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brake caliper suggestions?

Old 06-12-22, 06:27 AM
  #51  
MasiMoe
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Originally Posted by C9H13N View Post
I have the original holders with tire guides and the Weinmann “X” pads.
Thank you so much, C9H13N. Good information, I'm going to order a set of them pads.
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Old 06-12-22, 05:20 PM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by C9H13N View Post
I have the original holders with tire guides and the Weinmann “X” pads.
I spent a big chunk of the day today trying various options and in the end went with Clarks X pads in original Weinmann holders. So far seem to work alright, judging by a short test ride. Nowhere close Vainqueur with Kool-Stops, but acceptable. Tomorrow I'll ride that bike to the office, just finished putting it together and need a longer ride to test the brakes and get used to friction shifting again. Next month, when I build a new wheelset, I might look for some Weinmann compatible Kool Stop pads.
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Old 06-14-22, 07:34 AM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
If you're accustomed to the mechanical advantage of dual-pivot calipers, braking with a single-pivot side pull can be disconcerting. Like you, I have no problem stopping my bike with Campagnolo Record side-pulls and their various clones from SunTour, Gran Compe, etc. But it does take decidedly more effort than a dual-pivot caliper.
I had no issues with Campagnolo Record brakes as a lad, but developing RA in my forties left me with reduced hand strength. Replaced with Shimano dual-pivots (7403 and 6500) resulted in much better ability to stop given what I can put to the levers...
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Old 06-18-22, 12:51 PM
  #54  
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Update: I bought a pair of Shimano double-pivot calipers and installed the front one this morning, with brand-new KoolStop black (what I had in my stash) pads instead of the OEM Shimano pads. What a difference!!! As soon as I recover from my second COVID booster (1-degree temperature elevation, just enough to make me feel like cr@p) and feel a bit better, I'll do the rear. I get the point about modulation with the old brakes, but I think I can easily control these safely without skidding out or flipping over the bars. These have not only increased leverage, but also reduced return spring tension, and braking from the hoods now feels super-secure.
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Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Carlton: 1962 Franco Suisse, S/N K7911
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
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Old 06-18-22, 05:06 PM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by John E View Post
Update: I bought a pair of Shimano double-pivot calipers and installed the front one this morning, with brand-new KoolStop black (what I had in my stash) pads instead of the OEM Shimano pads. What a difference!!! As soon as I recover from my second COVID booster (1-degree temperature elevation, just enough to make me feel like cr@p) and feel a bit better, I'll do the rear. I get the point about modulation with the old brakes, but I think I can easily control these safely without skidding out or flipping over the bars. These have not only increased leverage, but also reduced return spring tension, and braking from the hoods now feels super-secure.
A friend recently had a quite unpleasant accident caused by having to use the front brake aggresively whilst going downhill. I never quite understood why people would use the front brake and never use it unless the rear one is fully engaged already (which is enough to stop me usually), but judging by how many people seem to be using the front one more, I'm probably just weird or something Yeah, I know the front one is always stronger (which is also why I wouldn't use it on its own).
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Old 06-18-22, 06:25 PM
  #56  
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Originally Posted by VintageSteelEU View Post
A friend recently had a quite unpleasant accident caused by having to use the front brake aggresively whilst going downhill. I never quite understood why people would use the front brake and never use it unless the rear one is fully engaged already (which is enough to stop me usually), but judging by how many people seem to be using the front one more, I'm probably just weird or something Yeah, I know the front one is always stronger (which is also why I wouldn't use it on its own).
Read Sheldon Brown on bicycle brakes. The shortest possible stopping distance is obtained when the rear tire just starts to lose traction. In this case, the front brake is providing all of the stopping power, and the rear brake is used to alert the rider of rear wheel lift-off. Shifting one's weight back in the saddle improves braking performance by reducing rear tire lift-off. For routine stops I normally use both brakes together, unless I need to give a hand signal when approaching a turn.

I, too, have a friend who got into a nasty over-the-bars crash.
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Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Carlton: 1962 Franco Suisse, S/N K7911
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
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Old 06-19-22, 04:16 AM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by John E View Post
Read Sheldon Brown on bicycle brakes. The shortest possible stopping distance is obtained when the rear tire just starts to lose traction. In this case, the front brake is providing all of the stopping power, and the rear brake is used to alert the rider of rear wheel lift-off. Shifting one's weight back in the saddle improves braking performance by reducing rear tire lift-off. For routine stops I normally use both brakes together, unless I need to give a hand signal when approaching a turn.

I, too, have a friend who got into a nasty over-the-bars crash.
From what I remember, front brake is 70% of the beaking power of the bicycle. Or, whatever the exact figue is, it is much more efficient. Which in case of my main commuting bicycle, would be really scary. In non-emergency situations, braking from the hood using rear brake, is sufficient to stop me. If I fully press the rear brake lever, the rear wheel will just stop turning (not good for the tyres or rims or brake pads) - it's the most efficient of brakes I ever used. But generally I don't have to and just brake from the hoods and gently slow down. Considering the higher efficiency of the front brake, I use it with more care. I mean it's all split second decision, not some sort of procedure to follow, but my muscle memory is to go right hand (cables are routed continental way - rear - right, front - left and I'm right-handed), then left. So effectively, I will use both brakes if I really, really need to stop right now (as in: kid runs into the road kind of situation). Complete with bracing against going over the bars. I will use the front one (gently) if I need to signal turning right. Another thing is that most of my riding is commuting to and back from work. In traffic and in terrain that doesn't get more than a gentle slope. So there's not a whole lot of chance for much speed, it's all easily controlled. I'm also a very relaxed kind of rider and rather aware of my surroundings and noticing what other road users and pedestrians are doing in front of me. Which all affects the way I brake. 99% of the time, gentle usage of the rear one to reduce speed is adequate. The good thing is that I can trust the brakes to work and not fail me. Not so much with the other bicycle, but I'm not done adjusting the brakes on that one and it's an even more relaxed ride for sunny days only
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Old 06-19-22, 09:02 AM
  #58  
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Those are nice brakes. If your levers are SLR, they cannot be improved upon.
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Old 06-19-22, 10:00 AM
  #59  
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Originally Posted by Classtime View Post
Those are nice brakes. If your levers are SLR, they cannot be improved upon.
Unless you install compressionless housing…
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Old 06-20-22, 05:39 PM
  #60  
John E
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One more update:
1) delighted with stopping power of both brakes;
2) astonished by the very light return spring tension of the calipers, compared to Campag.; no "third hand" tool required when setting cable length
3) rear caliper has trouble pulling the cable all the way back; I have ordered a set of Shimano Dura-Ace BC-9000, since my brake cables are old, anyway (housings at least are OEM from late 1981/early 1982);
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Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Carlton: 1962 Franco Suisse, S/N K7911
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
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