Narhay View Post
I'm awarding bonus mileage of 7.5km
Due poor math skills, my concession comment had an error!. Correct total is 82.7 kilometers. So despite generous help from @Narhay and @jdawginsc (a fine pair of fellow c&v'rs) my total is: 82.7 km + 7.5 km from Narhay + 9.3 km from jdawginsc = 99.5 km. Just wasn't meant to be this year. Don

Last edited by ollo_ollo; 07-23-22 at 08:42 AM. Reason: correct to jdawginsc
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Old 07-23-22, 12:37 PM
  #475  
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Originally Posted by ollo_ollo View Post
Due poor math skills, my concession comment had an error!. Correct total is 82.7 kilometers. So despite generous help from @Narhay and @jdawginsc (a fine pair of fellow c&v'rs) my total is: 82.7 km + 7.5 km from Narhay + 9.3 km from jdawginsc = 99.5 km. Just wasn't meant to be this year. Don
i will get my buttocks out and ride a few kilometers to get you over the top.
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