Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Looking for a vintage mtb made of steel.

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Looking for a vintage mtb made of steel.

Old 06-22-22, 07:49 AM
  #1  
Locomotief
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Locomotief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Posts: 141
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 15 Posts
Looking for a vintage mtb made of steel.

Hi there,
I'm not sure if I'm in the right place with my question? I'm looking for a vintage mtb bike made of steel for a cargo bike project. I've been looking on the dutch trading site and there's enough bikes to choose from. But the problem is that I'm not sure what bikes are made of steel 🤔. And if I ask 70% of the people that offer a bike don't react. Maybe you guys and girls know of a bike that's made of steel and has a decent and reliable gearing system and I can have a look out for.

This is my broken cargo bike I got for free a few weeks ago. The crank is broken and a pain to repair. I like welding and I always wanted to build a cargo bike with 21 gears on it so I'm gone go ahead with that plan.


It's not the first cargo bike I build but that one was made out of older single gear parts. Used it extensively for years but that broke in half.



Hope you don't mind I posted it hear and not in the utility area. One's I have all the information about the mtb i can use I can ask the moderator to move this topic.

Greetings Stef
Locomotief is offline  
Old 06-22-22, 08:40 AM
  #2  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 19,411

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 168 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5458 Post(s)
Liked 2,336 Times in 1,509 Posts
You should be able to have a pretty good idea whether the MTB is made of steel or not from the pictures. Plus most older, rigid MTBs were steel. Cannondale I think was one of the first to make an AL MTB. This, of course, might be different in the Netherlands.
bikemig is online now  
Likes For bikemig:
Old 06-22-22, 10:19 AM
  #3  
Bad Lag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: So Cal, for now
Posts: 1,686

Bikes: 1975 Bob Jackson - Nuovo Record, Brooks Pro, Clips & Straps

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 669 Post(s)
Liked 271 Times in 169 Posts
You need a few lessons in structural design.

The more you ride it, the more heavily you load it (including its own weight), the better your structural design has to be.
Bad Lag is offline  
Likes For Bad Lag:
Old 06-25-22, 12:18 PM
  #4  
Locomotief
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Locomotief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Posts: 141
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by Bad Lag View Post
You need a few lessons in structural design.

The more you ride it, the more heavily you load it (including its own weight), the better your structural design has to be.
I must admid that the old one was not the best design... it even had a high speed wobble at times. But it did its job for 3 years. And I moved a lot off stuff with it. Hopefully this one is better than the old one.
Locomotief is offline  
Old 06-25-22, 12:30 PM
  #5  
Locomotief
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Locomotief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Posts: 141
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 15 Posts
My search for a bike may have come to an end. The seller told me its steel and I can have it for a good price. It doesn't look all that bad on the sellers pictures. I'll keep the lock and I like the bag on it. And I'm curious what's under the saddle cover. It even has a vintage speedo!








I always like the threads with mystery bikes and I'm not sure what the brand is but maybe you guys can make a guess. After that I will ask the moderator to move this thread to the utility area.

Greetings Stef
Locomotief is offline  
Likes For Locomotief:
Old 06-27-22, 06:07 AM
  #6  
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 21,071

Bikes: 1959 Capo Modell Campagnolo; 1960 Capo Sieger (2); 1962 Carlton Franco Suisse; 1970 Peugeot UO-8; 1982 Bianchi Campione d'Italia; 1988 Schwinn Project KOM-10;

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1183 Post(s)
Liked 763 Times in 526 Posts
As far as I know, all of the pre-1990 Schwinn mountain bikes were steel-framed, but you can't have mine (see signature) for your project, because it's a keeper.
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Carlton: 1962 Franco Suisse, S/N K7911
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline  
Old 06-27-22, 06:33 AM
  #7  
T-Mar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 22,907
Mentioned: 613 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4548 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2,699 Times in 1,700 Posts
Originally Posted by Locomotief View Post
...This is my broken cargo bike I got for free a few weeks ago. The crank is broken and a pain to repair....
Most crank repairs would be far less less complicated, time consuming and expensive tha the project that you are proposing. What exactly is wrong with the crank?
T-Mar is offline  
Old 06-27-22, 06:43 AM
  #8  
TugaDude
Senior Member
 
TugaDude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 2,972
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 431 Post(s)
Liked 386 Times in 280 Posts
I agree with T-Mar's comment about the crank. Cranks get replaced, not repaired mostly, so what exactly is the issue. Just get a new crank.
TugaDude is offline  
Old 06-27-22, 06:55 AM
  #9  
T-Mar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 22,907
Mentioned: 613 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4548 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2,699 Times in 1,700 Posts
Originally Posted by Locomotief View Post
....I always like the threads with mystery bikes and I'm not sure what the brand is but maybe you guys can make a guess. After that I will ask the moderator to move this thread to the utility area.


Greetings Stef

The Exage Mountain rear derailleur, if OEM, places it 1988-1989. That time frame is certainly consistent with combination of thumb shifters, Unicrown fork and a chainstay mounted U-brake. Generally, Exage Mountain equipped bicycles were stituated around the crossover point between entry level and mid-range. I suspoect this one is closer to the former, based on what appears to a stamped rear dropout. The brand and model may be much harder to determine as many ATBs from this period were contract manufactured by companies with multiple clients. However, the serial number may allow us to verify the year and identify the manufacturer, if not the brand.
T-Mar is offline  
Old 06-28-22, 04:48 AM
  #10  
Locomotief
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Locomotief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Posts: 141
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
Most crank repairs would be far less less complicated, time consuming and expensive tha the project that you are proposing. What exactly is wrong with the crank?
The friends told me that a one moment the bearings just fell out. They took it to a bike shop and they weren't able to get the cups out. In the proces they damaged the ridges where the tool fit's in. They soaked it penetrant before they started so it was really stuck. I tried to do the same thing but the tool would slip out very easy. After that I tried to cut the cup with a saw but it seems the cups are hardened steel. Because I couldn't get very deep after a lot of work. If you guys know something else I can try let me know.



Locomotief is offline  
Old 06-28-22, 04:49 AM
  #11  
Locomotief
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Locomotief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Posts: 141
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
The Exage Mountain rear derailleur, if OEM, places it 1988-1989. That time frame is certainly consistent with combination of thumb shifters, Unicrown fork and a chainstay mounted U-brake. Generally, Exage Mountain equipped bicycles were stituated around the crossover point between entry level and mid-range. I suspoect this one is closer to the former, based on what appears to a stamped rear dropout. The brand and model may be much harder to determine as many ATBs from this period were contract manufactured by companies with multiple clients. However, the serial number may allow us to verify the year and identify the manufacturer, if not the brand.
The bike is not yet in my possession but I will check when I pick it up.
Locomotief is offline  
Old 06-28-22, 06:23 PM
  #12  
T-Mar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 22,907
Mentioned: 613 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4548 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2,699 Times in 1,700 Posts
Originally Posted by Locomotief View Post
The friends told me that a one moment the bearings just fell out. They took it to a bike shop and they weren't able to get the cups out. In the proces they damaged the ridges where the tool fit's in. They soaked it penetrant before they started so it was really stuck. I tried to do the same thing but the tool would slip out very easy. After that I tried to cut the cup with a saw but it seems the cups are hardened steel. Because I couldn't get very deep after a lot of work. If you guys know something else I can try let me know.

I'm having a hard time understanding how the bearings could have fallen out if the cups can't be removed.


When removing those cups you take a long bolt with the same thread as the axle spindle and insert it through the removal tool and tighten it into the spindle. That prevents the tool from slipping in the cup. With the remaining cup you place a large washer and nut on the indide of the cup and tighten the bolt.
T-Mar is offline  
Old 06-28-22, 07:07 PM
  #13  
Tyler26
Junior Member
 
Tyler26's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 10

Bikes: 1991 specialized HardRock, surly cross check

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Any old specialized HardRock or rock hopper would be rad!
Tyler26 is offline  
Old 06-28-22, 07:08 PM
  #14  
Tyler26
Junior Member
 
Tyler26's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 10

Bikes: 1991 specialized HardRock, surly cross check

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Or an old Fuji!
Tyler26 is offline  
Old 06-28-22, 07:21 PM
  #15  
Korina
Happy banana slug
 
Korina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Arcata, California, U.S., North America, Earth, Saggitarius Arm, Milky Way
Posts: 2,973

Bikes: 1984 Araya MB 261, 1992 Specialized Rockhopper Sport, 1993 Hard Rock Ultra, 1994 Trek Multitrack 750, 1995 Trek Singletrack 930

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1173 Post(s)
Liked 933 Times in 601 Posts
Originally Posted by Locomotief View Post
The bike is not yet in my possession but I will check when I pick it up.
Take a magnet with you.
Korina is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.