Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

The seat forward on old road-bikes thread....

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

The seat forward on old road-bikes thread....

Old 06-04-22, 01:13 PM
  #126  
Hobbiano 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Baton Rouge La
Posts: 1,065
Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 336 Post(s)
Liked 247 Times in 170 Posts
Originally Posted by repechage View Post
On the verge of Troll-Landia
On the verge?
Hobbiano is offline  
Old 06-05-22, 07:14 PM
  #127  
beng1
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 324
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 336 Post(s)
Liked 153 Times in 77 Posts
Originally Posted by chip.hedler View Post
All right, fellow Freds and Friedas, who would your money be on for this matchup? (Apologies to any who might take umbrage, I'm still Cat 5 in the snark competition)
I can be honest about how fast I can go on the Huffy, it is pretty easy for me to cruise along between 19 and 20mph with it in eighth gear. Once I get over 20mph in eight gear I am spinning too fast and I think the efficiency drops for me. The next cog on my 5-speed freewheel is a two-tooth jump and if I spin it up to where I am comfortable it is too fast, I am guessing 23mph, and I can't hold that speed against the wind for more than a few miles before I crash and have to go back down to eighth and recover, so for now I just use ninth when I have a little bit of a downhill or the wind at my back. If I can find a freewheel with an 18-tooth cog it would probably help me a lot, but for now all I can do is spin up the 19-tooth cog or jump onto the 17 a little when it is useful.
beng1 is offline  
Old 06-06-22, 12:41 PM
  #128  
repechage
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 17,539
Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2443 Post(s)
Liked 1,372 Times in 1,031 Posts
Originally Posted by Hobbiano View Post
On the verge?
I was being polite.

be amusing for one to consult a gear development chart and better comprehend "8th" gear.
repechage is offline  
Old 06-06-22, 05:26 PM
  #129  
beng1
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 324
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 336 Post(s)
Liked 153 Times in 77 Posts
Moved the seat forward on the Fuji today and down a bit, it is also sporting some new 1 1/8" tires, so it will be interesting to give it a good ride on the next decent and free day and see how it goes. Took it around the block a few times and it gave a good impression. No matter what I would like to find a stem that will let the bars down another inch or more, the frame being taller than my favorite bike keeps them up higher than I am used to.


beng1 is offline  
Old 06-06-22, 05:43 PM
  #130  
beng1
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 324
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 336 Post(s)
Liked 153 Times in 77 Posts
Originally Posted by 79pmooney View Post
(I learned years ago that slamming a ti railed seat so the clamp is onto the rail curve is a good way to break the rail of a $125 seat mid ride. Me being light and long, flexy railed seats are a real blessing on poor roads.)
Most of the weight on a seat is on the wide part of the seat, that is where your pelvic bones, or sit-bones meet the seat. I certainly do not put any weight on the nose of a seat, because it would be on my genitals and I try to avoid that.

So if you look at the last photo of this thread of how I just moved the Fuji's seat, the most weight is concentrated as close to where the rails are clamped as possible, much closer than if the clamp is centered on the rails, so actually having the seat moved all the way forward as I do so the rails are clamped directly under the wide part of the seat is putting the least stress on the seat rails possible.
beng1 is offline  
Old 06-06-22, 05:53 PM
  #131  
beng1
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 324
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 336 Post(s)
Liked 153 Times in 77 Posts
Originally Posted by chip.hedler View Post
Mathematically, Work = Force x Distance. Not counting rolling resistance and air resistance, traveling at a given steady speed on a dead flat path shouldn't require additional force or be affected by the combined weight of the bike and rider. As soon as you have even slight undulations in road elevation or make even minor adjustments in speed to maintain a given average, weight starts to be involved because the mass needs to be lifted and/or accelerated, requiring additional force (F = m * a). As for the effect of weight on rolling resistance, I'd think that might be a factor, what with the ongoing flexing of tire shape as the wheels revolve, and perhaps increased pressure of the cones, bearings, and bearing races on each other. All these effects might seem so small in magnitude to be trivial, but if you're already working close to your limit overcoming air resistance (the major source of resistance), they could push you past an output level that you could sustain.
Most of the weight of any bike-rider combo is the rider, since I am over 200 pounds the bike is such a small percentage of the total weight package, less than 20%, it makes no difference if it weight 25 pounds or 35 pounds. The only steep acceleration curve in bicycle riding is starting from a dead stop, accelerating from 19mph to 20 or 21mph has such a slow acceleration curve that it would be hard to measure, and the difference dropping ten pounds of bike weight from a total bike/rider combo weighing 250 pounds would be so small it would never be worth worrying about. If I am not worried about riding a 250 pound bike/rider combo in a race, I am sure not going to be worrying about my acceleration at top speeds. As long as the bike is in great shape, the only thing worth worrying about is improving my riding position at speed. The science cycle-coach Dylan Johnson reviews for the public backs this all up.
beng1 is offline  
Old 06-06-22, 06:06 PM
  #132  
beng1
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 324
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 336 Post(s)
Liked 153 Times in 77 Posts
Originally Posted by chip.hedler View Post
It may be that the net force on the pedal for some cyclists during the upstroke may register as a downward vector. But that doesn't negate the benefit to them of exerting an upward pull during that part of the power circle, because you want the least amount of the weight of that leg to be lifted by the downward thrust of the opposite leg. And one-legged pedaling exercises demonstrate that straps or clip-ins do allow you to exert propulsive force on the upstroke.Serious mountain bike competitors will often ride without straps or clip-ins for a number of different reasons, but I'll speculate that many of them go to clip-ins when they road bike. Any mountain bikers out there who want to report your experiences and opinions?
\

The science says that the only real advantage to clips or clipless pedals/shoes, is on extreme acceleration or very steep climbing. For most normal riding there is almost no difference between flat/clips or clipless pedals to mention, this is what scientific research says. So yes, if you are a track racer on a velodrome, or in a mountainbike race on a course with very steep hills, then flat pedals might be a disadvantage, but they will never be a disadvantage for me on my road bikes in the relatively flat time-trials I would enter which are about 12-13 miles long, and they would be a waste for anyone riding any bike on the street unless they live in a town nested in large hills or mountains. My feet are so very comfortable on flat pedals, compared to having clips squeezing them or being in stiff cycling shoes. I love moving my feet around at will when I ride, and being able to wear a variety of comfortable shoes instead of just one pair of expensive cycle shoes. I had Shimano shoes back in the 90s with Time ATAC pedals and I felt they did help on steep climbs with the mountainbike, but not enough to give up all the comforts, convenience and advantages of my selection of normal shoes and flat pedals.
beng1 is offline  
Old 06-06-22, 06:16 PM
  #133  
beng1
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 324
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 336 Post(s)
Liked 153 Times in 77 Posts
Originally Posted by Road Fan View Post
Seems to me the foot tends to stay on the pedal when it is moving synchronized with the path of the pedal. I think this is part of rider skill. The down force should hold the foot on the pedal during the downstroke. I tend to pull back on the backstroke, pointing my toe down to prevent my foot flying off, so a little bit of force there. On the upstroke I'm not sure what I do, because I'm feeling the next downstroke on the other pedal. I tend to lift my knee a bit during TDC to make it smooth before the next thrust, but honestly, this sort of self-training is hard to maintain if you are not a regular, which i am not anymore. Mainly I try to do these things to feel smooth. I guess if I feel smooth it must be better, right (maybe?)?
Whether or not the things a rider does are actually more efficient or not, the rider's comfort physical and mental are very important. I have really been enjoying the science research reviewed by Dylan Johnson in his YouTube videos, and much of the research he reviews says that a lot of the things people debate about bikes, such as crank-length, pedaling technique and some other factors end up being what feels good to the rider or what the rider is used to. In one scientific study top pro bicycle racers showed no increase in performance or power whether they used just the downstroke in pedaling or tried pedaling in circles to put force on the pedals for more of the pedaling cycle. Also crank length does not appear to be worth worrying about beyond what feels good to the rider, and flat pedals do not seem to be a disadvantage in power production in most all riding. So it seems except for seat height, which research does say can affect power significantly, we just don't have to worry about a lot of what our bicycle is or how we ride it.
beng1 is offline  
Old 06-07-22, 06:04 AM
  #134  
smd4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 1,370

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Super Corsa

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 783 Post(s)
Liked 575 Times in 371 Posts
Originally Posted by beng1 View Post
I just moved the Fuji's sea...all the way forward...
So...you did the exact same thing I suggested, on the exact bike, and for which you gave me crap.

Originally Posted by smd4 View Post
Then why don't you push the seat forward on the rails and get an even more aggressive effective seat tube angle?
Originally Posted by beng1 View Post
Why would you assume what would be the optimum seating position for someone on an internet forum ???
smd4 is offline  
Old 06-07-22, 07:35 AM
  #135  
chip.hedler
Member
 
chip.hedler's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2022
Posts: 32

Bikes: 1986 Bianchi Nuovo Alloro, 1961 or 1962 Geminiani Special

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 15 Posts
Well, now--can anyone explain what happened to the recent posts featuring a very colorful, though very small-framed, machine of uncertain provenance? If removed in keeping with unspecified forum guidelines, specific feedback would be helpful in greater future compliance. As would someone stepping up and identifying themselves as the initiator of the decision to expurgate the posts. Part of what is puzzling about the decision is that for the most part in this thread, there has been a hands-off approach to the full range of remarks, whose intent often seems to conflate personality with point of view, nothing extraordinary in forum world. Anyone care to shed some light?
chip.hedler is offline  
Old 06-07-22, 01:44 PM
  #136  
beng1
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 324
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 336 Post(s)
Liked 153 Times in 77 Posts
On May 15th, 2022;

Originally Posted by beng1 View Post
The Fuji is a new bike for me, I am just getting it tuned and set up so it will be tweaked more..
beng1 is offline  
Old 06-07-22, 02:58 PM
  #137  
DMC707
Banned.
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Norman, Oklahoma
Posts: 5,024

Bikes: Too many to list

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1606 Post(s)
Liked 873 Times in 587 Posts
Originally Posted by chip.hedler View Post
Well, now--can anyone explain what happened to the recent posts featuring a very colorful, though very small-framed, machine of uncertain provenance? If removed in keeping with unspecified forum guidelines, specific feedback would be helpful in greater future compliance. As would someone stepping up and identifying themselves as the initiator of the decision to expurgate the posts. Part of what is puzzling about the decision is that for the most part in this thread, there has been a hands-off approach to the full range of remarks, whose intent often seems to conflate personality with point of view, nothing extraordinary in forum world. Anyone care to shed some light?
Interesting. If i were to guess, a moderator may have thought that was straying too far off the beaten path into "Troll-land" as the OP has some unusual cycling philosophies to be sure, but seems well-intentioned

The flip side would be almost any thread by another illustrious forum member, LarrySellerz, where those turn into free-for -alls and its widely speculated that that is Larry's intent

But just guessing - i thought the photoshop of the reversed post on the machine was a masterful touch myself - reminding me of my nephew's little Hoffman i saved from a life in an attic

DMC707 is offline  
Old 06-07-22, 05:40 PM
  #138  
chip.hedler
Member
 
chip.hedler's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2022
Posts: 32

Bikes: 1986 Bianchi Nuovo Alloro, 1961 or 1962 Geminiani Special

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 15 Posts
Maybe the visuals were too far from the middle of the bell-shaped curve for images of classic and vintage bicycles. They, and the various bits of accompanying text, were certainly less pointed than a lot of the remarks passed back and forth. Uh-oh, is this pic of your nephew's Hoffman with the reversed seat post clamp at risk?

I'm new to bikeforums.net so I'm still getting used to the implicit norms and no-nos. But on the face of it, if the OP's motive was simply to engage in dialogue about seat position, why not drop in on the lively, informed exchange of viewpoints in the thread on seat position in the "fitting-your-bike" forum? Not as ripe for provocatively-toned observations?

Last edited by chip.hedler; 06-07-22 at 05:44 PM.
chip.hedler is offline  
Old 06-08-22, 06:24 AM
  #139  
beng1
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 324
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 336 Post(s)
Liked 153 Times in 77 Posts
Took the Fuji out for a ride yesterday to test the seat position. After about ten miles I stopped, got the wrench out and lowered it about 5/8" and then it felt good for the rest of the ride. One thing I did not play with yet is this neat tensioner for the Fuji-branded saddle on this bike;


beng1 is offline  
Old 06-08-22, 07:06 AM
  #140  
Road Fan
Senior Member
 
Road Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 16,135

Bikes: 1980 Masi, 1984 Mondonico, 1984 Trek 610, 1980 Woodrup Giro, 2005 Mondonico Futura Leggera ELOS, 1967 PX10E, 1971 Peugeot UO-8

Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1542 Post(s)
Liked 448 Times in 344 Posts
Originally Posted by beng1 View Post
Whether or not the things a rider does are actually more efficient or not, the rider's comfort physical and mental are very important. I have really been enjoying the science research reviewed by Dylan Johnson in his YouTube videos, and much of the research he reviews says that a lot of the things people debate about bikes, such as crank-length, pedaling technique and some other factors end up being what feels good to the rider or what the rider is used to. In one scientific study top pro bicycle racers showed no increase in performance or power whether they used just the downstroke in pedaling or tried pedaling in circles to put force on the pedals for more of the pedaling cycle. Also crank length does not appear to be worth worrying about beyond what feels good to the rider, and flat pedals do not seem to be a disadvantage in power production in most all riding. So it seems except for seat height, which research does say can affect power significantly, we just don't have to worry about a lot of what our bicycle is or how we ride it.
I love it! Scientific sanity!
Road Fan is offline  
Likes For Road Fan:
Old 06-08-22, 08:14 AM
  #141  
Road Fan
Senior Member
 
Road Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 16,135

Bikes: 1980 Masi, 1984 Mondonico, 1984 Trek 610, 1980 Woodrup Giro, 2005 Mondonico Futura Leggera ELOS, 1967 PX10E, 1971 Peugeot UO-8

Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1542 Post(s)
Liked 448 Times in 344 Posts
Originally Posted by chip.hedler View Post
The flex made for a very comfortable ride--cushioned the shock of routine bumps very nicely--but if someone accelerated off the front and I wanted to stay with them, a portion of my initial burst of energy would be absorbed in the flex, creating a lag in my response. That meant I had to work harder to keep from getting dropped (hard enough for me already!) Over the course of a ride, repeatedly paying that penalty meant less energy in reserve if I wanted to break away. That certainly seems to be the rationale for serious competition frames to be beefier and have more rigid geometry.
Just a small point - I think rigidity is driven as much by frame structure as by geometry such as head and seat angles.
Road Fan is offline  
Likes For Road Fan:
Old 06-08-22, 08:44 AM
  #142  
obrentharris 
Senior Member
 
obrentharris's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Point Reyes Station, California
Posts: 3,897

Bikes: Indeed!

Mentioned: 80 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1158 Post(s)
Liked 2,027 Times in 681 Posts
Originally Posted by repechage View Post
On the verge of Troll-Landia
Verge?
Brent
obrentharris is offline  
Old 06-08-22, 11:35 AM
  #143  
bamboobike4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2022
Posts: 1,009
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 336 Post(s)
Liked 505 Times in 309 Posts
I still miss my Mini-Mac
Originally Posted by beng1 View Post
bamboobike4 is offline  
Likes For bamboobike4:
Old 06-08-22, 11:37 AM
  #144  
bamboobike4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2022
Posts: 1,009
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 336 Post(s)
Liked 505 Times in 309 Posts
Originally Posted by chip.hedler View Post
Well, now--can anyone explain what happened to the recent posts featuring a very colorful, though very small-framed, machine of uncertain provenance? If removed in keeping with unspecified forum guidelines, specific feedback would be helpful in greater future compliance. As would someone stepping up and identifying themselves as the initiator of the decision to expurgate the posts. Part of what is puzzling about the decision is that for the most part in this thread, there has been a hands-off approach to the full range of remarks, whose intent often seems to conflate personality with point of view, nothing extraordinary in forum world. Anyone care to shed some light?
Some people can post just about anything.
Some can't.
Simple as that.
No different than YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, other private sites.
Tongues must stay in the cheeks.
bamboobike4 is offline  
Old 06-09-22, 10:59 AM
  #145  
tomato coupe
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 3,378

Bikes: Colnago, Van Dessel, Factor, Cervelo, Ritchey

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2120 Post(s)
Liked 3,550 Times in 1,447 Posts
Originally Posted by beng1 View Post
I ride without all that garbage every day, no helmet.....
Originally Posted by smd4 View Post
Well, that certainly explains a lot.
Yes, it does.

Originally Posted by beng1
Over the last 55 years of actually riding bicycles, I have crashed a lot and hard ...
tomato coupe is offline  
Likes For tomato coupe:
Old 06-10-22, 10:58 AM
  #146  
DMC707
Banned.
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Norman, Oklahoma
Posts: 5,024

Bikes: Too many to list

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1606 Post(s)
Liked 873 Times in 587 Posts
Originally Posted by bamboobike4 View Post
Tongues must stay in the cheeks.

Like a lesbian orgy !
DMC707 is offline  
Likes For DMC707:
Old 06-10-22, 01:59 PM
  #147  
bbbob
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Posts: 48

Bikes: Bianco porteur

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Liked 36 Times in 17 Posts
you can't (properly) fix rider compartment issues by shoving the seat forward. Same with stems. Bike ergonomics starts with the pelvis to BB situation, combined with ideal crank length to suit your femurs.
This is STATIC. Once you figure "it' out, it translates to all your bikes and is non-negotiable. In addition ALL bikes have an ideal stem length for proper handling and weight placement over the front axle.
This is a "zone" but a SMALL one, maybe 1cm (for example either a 10cm or 11cm on a certain size frame with its front end geometry). So, the top tube has to be the adjustable variable, which it isn't, which explains WHY knowledgable riders are looking for specific top tube lengths to finish the equation. All the rest is compromise, perhaps satisfactory compromise, but still less than ideal.
bbbob is offline  
Likes For bbbob:
Old 06-10-22, 02:24 PM
  #148  
bamboobike4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2022
Posts: 1,009
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 336 Post(s)
Liked 505 Times in 309 Posts
Originally Posted by bbbob View Post
You can't (properly) fix rider compartment issues by shoving the seat forward. Same with stems. Bike ergonomics starts with the pelvis to BB situation, combined with ideal crank length to suit your femurs. This is STATIC.
Unless your bike shop has bikes that they think you'll buy, regardless of fit. The experts expect my money!

Originally Posted by bbbob View Post
Once you figure "it' out, it translates to all your bikes and is non-negotiable.
Sorry, but already having 17 bikes that don't fit is part of the negotiations! So is my pain threshold, unfortunately, but I completely understand.

Originally Posted by bbbob View Post
In addition ALL bikes have an ideal stem length for proper handling and weight placement over the front axle. This is a "zone" but a SMALL one, maybe 1cm (for example either a 10cm or 11cm on a certain size frame with its front end geometry)
Well, "ideal" is one way of putting it. What we can "make do with" kind of equates to "ideal" until we experience different.

Originally Posted by bbbob View Post
So, the top tube has to be the adjustable variable, which it isn't, which explains WHY knowledgeable riders are looking for specific top tube lengths to finish the equation.
There are plenty of "knowledgeable" riders who are riding just fine on bikes that they've fitted via trial and error, the fit of which are not "ideal," but they manage to ride thousands of miles in ignorance. (That is a ride-on sentence).

Originally Posted by bbbob View Post
All the rest is compromise, perhaps satisfactory compromise, but still less than ideal.
There's the catch-all. Satisfactory compromise is a lost art in much of our lives these days. If only my ex....

I agree with a lot of what you said, but the absolutism is debatable and will always be, because humans are notoriously independent and stubborn, adaptable and face it, blissfully ignorant.
If the bike is pretty enough, or rare, or has that crankset you just think is cool, or if the chicks dig it, or if it was your high school bike, or grandpa's Hour record bike, you know, we stray.

Thanks for putting it well, though. The idea of proper fit is being narrowed a bit, between theories and approaches, and hopefully, it all goes forward.

Last edited by bamboobike4; 06-10-22 at 09:22 PM.
bamboobike4 is offline  
Likes For bamboobike4:
Old 06-10-22, 03:40 PM
  #149  
bbbob
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Posts: 48

Bikes: Bianco porteur

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Liked 36 Times in 17 Posts
Just trying to help folks feel better and perform better/longer, and understand why. Yes, it's more than understandable that people ride what they have or love, which isn't always ergo-perfect.
My comments are perhaps more relevant for future purchases, as in the hunt one can be picky, as after the fact doesn't apply. Once you have your numbers straight, you begin to notice how certain brands have shorter or longer top tubes, thus helping narrow things down. Crank arm length (assuming one has choices) is a significant aspect. many are riding something other than what suits their femurs.

Being tall myself, I struggle to find vintage crank arms in 175mm. So I ain't sayin' it's easy !
bbbob is offline  
Likes For bbbob:
Old 06-10-22, 06:14 PM
  #150  
chip.hedler
Member
 
chip.hedler's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2022
Posts: 32

Bikes: 1986 Bianchi Nuovo Alloro, 1961 or 1962 Geminiani Special

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by SurferRosa View Post
Here's Ernesto Colnago in a screen shot from the very end of that video, after explaining how critical it was to make Eddy Merckx's bike as light as possible for him to break the hour record:

and here's a video clip from Oliver Bridgewood, an amateur who came close to breaking Merckx's 1972 record:
https://neoincunabula.org/video/hour...pt_960x540.mp4
Every one of the micro-breaks during, say, a normal time trial, that Oliver mentions affect one's final performance. What recommendations about equipment and technique would either of these riders make?

Last edited by chip.hedler; 06-10-22 at 06:23 PM.
chip.hedler is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.